Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

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22

Likely culprits, in order of probability: Bad SD card (by far the most likely, especially with cheap cards). Bad cable or card reader (more common than you might think). Something wrong on your computer (many things can go wrong!). A bad connection inside the camera. Something horribly wrong with the camera's electronics. The "bad card" scenario is, ...


8

With this kind of situation you need to narrow things down. Transfer the photos to a different computer. If the problem is solved, it's likely your computer. If not, try a different card. If all the photos come out fine, it was the card. If you still have a problem, it could be the cable at fault; try another one. If it's still corrupting, then it's likely ...


6

Never backup just at home. All backup solutions have some chance of failure including the loss, theft, fire, floods and natural disasters. There should be two copies in two different physical locations at all times. So, even if you make the backups at home, be prepared to take one elsewhere. Mine duplicates go in a safe at the bank. For the highest volumes ...


6

The best option, and one which I use myself, is two fold. I've done this for a couple years now, and while at times it is tedious, it is the only way I actually feel safe about my LARGE photography library (~40,000 RAW photos, averaging around 23mb each) as well as my growing library of edited photos, photos sized for web publishing, photos sized for various ...


5

From the Exif Info, The normal photo has exposure 1/60s, ISO 80 and f4.9 without flash, focal length 13.6mm. The purple one has exposure 1/60s, ISO 1000 and f5.9 with flash, focal length 33mm. This picture should have been overexposed by at least 3 stops + flash if you had taken it with the same lighting as the normal picture. Its possible that the ...


5

To run counter to the questions here - there is NO WAY the quality of your card can affect image quality or content. All a bad card can do is not save images correctly (or at all). The noise would very likely be from the camera itself.


5

There is one possibility and that is an operator error. Any one of these will do it: If you took out the card from the camera before it was finished writing. In this case your pictures are lost since they were never stored correctly. If you took out the memory from the reader before it was finished reading (If you use Windows, you should use the ...


5

In general, if you want to keep your data longer than the 4-5 year average life span of a hard drive, you need at least two copies on two different devices. Ideally, those devices should be in different physical locations. The trick is mostly to have the backups run automatically, so you don't forget it. I recommend Crashplan, it's the simplest and most ...


5

That's not pink — that's magenta. The difference is significant because magenta is the mix of blue and red primaries, with no green. That implies that the green channel information for that part of the file is damaged. But also, it's pretty clear that most of the image is messed up far beyond beyond that. I'd write this one off as not salvageable. If you ...


5

The image was corrupted by random bytes of information being lost in the data transfer. You can tell because each time information is lost, the image shifts (because pixels end up missing as it fills each line). It's also not an even number of pixel information since some of the times that information is lost, it causes the color information to get shifted ...


4

Looking at the raw file, the JPG preview looks fine, but there is about 1/6th of the RAW image that is blanked out. It could have been a glitch in the camera, an error on the card, or an error in the transfer to your computer. If you still have the image on the card, I'd try to transfer again. Then reformat the card and see if it happens again. If it ...


4

I had similar issues with images on my Nikon D70. Occasionally the camera showed a 'CHA' error message, images written to the card were corrupt (but could be resurrected by a data recovery tool). As it turned out my camera has contact problems at the CF card slot. Sometimes reinserting the memory card helps, sometimes I have to use contact spray to get my ...


4

File deletion essentially means removing file entry from file system (file system contains information about all location and size of all files on disc or memory card). If something goes wrong file system may become corrupted, rendering card inaccessible (all the data may be still there, but without filesystem you can't tell where one file begins and another ...


4

It most definitely is a image sensor/CCD/CMOS issue. These tend to fail over time due to heat, which could explain why it worked the first couple of months. It also isn't exposing properly (due to faulty CCD) hence the swirls and exposure of half a second. There was a time where they recalled their image sensors/CCDs but it was a while ago. It might be ...


3

The only way to determine the source of this issue is by process of elimination. Some things to try: if you put the card back into the camera, does the camera (preview window) display the images corrupted or correctly? try opening the image with a different application. if you are on a Mac (with OS X Lion) then Finder should be able to preview most RAW ...


3

Short: Free & marvellous Recuva - File Recovery software from Piriform worked for me when a substantial number of other free and for-$ programs failed to. The program is currently Windows-only but even a hardcore Mac man can probably stoop to using a Windows machine in such dire circumstances :-). Some notes at end or see their website as above. ...


3

This is a long shot, but if your JPEGs happen to be encoded in progressive mode, then you may be able to salvage a lower resolution version of your corrupted picture(s). Progressive JPEGs are encoded as several incremental "scans". The file begins with a scan that represents the whole image at a very low resolution, each successive scan builds on top of the ...


3

If the problem is with the huffman (this is the lossless part of the JPEG compression), then your chances of recovering the image information are really minimal. Huffman, like other forms of entropy coding, minimizes information redundancy in the data stream, ideally to the absolute minimum. This means that there are most likely no "other pieces" of the ...


3

That is what a JPEG image looks like when the file is corrupted. By corrupted, I mean a data corruption problem: one or more bits in the file are not what they should be - zeroes becoming ones or vice versa. JPEG is a lot more susceptible than any uncompressed format as a single wrong bit may make the bottom half of your whole picture purple or black or ...


3

From chuqui over at photos.stackexchange.com on How often should I format my memory card?: I format my card every time I stick it in my camera and start a shoot. I do this for a couple of reasons. First, it means every time I start a shoot, I don't accidentally leave the previous shoot on it (and it also means I don't delete it until I ...


3

Try converting the files from NEF to DNG with Adobe DNG Converter, and see if CS5 can open the DNG file.


3

One of the things I most love about digital photography over traditional film photography is how easy it is to have a backup. If my house burns down, my slides are gone forever but all of the digital photos are safe. Because of how easy it is to have a backup, and how cheap it is, I have many backups. Primary storage: roughly the most recent year is kept ...


3

No it doesn't. Lately I had a corruped one (see my post on Lightroom is not showing Photo correctly) and LR didn't mention anything.


3

Your first photos look pretty dramatic, but I think that's actually mostly a side effect of something other than the problem — you are doing it on purpose. I don't mean maliciously, but those are clearly examples where the weird artifacts are combined with a long shutter speed in order to make an interesting abstract effect. The "skeleton" image may be a ...


2

This behaviour is not normal. Aperture should write the assosiated source file(s) to the directory you specify in the export dialog, depending on the options probably in a subfolder named by the project. So something goes severly wrong. For troubleshooting I suggest you check the following things: Does this happen to all photos or only to one/some? Is the ...


2

It sounds like your photos may be fragmented, hence the grey areas making the images appear corrupted. Try Adroit Photo Recovery, which can take fragmented photos and stitch them back together. It's not free, though it is free to try to see if it works (and something like 20 bucks for a 7 day use, which is actually pretty cheap compared to some of the ...


2

Before resorting to software try using a POWERED USB hub. The additional amperage (I know that sounds like an overstatement) or stronger (not higher) voltage makes the images easier to read. I discovered this effect making repeated copies (or attempts to make copies) of an 18 Gb set of jpg.s on a 32Gb compact flash. The card is a new Sandisk Extreme. It ...


2

Depends on your budget. If your camera is in warrantee you may actually be able to get a free repair from canon. Budget: $500 and under I would recommend buying a used camera. Any old camera used will do: canon 50d, canon xt, etc. As long as the person hasn't used registered their camera warantee you're in good shape. I would inspect any pictures etc. ...


2

Jess, I'll ask "the stupid question" first: Have you tried clearing the cache in Bridge? With that out of the way: Have you tried to preview the images in a file manager other than Bridge? Iain


2

Since neither Windows nor the camera can read the card, I think the most likely scenario is that the changes Windows were about to write to the card were interrupted halfway through. Such interruptions will corrupt a file system for sure, and could happen if you just unplug the card instead of going through the Windows "safely remove hardware and eject ...



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