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by garik

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43

The key is adding some specific tags every time you import. I use Aperture (which is Mac-only,) but Lightroom has similar capabilities, as does iphoto. What you need to tag depends on what you shoot, and what you think you might be looking for someday, but this works for me: The people in the pictures. I use Apple's "Faces" feature to tag people in the ...


37

Here's some of what I do: Throw out the worst first. Blurry, blown out, excessively dark/noisy. Back-of-somene's-head is usually included here too. Repeat the above rule a few times, raising the bar for "worst" so that it's relative to the new set. Try to eliminate duplicates. This is an especially big deal when shooting in burst mode. Take X pictures that ...


33

I don't know if this is a great system, but here's what I do: After the shoot/session is done I immediately sort through every frame I took looking for the 'keepers.' I do it this way because for me it is easier to choose to keep the great shots than it is to delete the borderline shots... That may just be me. :-) Next I sort through every frame I didn't ...


29

You are right, that is a personal question and it will vary tremendously, some situations like fast-moving actions will often get a higher hit-to-miss ratio, so I do not think you can get a useful numeric answer. My motto for this is 'Delete is my friend' :) I first delete anything that is not technically perfect (with extremely few exceptions, less than ...


25

Adobe Lightroom is one application which a lot of professional photographers would use both for reviewing large quantities of images, and also for doing some initial post-processing. A lot of photographers these days find they rarely use Photoshop anymore, finding Lightroom very powerful in it's organising and post-process abilities. From it's conception, ...


20

Nice question. This is an issue we all face. My answer has two parts: 1) keep as much as possible 2) religiously tag your photos in an organized way. 1) Why keep as much as possible? Your perspective changes with time and 20 to 30 years later your photos acquire a historical value that transcends their artistic value. I discovered this when I started ...


18

First of all my workflow is based on Lightroom, but I know other software allows you to work like this. I never delete anything on camera. Import everything into Lightroom, I prefer not to skip any images at the import stage, this also means everything gets copied to my archive. First pass, in loupe view, image at full screen, I use the flagging system to ...


16

Maybe Photoshop Lightroom is a good answer for this. Especially because of the tagging functionality...


16

Not sure that a picture with incorrect histogram, excessively dark/noisy or blurred should be removed immediately. Sometimes I see that even defective picture looks good after time. For example (as for me): So I found the best method to select the best pictures: I just show the pictures to my wife.


15

For a free option, have a look at Google's Picasa. It allows you to sort your images via folders and tags, and easily upload them for sharing. It can be found here: http://picasa.google.com/ It also has rudimentary editing options, but I'd recommend Lightroom if you want a decent processing program. Conor's right, it's far from free at ~£250, but you can ...


14

Delete the bad ones vs. Keep the good ones. Until some months ago I have always taken the usual approaches: Mark the ones which are not really good, delete them, and repeat this step multiple times. I found this was very time-consuming and at the end I still had a lot more pictures than I wanted to have. My new way is the opposite: Mark the images you want ...


13

The people who make TinEye have a product called PixMatch which can search individual collections. It's not implemented as a desktop application, though — it's a server-based API. And it appears to be priced for serious enterprise use, not for individuals. So that's there, but not really an answer. But a competing company does have something for the desktop ...


12

To expand on what Nate has suggested you have the following options: A dedicated server with RAID External USB device as a secondary storage medium. Network based NAS with RAID support External USB based drive caddy that you could then use like a tape backup system and also ensure HDD stored offsite incase of fire There is also some software that can ...


12

Delete is my friend and I use it frequently: Delete immediately in-camera if I know I missed a shot. Things like people entering the shot at the wrong moment, forgot the camera was in MF, etc. Delete anything that is not technically perfect: sharp, focused, well exposed, well framed, correct WB, level, etc as a first pass on the computer, using PMVIew Pro ...


12

I have had some success posting pictures on Flickr asking for help identifying what it is, tagging with anything relevant possible.


12

Try Google Goggles if your phone can do it. You take a picture and Google looks up what it is. You mileage may vary but it works for reasonably well known location even with not so direct framing.


11

It doesn't make a lot of sense to organize photos by something that is already in the EXIF data, like the date the photos were taken. I organize my photos in folders by event/location. The most important thing is to make sure you tag as much as possible when you import. The chances of going back later to tag are basically nil, so you need to make sure to do ...


11

I'm a fan of Adobe Lightroom - its way of working seems to fit my mental model so I find it fairly natural to use. That does depend on you tagging the photos with appropriate metadata of course and not everyone thinks the same as me, so you may not get on with it. Picasa has matured nicely over the years and has a nice "face finder" that does a pretty ...


10

I've started generating a considerable amount of photography data myself. My main Lightroom library is well over 300 gigs, and there are also all of the backups. I tried out a couple Drobo RAID devices, which connect via USB (or possibly network, with an extra device.) The Drobo, while a simple to use device, is excessively slow. After some research, I came ...


10

If you don't want to pay for Adobe Lightroom or Apple Aperture, you could go with Apple's iPhoto or Google's Picasa. I'm most familiar with iPhoto; it does a fair amount of hand-holding when it comes to organizing photos. Smart Albums are really nice; you write the filter logic, and iPhoto shows you the matching photos on an ongoing basis. Works wonders for ...


10

If you've ever stood over a light table, not a light box, but a table that's 4'x4', covered with 35mm and medium format transparencies, you'd notice that some images jump out at you. Even with hundreds of shots in front of you, some grab your attention and others are invisible, even though, by themselves, they'd be great photos. That's why LightRoom, ...


8

Simply do a wildcarded search for JPEGs (*.jpg), narrowed down by date; all OSs have this functionality. You might have to do a bit of manual looking through, but this may jog your memory and help you narrow down the date range anyway.


8

You could try using TinEye Reverse Image Search to see if there are some similar pictures, perhaps those have some description nearby.


7

I've been using Picasa version 3.6. In addition to tags and geo-tagging, it also recognizes (some) faces and can attach "name tags" to photos. I use separate folders for the date the photo was taken grouped by months and years, e.g. Photos\2010\07\0720. Picasa orders the pictures by folder and date, or album and I can also search by tag, person, or ...


7

Take Fewer Photos Slow down. Be more deliberate. Consider the "why" of each image before you capture it. Of course, you could go back to your smaller camera!? ;)


7

Since some people in the question comments repeatedly told me it was rather trivial, I actually did it: An application that sorts the images in the current directory by leaving the actual head-to-head comparison to the user.1 Written in C# for .NET 2. Works on Mono (tested on Linux so far), too. Requires dcraw on the PATH (compiled executable for Windows or ...


7

Unfortunately I had the exact opposite criteria as you :) I looked at every software I could which did NOT touch the files and stored the information in a central database. The one constant is that having a central database makes it much more efficient to perform searches and filter your images. I do have hundreds of gigs of photos and the most efficient ...


6

If you have a Mac, you should consider Apple's Aperture. It's a fully featured workflow program that simplifies importing, tagging, organising, processing and publishing. It's often compared to Lightroom, and is significantly cheaper if you buy it using the Mac App Store - currently $79.99 compared with over $200 for Lightroom. It's also generally ...


6

Well, actually most photo editors can't do it. The category of software you are looking for is called digital asset management (DAM) software. There are review of 5 popular options here: http://www.neocamera.com/article.php?id=dam-software If simple and fast is your criteria, then I suggest you look at PicaJet FX. It is available for Windows for $60. You ...


6

In the Linux world Shotwell, though still new, shows a great deal of promise as a photo collection organiser. It is quick, intuitive, powerful yet simple to use. It provides essential post-processing tools and when those are not enough can call Gimp. Shotwell web site



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