Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

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35

Here's some of what I do: Throw out the worst first. Blurry, blown out, excessively dark/noisy. Back-of-somene's-head is usually included here too. Repeat the above rule a few times, raising the bar for "worst" so that it's relative to the new set. Try to eliminate duplicates. This is an especially big deal when shooting in burst mode. Take X pictures that ...


32

I don't know if this is a great system, but here's what I do: After the shoot/session is done I immediately sort through every frame I took looking for the 'keepers.' I do it this way because for me it is easier to choose to keep the great shots than it is to delete the borderline shots... That may just be me. :-) Next I sort through every frame I didn't ...


18

First of all my workflow is based on Lightroom, but I know other software allows you to work like this. I never delete anything on camera. Import everything into Lightroom, I prefer not to skip any images at the import stage, this also means everything gets copied to my archive. First pass, in loupe view, image at full screen, I use the flagging system to ...


16

Not sure that a picture with incorrect histogram, excessively dark/noisy or blurred should be removed immediately. Sometimes I see that even defective picture looks good after time. For example (as for me): So I found the best method to select the best pictures: I just show the pictures to my wife.


14

Delete the bad ones vs. Keep the good ones. Until some months ago I have always taken the usual approaches: Mark the ones which are not really good, delete them, and repeat this step multiple times. I found this was very time-consuming and at the end I still had a lot more pictures than I wanted to have. My new way is the opposite: Mark the images you want ...


12

Delete is my friend and I use it frequently: Delete immediately in-camera if I know I missed a shot. Things like people entering the shot at the wrong moment, forgot the camera was in MF, etc. Delete anything that is not technically perfect: sharp, focused, well exposed, well framed, correct WB, level, etc as a first pass on the computer, using PMVIew Pro ...


11

The answers per criterion: In LR go through the photos in the Library module with the Loupe view using the arrow keys. Hit X when you want to discard a photo. To keep the discarded photos from the list click the left and middle flag in the filter bar. I've added a screenshot showing the location of the buttons: This hides the discarded photos from the ...


10

If you've ever stood over a light table, not a light box, but a table that's 4'x4', covered with 35mm and medium format transparencies, you'd notice that some images jump out at you. Even with hundreds of shots in front of you, some grab your attention and others are invisible, even though, by themselves, they'd be great photos. That's why LightRoom, ...


7

Take Fewer Photos Slow down. Be more deliberate. Consider the "why" of each image before you capture it. Of course, you could go back to your smaller camera!? ;)


7

Since some people in the question comments repeatedly told me it was rather trivial, I actually did it: An application that sorts the images in the current directory by leaving the actual head-to-head comparison to the user.1 Written in C# for .NET 2. Works on Mono (tested on Linux so far), too. Requires dcraw on the PATH (compiled executable for Windows or ...


6

While viewing protected images on your Nikon D-90 press White Balance/Key button and this will unprotect them. I had the same problem but don't know how I managed to "protect" them in the first place..lol. :))


5

Either format the card with the format function from the menus, or browse the photos and press the key button to unlock the photos, then erase them.


5

Use Lightroom's Synchronize command. You can execute this command at whatever level in your catalog is most appropriate, and you will have the option to remove all missing files which, if you have already intentionally deleted your image files, is what you want.


5

This article by Chase Jarvis explains his awesome workflow. He shows how he selects few pics to put on his portfolio and show to his clients from a set of about 15K clicks.. This is the summary: There are 5 stars available in any workflow management s/w like bridge or aperture. He uses the stars in following manner to sort the pictures out. 1* – Pace: Full ...


4

I have struggled with the same question on occassion. One of the first things to look at is how you are reviewing the images. There are various tools out there that can help with the task. For example there is Lightroom and PhotoMechanic to name two of the popular ones. These have rating tools, or flags for setting Pick or Reject. However this task can also ...


4

Deleting comes first in my workflow. As I mostly take photos during vacations, some many pictures add up. I have noticed that often the same process holds if I go shooting some special site/object only: Deleting done sometimes already in camera (you know when you f*ck up) at first review: I move everything I do not like into a deleted-folder1 this way ...


4

It's hard to say if this is easily doable in Lightroom without a sample image, but I think there are two ways to do this. The used tools are found in the Develop module. Spot removal Click the spot removal icon: Set the brush type to clone: Adjust parameters to your liking. A good start is: feather = 10, size = 50, opacity = 100. Now click on the ...


3

The problem is that Lightroom does not know about these images, so it cannot do anything about it. Essentially you want to know which photos are not in Lightroom. I have no idea how to do that but I think this will work: From Lightroom, select the folder or tree where these photos are and synchronize it. It will popup the import dialog, just continue the ...


3

1) Did you take a picture? 2) Keep the picture. That's it. Take a blurry picture of your shoe by accident? How do you know in ten years you'll not be into abstract shoe shots? Or perhaps just want what happens to be the only image of what turned out to be your favorite shoes. The point is, there's no need to decide. Just keep. Over time review what ...


3

The best for what, is always the question. If something is going to be printed large or shown where you want people to admire both technique and artistry, then you start by removing technically flawed images. If the image is going to someone who is not going to be primarily judging on technical merit, you probably want to look for the best composition or ...


3

I have consistently found that an iterative approach leads to the best results. How you do the iterations depends on many factors, including what you mean by best, the % of good and bad photos you take, how many of your photos are technically ok (in focus) etc. Either way, the goal is to eliminate more photos quickly in the early passes and pay closer ...


3

At events with a lot going on (races, air shows, sports games) reviewing in camera and being more considerate with your shots aren't always that practical. The latter comes with experience, but even when experienced you still want to be taking a series of shots in these scenarios (guaranteed you would end up with a silly facial expression or closed eyes if ...


3

You needed to use the Delete From Disk option. You removed your reference to the images in Lightroom and it now has no more idea about them than it does about your Word documents and internet browsing history. One thing you could do since you have so few images is you could make a new folder, drag the photos to keep in to that folder in the Library view ...


2

One of the toughest, but most effective, things to do is discard (I don't necessarily mean delete forever, just don't include it in that final 10) any image that isn't technically perfect. So if you didn't nail the focus, or there's something distracting in the picture (whether it's litter or you didn't frame the picture right so there's a tree growing out ...


2

Everything I shoot goes, unsorted, nothing deleted except complete failures (like flash failed to fire, causing a completely black frame, shutter failure) on DVDs labelled with datastamps and project name. Using 4GB CF cards helps, I just burn each card to DVD. Each card then gets processed in turn, yielding a new (2nd) DVD with processed versions in TIFF ...


2

Any better way of doing this? Yes: delete them from within Lightroom, which will remove them from the Lightroom catalog and gives you the option to delete from the filesystem. To fix this, you can just go to Lightroom and find the file(s) you deleted and delete. You'll be warned that the file can't be found, and can just proceed.


2

Yes, Total Commander can do this. I will post step by step screen shots here. For the example I have 3 folders a,b, and c. A is the working folder where the subset is. B is the backup with all files. C is the destination for the deleted files First enter both folders in the split view: Then Commands->Synchronize dirs and "compare": Then deselect ...


2

Highlight pictures and press MENU/OK to select or deselect (pictures that in a photobook or print order are shown by S). When the operation is complete, press DISP/BACK to display a confirmation dialog, then highlight OK and press MENU/OK. I suggest to read page 65 of the manual.


2

You just need to combine Reject with the Filter Bar: Click Attribute, then click the middle of the three flags (unflagged), and set the rating to "equals no stars". This filter shows you only those photos you haven't made a decision about yet. Save this filter as a preset. I call it THE CHAINSAW, because it helps me cut a large block of photos down to the ...


1

I had the Lumix DMC-L1K but I think this applies to all digital cameras. Check your camera preferences for "USB mode". It should be set to USB Mass Storage. Other modes (e.g. "Auto") may allow you read access to the flash card but not write access. Write access is needed to delete files. The mythical issues with fragmentation don't exist. File ...



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