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To increase the effect of "bokeh blur" with thin depth of field, there are a number of things you can do in-camera. Obviously, opening up your aperture wider will decrease depth of field, but moving from the typical fast prime widths of f/1.4-f/2 into the rarer f/0.95-f/1.2 will have a notable effect, if you can afford the glass, simply because not many ...


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You are asking how to make the background as blurry as possible while keeping the subject sharp. That means maximizing the circle of confusion diameter for background objects while ensuring that the subject remains within the focus field. The depth of the focus field depends largely on the magnification, the f-number, and the output resolution (circle of ...


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One of the things that finally "clicked" with me and DOF is to think of DOF as dependent on magnification -- not distance or focal length. For example, 20' at 100mm has the same DOF as 10' at 200mm. Think about macro: Distance doesn't change the DOF -- the degree of magnification of the subject on the sensor does. What this does for me is I think about ...


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Usually, photographers like more background blur, which you achieve with: big sensor, large aperture, and long lens (50mm or higher); which are all more expensive. Lucky for you, that means you can buy a cheaper lens and camera that will give you exactly what you want. What you want is a "slow" (that means a small aperture), wideangle lens (maybe around ...


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You will find that lenses marketed as good for portraits will have a "short telephoto" focal length and a wide maximum aperture. Using a wide aperture is what blurs the background. (This is widely considered to be a desirable effect in a portrait photograph.) But you can always just use a narrow aperture, and the background won't be blurred. Any lens will ...


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Lens factors that give deeper depth of field The longer a lens is, and the larger its aperture setting (limited by its maximum aperture), the less depth of field and the more background blurring it will give. (See: How can I take a photo with everything in focus with my DSLR?) Portrait lens Lenswise, I'd actually say that what you're asking for is the ...


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What you want is to have a deep depth of field. This keyword and your favorite search engine will answer your question. Essentially, it depends less on the lens than on how you use it: close the diaphragm and you'll get a deeper depth of field. Now, you have to be aware that most photographer would disagree with you, and would argue that a good portrait ...


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Depth-of-field (DOF) We focus our camera to obtain a sharp image of an object at a specific distance. We know from practical experience that objects before and behind the distance focused upon will appear sharp. This span of acceptable sharpness is what we term depth-of-field (DOF). The DOF span is variable based on several factors: Focal length of the ...


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In other words, a 50mm f/1.8 lens on an APS-C camera would act more like a 80mm f/2.8 (approx. 1.8 * 1.6x) lens in 35mm equivalent — for depth of field, not considering exposure. Yes, a 50mm f/1.8 lens on an APS-C camera would act more like a 80mm f/2.8 (approx. 1.8 * 1.6x for Cannon) lens in 35mm equivalent, as far as DOF and to some extent image noise ...



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