Antarctica

Antarctica
by ʇolɐǝz ǝɥʇ qoq

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4

The short answer is no, a photo is just some recorded data and if you've only recorded 2/3rds of your head, you never had the data for that last third so there's no way to get it back. The long answer is maybe. Photoshop CC and Lightroom contain a tool called content aware that can estimate what is missing in a photo and fill this. Search on youtube for "...


3

From your question I'm guessing you accidentally cropped your head out of a photograph, and your head actually is in the original photo. If that's not the case then there's not much we can do to help. Possibly the original image will still be on whatever device you used to take the picture. Many image editing programs will save a new copy of the picture ...


4

However, it costs much more than I was planning to pay. As the size of the sensor increases the cost of the lens needed to provide an equivalent picture (same field of view, or depth of field, or brightness, etc.) increases rapidly. Not only must the lens be longer in focal length to provide the same field of view, but the diameter of the entrance pupil (...


2

If you are considering a camera with P pixels, and you have a minimum after-crop megapixel count you are considering (Pmin), then the digital zoom ratio of the camera is ZD = √(P / Pmin). Just multiply this digital zoom ratio by the lens's optical zoom ratio to get the total zoom ratio. Thus for the RX100 cameras, their optical zooms are 100/28 ~= 3.6×. ...


4

Cropping and zooming are basically equivalent, so this is easily calculated. Zooming in 2× — like, focal length 36mm to 72mm — is like cutting the frame in half. Of course, that's each dimension, so you need to square it to calculate megapixels. For example, a 24mpix image might be 6000×4000, and to simulate that 2× zoom, you'd cut it in half each way, to ...


0

This "freestyle" type of cropping is easily done in Photoshop Elements. I don't have the full Photoshop, I use Adode Photoshop Elements 14, but maybe you can take my answer here and find the corresponding options in Photoshop. -Select the Crop tool from the left side bar. You should then see a dropdown menu of crop options in the tool bar on the bottom of ...


1

Instead of a preset, select "Unconstrained". Then select the "handle" on the desired edge with the mouse and move that edge only. It is a fairly rough method, but you can hold the Ctrl button while using the mouse to prevent it from snapping to grid, so you'll have finer control. Once you're close, you can right-click, and select "Use crop box size and ...



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