I Dare You!

by peter_budo

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-1

Instead or in addition to increasing the F-number, you can also consider increasing the distance to the persons or if you use a zoom lens to zoom out. The DoF when focussing at an object a distance d away is given by DoF = d^2/H where H is the hyperfocal distance, assuming that d is much smaller than the hyperfocal distance H (typically H will be of the ...


3

You have quite a few options here, but in practice I've found one that works best for me. Rearrange your subjects so that their eyes are at the same distance from your lens Use a narrower aperture for greater depth of field Choose a focus distance between the two subjects rather than a focus point on one specifically Use a wider focal length(at the same ...


1

You should use a different aperture. If you are using a lens that has an aperture with a low number, say 1.4 or 1.8 for example, you should change that to a higher number, say 4.0 or 5.6 The higher the aperture number is, the more closed is the aperture. This reduces the amount of light and increases the are that is within acceptable sharpness. I know it ...


2

The article you cite is not very good advice if you want great sharpness for landscape photography: it’s based on the concepts of depth of field and hyperfocal distance. These concepts are intended to help the photographer find the required aperture for getting barely acceptable sharpness across the relevant parts of the picture. What the author (like many ...


0

not to restate what has already been said, but there are good apps for smart phones which calculate hyperfocal distance for you. one app in particular i have for iphone that i would think be helpful to your understanding of this is called DOFmaster. you can plug in your focal length, f-stop, and select the HD button and it will produce your hyper focal ...


3

If your objective is to get as much as possible of your subject in focus and you know in advance that most of your subject is beyond the half-hyperfocal distance then this may be helpful advice that simplifies the focusing process in setting up your shot. However, there are at least a couple complicating factors: The hyperfocal distance changes with the ...


8

Then why don't we set the focus distance to be the nearest as possible, as this will achieve the maximum depth of field? Because it won't. If you focus on a point closer than the hyperfocal point, then the depth of field gets shorter. Infinity is no longer in focus. So the best would be to focus on the object at 0.4m, as it will cover 0.2m to ...


6

Focusing at a point closer than the hyperfocal point loses the depth of field at infinity. For example, if the hyperfocal point is 1.2m, and you focus at 1.2m, then your depth of field is from .6m to infinity. HOWEVER, if you focus at a point closer than 1.2m, say 1.0m, your depth of fields drop to between .55m and ~6m. You can see the effects subject ...


2

There's no sharp limit between in and out of focus. Everything but the focal plane at some exact distance is out of focus, it is just so slightly so that we don't notice it. There are two reasons why somebody would choose focusing further than the hyperfocal distance - the first being that when you focus exactly on something further than hyperfocal distance ...


1

It does look a bit like a tilt-shift lens, but I wouldn't be 100% positive. I'd say it was taken with a 50mm/<1.2 lens on a full-frame sensor. With a 35mm and an APS-C sensor you would need to be closer to the subject in order to achieve that field of depth. A flash might have been used, but I think you do not need any for that kind of shot.


7

I'm going to take a wildass blind guess, but doing an image search on Google which led to WrongRob's Instagram and then his website, it looks like he shoots with a Leica M, which has a full frame sensor in it. So my guess would be that the thin depth of field may have been created with a Noctilux 50mm f/0.95 lens. Whatever apertures he's using, if he's ...


0

If you want shallow depth of field, you need 3 things: wide aperture, long focal length, large sensor (eg. full 35mm frame or 120/220 film). Out of those, only aperture can be varied freely, because both sensor size and focal length show on angle of view, changing your composition. Longer focal length and larger sensor somewhat cancel each other. This sadly ...


4

The lens used would have a reasonably large aperture (low F number). This gives the effect of a relatively narrow depth of field and also allows more light to get to the sensor, making it easier to capture a correctly exposed image. The focal length used would be in the 'normal' range (somewhere around 50mm for Full Frame, or 30mm on APS-C), as opposed to ...



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