It's a bird

by Vian Esterhuizen

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1

There is a relationship between the focal length and the size of the sensor. For a larger sensor, the same focal length gives a smaller angle of view thus for an "equivalent" field of view you need to multiply the focal length by the same factor as the sensor size. Before the onset of digital cameras, by far the most popular film format was commonly called ...


-4

Most of the answers above are misleading. A Canon APC sensor has a crop factor of 1.6 which effectively changes the focal length by 1.6, therefore a 100mm lens has an effective length of 160mm. A simple exercise is to use the same lens on two difference bodies, one full frame and one cropped and you will instantly see the difference. You cannot use a full ...


3

No. You can imagine the micro4/3 to simply cut out the middle of the image. If you had a 25mm lens on a full frame camera and exposed it properly, the middle part of the frame is part of what's exposed properly. The definition of f-stop factors out the lens length so only f-stop and shutter speed determine the EV (exposure value). A 50mm lens or a 25mm ...


1

Going from a 6cmx6cm to 35mm, expect a focal length equivalent to 294mm f/7.8 on the original 6x6 medium format sensor. (note reducing the sensor size makes it a darker lens, not a brighter one, sorry) As sensor size decreases, depth of field will increase for a given aperture. Check out the calculator on the following page. Enter 35mm, 6x6 f/4 and 150mm. ...


4

A 150/4 on 35mm acts like a 150/4 on 35mm. Full-frame 35mm (43.2mm diagonal) is the default frame of reference. Equivalence is usually about referring some other sensor/film size back to that 35mm default. As in "if I use X on my camera it'll be like using Y on FF 35mm." But... the math in case you do care about the other equivalences: Diagonals are more ...


1

It will still be a 150mm f4 lens on a 35mm sensor. You will just be using a portion of the full image circle. The field of view will be narrower than what you are used to on medium format, you can work out the equivalent "focal length" from the ratio of the lengths of the film/sensor. E.g. For 6x6 film the horizontal angle of view will be the same as ...


6

There are many various film and digital sensor sizes and formats. 135 film (also known as "full-frame") became the most used film in the 60s and the most common format was 3/2, meaning 36mm x 24mm frame size. The camera determined the format/ratio but was always 24mm high. There were even half frame cameras that used this film but would result in 18mm x ...


4

The article you've quoted and linked to just seems to have some bad maths. When they're subtracting the percentages from 100, they seem to have forgotten to 'carry the one', so to speak. They've subtracted 66.66% from 100% and got 43%, and then 44% from 100% and come up with 66%. It should say the sensor's edges are 33% shorter (not 43%), with a total area ...



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