Orquid "Phoenix"

Orquid "Phoenix"

by ceinmart

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92

One major difference is that a FF camera produces a depth of field that's around 1.3 stops shallower than an APS-C camera for the same subject & framing. This is most important when you have the aperture as wide as possible, e.g. for portraiture. To replicate the look of a 50 f/1.4 lens you'd have to use something like a 31 f/0.9 lens, which doesn't as ...


45

No, it is not a bad thing. It is not really "good" or "bad" in any sense. Its simply a different format than full-frame, which is different than medium format, etc. There are pros and cons to each. The smaller APS-C style "cropped" sensors do have some effects on lens focal length due to their field of view, and that can be beneficial or detrimental, ...


45

The price you pay for using FX lenses on DX is bigger and heavier lenses and less appropriate focal lengths. The core question you should be asking is: Why do you want to upgrade to full frame? Image quality in DX is superb and getting better. FX bodies have better low-light ability, but DX will be just as good; it just lags a few years. The higher ...


30

EF-S lenses are specifically designed for APS-C digital bodies and optimized for the fact that they have smaller sensor and mirror. EF-S lenses are marked with a white dot on the mount instead of red one that EF-glass has, and can be only used on EF-S compatible bodies (almost all of smaller-sensor Canon DSLRs, up to EOS 7D). Film and larger-sensor digital ...


28

Remember that full frame is not explicitly better than APS-C, it's just 'different'. It's perceived as better because shallow depth of field is very trendy, and that's the advantage of full frame, and for the portrait work I do it's invaluable, and even more important is the fact that I can shoot a scene at f2.8 and have it sharp, if I shoot the same scene ...


26

Stopping down is suggested because many lenses are considerably less sharp when wide open. This does not change on a crop-camera, since it is a property of the lens. There is however for most lenses a difference between center sharpness and corner sharpness. Most of the time, the center sharpness is substantially better than the corner sharpness. The ...


22

The "S" in EF-S stands for "short back focus", which means that the rear element of the lens is closer to the image sensor than on regular 35 mm SLR cameras. The proximity of the rear element to the image sensor greatly enhances the possibilities for wide angle and very wide angle lenses, enabling them to be made smaller, lighter ...


19

Focal length is a measure of the lens's ability to bend light. As such this figure doesn't change when you use a smaller sensor. What actually happens when you use a smaller sensor is that your field of view narrows. Field of view is dependant both on the focal length and the format (the size of your film or sensor). The ubiquity of 35mm film among amateur ...


18

f1.4 will always be 2/3rds stops faster than f1.8. The diameter has nothing to do with whether or not part of the sensor is hidden. That is a separate measurement referred to as vignetting, and not the image circle's light level. The image circle's light level/brightness is directly affected by the aperture of the lens design. FF lens simply means the ...


16

There were economic reasons, but they were not about getting to amateur market; it was more like getting any market. The main merit seen in early digital photography was speed of delivery (no need to develop films), so news agencies were the first targets. During the dawn of digital photography, a full frame sensor would have been enormously expensive to ...


15

Aperture is unaffected. The field of view becomes 35mm x (the crop factor of your sensor), which is 1.5 in the case of Nikon DX cameras (It's also 1.5 for Pentax and Sony, 1.6 for Canon and 2 for Panasonic & Olympus). So your 35mm Nikon lens has a 35mm x 1.5 = 52.5mm "35mm equivalent" field of view. Note that the perspective doesn't change, just the ...


13

Any EF fit lenses you own (usually marked with a red dot near the EOS mount) will work fine with the 5D mkII Any EF-S fit lenses you own (usually marked with a white dot near the EOS mount) won't work or fit the 5d mkII, as these are designed to fit crop sensor cameras like the T2i and not full frame sensors like the 5D mkII As an addition, some non-canon ...


12

I'm going to go with the very simple answer here: The lens does not change. The f/1.4 50mm EF lens has exactly the same focal length (and everything that goes with that) as your EF-S zoom lens set to 50mm. The "crop factor" is not useful for comparing different lenses on the same camera. It's only useful for comparing lenses across different camera formats ...


12

You would actually get at-par to somewhat better image quality using this lens on your cropped sensor, than using a lens designed for crop sensors, in some aspects: You would get rid of most of the vignette, as the DX cropped sensor is effectively stopped down 1.23 stops compared to full-frame. (ref. Wikipedia). Thus, from the review link you provided, the ...


11

Two very good answers already, but I want to chime in that isn't necessarily related to Crop vs FF, but rather your ultimate decision: 7D vs 5D Mark II. While the 7D and 5D2 have different sensors, they are also geared toward different usages. The 5D2 is not really designed with shooting action. It works (I use it), but the 7D is better with a higher ...


10

These are the different sensor sizes: Full frame sensor (Nikon's FX, Canon does not use special term): 36 x 24mm, no crop (actual size might differ slightly between brands and cameras) Canon's APS-H: 27.9 x 18.6mm, crop factor 1.3 Canon's APS-C: 22.3 x 14.9mm, crop factor 1.6 Nikon's DX: 23.6 x 15.8mm, crop factor 1.5 (23.1 x 15.4mm, crop factor 1.55 for ...


10

I'll just take this out into an actual answer, and the answer is 'NO', the crop factor doesn't make it a 1.5:1 ratio. What it does change is the ratio of information per pixel which would be an valid new designation. Why? Because the 1:1 ratio is a designation of how large the lens renders subjects on the focal plane whatever that plane is, it is an ...


10

All else being equal, yes. A bigger sensor requires more power. Advancement in power-saving technologies can sometimes improve that but with higher pixel counts being the norm, we do not see much of that. Each pixel requires circuitry so higher megapixels require more power than making the sensor bigger. Luckily bigger cameras have room for bigger ...


10

The crop will eliminate anything that happens outside of the sensor area. At worst you'll lose the worst of the vignetting, at best you'll lose all of it. Because the worst of the barrel distortion is right in the middle of the sensor, you're going to be getting all of it. (Edit: Anindo Ghosh correctly points out in his answer that the edges are actually ...


10

EV is a measure of illuminance, which is defined in the link you provided as "luminous flux incident on a surface, per unit area". You are correct in stating that when if you keep field of view, depth of field and subject brightness constant: Ev_crop = Ev_ff x c² however since: Area_crop = Area_ff / c² and Light(total) = EV x Area we arrive at ...


10

I believe F1.4 is the best you can do on a compact so far: http://www.dpreview.com/news/2012/7/18/Panasonic-announces-Lumix-DMC-LX7-with-F1-4-2-3-24-90mm-lens You know from 35mm format lenses that it is hard to find those that are sharp wide open. it is hard to get all those rays of light to hit a single small dot. On a compact sensor, those dots are even ...


9

The main stylistic reasons revolve around the ability to capture wide-angle shots (although less of an issue with wider EF-S specific lenses) and that a larger physical sensor allows for a narrower depth of field (for a given aperture/focal length) In additions, on a technical level, a larger sensor also allows for lower pixel densities, which can improve ...


9

As a former 5D owner I can tell you that using full frame, even on a camera as 'old' as that one, is a joy. The colours and image quality on that 12MP sensor are amazing. You will notice the benefits particularly with your 17-40mm lens. If I were in your position, I wouldn't hesitate to pick up a second hand 5D.


9

I guess the answer is yes and no. Technically speaking, the image circle projected by the lens is 1:1, and your sensor is capturing a smaller part of the center of that circle...cropping it. This fits with the formula for magnification: M = (di - f) / f Where di is the distance from the lens to the sensor, and f is the focal length. Crop factor or ...


9

If you have the money, go with the full frame option. The basic reasoning that I would have for that is simple: lenses will stay with you longer than the camera body. That's the nutshell answer. Longer answer is that today you have a 550D and you're learning. Stay with that camera while you're doing that, until you feel that the photography you want to do ...


9

I would choose the 7D for a few reasons: The effective maximum aperture of the 5D Mark II combo will be f/5.6 X 1.4 = 7.84, nearly f/8. This will somewhat cancel out the light-gathering advantage of the full frame camera. You will still have a bit less effective reach with the full-frame camera, even considering the small pixel-count difference and even ...


9

Foreshorntening (the technical term for the effect of "flattening" objects) is determined by subject distance only, not focal length. When using a wide angle lens if you are the same distance from your subject as you would be when shooting with a portrait lens, you'll get the same flattering effect, only your subject will take up less of the image. A crop ...


8

We can answer this with math. :) The difference between 22.2×14.8 and 23.7×15.8 is 14% more area. That sounds like it might be a lot, but remember that in order to make one stop of difference, you'd need twice as much area. So, while the difference isn't zero, it's small enough that it gets lost in other factors. When one is trying to go ultra-wide, that ...


8

The Nikon AF-S 50mm f1.4 G is not designed for the smaller DX sensor and has the same image circle as the 1.8 Are you thinking of the AF-S 35mm f/1.8 G DX which is designed for a smaller sensor compared to the AF-S 35mm f/1.4G? In any case the size of the image circle is of minor importance to the light gathering ability - only the aperture matters, as ...


8

How do you define image quality? Depending on the lens you may be able to get more detail out of the 7D, you may also get less noise and greater dynamic range (in good light, where read noise dominates and the extra light gathering ability of the FF sensor doesn't count as much). The 5D might have advantages in micro contrast and dynamic range in low light. ...



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