Spring 2012

Spring 2012
by ani

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New answers tagged

1

In the ECN-2 process there is an alkaline bath applied at the beginning of the proces that releases the remjet coating which is afterwards removed before development. This is hard to replicate manually in complete darkness, because you don't have visual feedback if the layer was properly removed everywhere. But the developer is alkaline as well and releases ...


2

I think using a bath tub for development is a bad idea. you won't be able to clean the bathtub perfectly, after some time you will have some stains in hard to clean areas as far as I know the particular benzene derivative contained in Rodinal is not known as carcinogen, but many similar chemicals are and I would not expose naked bodies of innocent people ...


1

Film photography embraces the use of chemicals. For the most part, the chemicals we use are benign; otherwise the darkrooms of the world would be labeled as a hazardous workplace. Not to say there is absolutely no danger as the potential to mishandle chemicals is with us always. There are a plethora of developer formulas, all have advantages and ...


2

From my experience (25+ years in the photo industry), Fuji film tends to handle overexposure by one stop without the need to pull-process. However, as Alaska Man stated, if you shot mainly in high-contrast or bright lighting, having the roll pulled a half-stop or full stop should help -- not fix 100%, just help. Overexposing actually decreases contrast, not ...


0

What are the points here that would help me decide. expired films may have lower than nominal speed, so consider how old the film is. Perhaps you are not overexposing it after all overexposure will increase contrast and color, this may be wanted or unwanted depending on your subject type of light the film was shot with. If it was shot with incandescent ...


4

I regularly over expose my film by 1/3 to 2/3 or 1 full stop depending on the conditions and the film and with the knowledge of how that film behaves and develops in the developers i use. Generally speaking overexposing film is better (to a point) than underexposing as you can not get details in the shadows in post processing if you did not record those ...


1

MirekE is spot on -- Try to adjust exposure to allow a minimum of 90 seconds developing time. Your stop bath will work OK -- best for simplicity to switch to 15ml of ordinary vinegar per liter. Extend your fix time to 4 minutes. Do test a strip of unexposed paper. If you are working via a safelight, place a strip of paper emulsion up in your work area. ...


3

If you remove the paper from the developer after 20 seconds, the clouding could be caused by uneven development. Look at the recommended development time for the paper and the developer and adjust exposure accordingly.


54

Photo films and papers are made from salts of silver that naturally only darken when exposed to violet or blue light. In the early days of photography, this was all that was available. Therefore these films and papers are able to be handled under any light source that does not radiate blue light. By the way, the violet and blue frequencies of light are the ...


1

Basic silver halides used in darkroom photography are sensitive to blue light. Special chemicals are added to the emulsion to extend the sensitivity range to other visible colors. Some materials are sensitive to all colors (reversal and negative color films, reversal and negative panchromatic b&w films), some have minor gaps in sensitivity (color papers ...


11

it seems a little odd that there is a type of light that doesn't affect film or developing paper etc. There are types of light that don't affect the rods and cones in your retina, too. You can't see infrared or ultraviolet light even though some other animals can. It's the same idea with photographic materials: they vary in their sensitivity to different ...


0

A "safelight" is only safe for black & white processing from a distance and not for extended periods of time. The materials are less sensitive to the red or brown light wavelengths used in these lights.



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