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by garik

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25

The problem is definitely not overexposure; that renders negatives black. To work out whether it was underexposure or a development problem, there's a fairly straight-forward indicator: Do you see any edge markings (marked red in the example below)? They'll vary from film to film; not all will have barcodes, but there's usually a name or number at the ...


14

Here is where I'm at on this problem, pretty close I would say, short of looking around for a professional negative scanner. Flatbed scanner, lid open @Rafal first suggested I have a look at Alexey Alexeev's "Scanning Wet-Plate Collodion Ambrotype or Tintype Plate" on YouTube. It certainly looked promising. Alexey's photos are great by the way, check his ...


11

The manual (linked from the camerapedia page) says it takes a particular kind of 21/4 x 31/2 pack film, which (like I think you guessed) isn't made anymore. It's hard to say without being able to look at the camera, but I'd suggest there are two main options: The first is to use 21/4x31/4 sheet film, which should fit. You'd likely have to rig up some sort ...


11

Developing film is a rewarding, easy, and forgiving process: I used to do it with young children at summer camp and it never failed (even in 85 degree weather!). At a minimum you need a developing tank, developer, and fixer. It helps also to use a stop bath (a mild acid, essentially dilute vinegar but purified). You also temporarily need a perfectly ...


10

First, some background: Developer works by turning silver halide crystals on the film base which have been exposed to light into metallic silver. When the film is put into fixer, silver halide (unexposed) is dissolved and any metallic silver (exposed) is left alone. Being an analog process, crystals which have been exposed to more light will react with ...


8

Repeatable? Definitely. Using the same film, cross-processing has perfectly repeatable results, but it helps to be specific: the negatives will turn out the same, positives (virtually always scans) may not, and it's the positives you see on Flickr and elsewhere. The reasons for this are pretty simple: both the film emulsions and processing chemistry (both ...


7

You can have slide film processed like normal film, left in long strips, or more commonly they are individually cut into single frames and mounted in a cardboard or plastic holder, which keeps them flat, and these mounted slides can then be put in a cartridge of a slide projector. The mounts can be seen here. The processing is exactly the same, so no ...


7

Once you have the negative you use an enlarger to create your prints. An enlarger has a head containing a bulb, a negative holder and a lens. The head is on a column attached to a base. You can raise the head away from the base to make the image larger (or turn the head to project the image onto a wall for large prints) If you want to do a contact sheet, ...


7

A great deal here depends on the developer you're using. In this case, there are three key ingredients. First, is the fact that it's Rodinal. Rodinal is a one-use developer, meaning that you use it once, and then throw it away, because the chemicals get "used up' in the course of developing one batch of film. Second is the high dilution, to keep the amount ...


6

I don't know from experience, but I think it would be possible for the film base to deteriorate after such an extended time, and thus cause it to become more fragile. I would consider developing it by hand rather than having it run through a machine which might put undue pressure on the roll. Also - In my opinion, "trying" it is always worth it ;) You never ...


5

I remember my father dealing with glass plate negatives. In fact we even coated glass plates and took photographs with those fabulous old cameras. But back to your query, I certainly cannot say which is the best method, but the method he used was simply to get into the dark room and either make a contact transfer or enlarge. The contact transfer has the ...


5

Certain Costco locations do develop & scan (3000x2000) to CD for ~$5. You'll have to call to see if one near you provides it.


5

Currently (July 2010) in the UK: photo express develop & scan 35mm or APS to 2048 x 3072 on CD for £4.50 Metro Colour Lab develop & scan 35mm to 4MB on CD for £6.50 or £7 for 18MB peak imaging develop & scan 35mm to 1800 x 1200 on CD for £6.96 (or more for higher resolution)


5

I worked in a professional photo lab for a number of years. Cross Processing was something that guys like Scott Clum and Trevor Graves were using for their photography back in the pioneering days of snowboarding. The effect produced is very striking. The most common characteristics of cross processing is contrast and extreme color crossovers. Crossovers ...


5

The reason it's cheap to get done is because the machines carried in stores and labs have already paid for themselves over the years. They're cheap only because of massive volume. It's far from a simple process, especially because the temperature and timing tollerances for the process are extremely narrow. I've done some research into this in the past, and ...


5

It is not currently possible to either save multiple .XMP files per image nor to save multiple versions of settings in a single .XMP file. Here are a couple workarounds: Instead of creating a virtual copy, make one set of adjustments and save a snapshot in the Develop module, then go on and make the other set of adjustments. This is kind of clunky, but ...


5

I would image most schools are only set up to do black and white photography, as it is easier and less expensive (or was when I was doing it) Finding a school that can process color photos (I assume yours are color film) is probably a long shot. You could ask a printing business (or Walmart etc) if they can do a special rate for you. You can also just ...


5

Summary: :-( E-26 seems to be about impossible to do yourself but there are still labs that handle it. About $30/roll on up a few years ago. Ron Andrews, who should know IF his claims are true (see below), says that IF you can get the rem jet backing off cleanly, which he has doubts about, then you can self process using the E-6 process, but colours will ...


5

If you are sure you took 10 photos in the middle of the roll and they don't appear, it sounds like there is a mechanical problem that prevented the film advancing and prevented the shutter opening for 10 exposures, which somehow then righted itself after those exposures. There is a slight chance it could be due to not fully winding the film on during that ...


5

apply the fixer once you're happy with the result I actually use stop bath. I assume you can't use the same chemicals you'd use normally, right? I followed Jeno Dulovits on this, basically using D23 diluted in half. Rodinal works quite good too, especially for the old emulsions. I know people using HC-110. See Antec saying "High sulfite ...


4

Alternative Photography, which is on Google's first page, is still one of the best resources I know of for alt-process photography, so I'll recommend it anyway: http://www.alternativephotography.com/wp/processes/wetplate/the-wetplate-collodion-process The forums at f295.org are low-traffic, but generally helpful and knowledeable, and don't show up for the ...


4

Yes it is possible, and this is referred to as "Cross Processing" Regarding the expected results, there is a good quote from wikipedia. Cross processing It is also possible to cross-process slide film for the E-6 process in C-41 , which yields negatives with a color shift and stronger saturation. (C-41 also may be processed in E-6 yielding ...


4

Unless you seriously abused this film, there's no problem. I have taken film of all types--B&W, color slides, color prints--on repeated long trips, including extended ones outdoors in the desert, developed it late--sometimes years late--and noticed no degradation at all. The only exception was a roll I found last year (Ektacolor or something like that) ...


4

As long as the camera has been protected from the elements, and stored in moderate conditions (ie, no extreme hot/cold/humidity), I think you should be fine. Six months isn't that long, and the guidelines take into account that people might not be taking care of the camera. You might see some degradation in the colors, but probably not much. It's worth a ...


4

There are massive differences in film developers & techniques. You have a large topic to cover, my friend. Back in the day, film development was the most important step in getting good prints. It's also really freaking hard. If you are serious about learning about film development, then at some point you should start trying the various Pyro formulas. ...



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