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by Aditya

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16

As a rough rule of thumb, photos tend to be printed at a maximum of 300 dots per inch (dpi), but anywhere from around 240dpi will produce a print that looks sharp when viewed closely. 300dpi means that every 1" × 1" square of print is actually made up of a grid of tiny dots, 300 dots along each side (and therefore 90,000 dots in total). A digital camera's ...


16

A related problem: just because you're intentionally in burst mode and ready to take a burst of shots, you shouldn't necessarily do it always. A less-important burst might make you miss out on a more-important burst. On digital cameras, there's a "burst buffer" that queues up a series of shots for internal processing. If you take more shots than this buffer ...


12

Not really - even on non action shots I fire off a couple and usually find that my 2nd or 3rd shot in is the sharpest. The biggest problem now is that you have 2-3 times the number of pictures to go through in post if you took more than you would have normally taken because of this. Its time consuming and its time you could be spending taking more ...


11

The maximum frame rates are just that - maximum frame rates. There are several things that will reduce the maximum frame rate. High ISO The higher the ISO you have selected, the slower the frame rate will be. Noise Reduction the stronger the in-camera noise reduction selected, the slower the frame rate will be. AI Servo Mode If you are using AI Servo AF ...


11

The rate is 4 frames per second in either case. The difference is in how long it can keep it up — 67 JPEG files of the "large fine" quality level, or 11 RAW frames. That's because it can basically keep going as long as it has RAM to buffer the files, and has to slow down as soon as it has to actually start saving to relatively pokey flash memory. The limit ...


10

Obviously, the lens cannot focus any faster just because the drive mode is set to burst. The time it takes to focus is the time it takes to focus. What you can do is tell the camera to take the shot without waiting for focus to lock. This is called Release Priority as apposed to Focus Priority. To change that you have to go to the Setup menu and find the ...


8

My camera has high speed 6.5 fps and low speed 3 fps. I use 3 fps most of the time. This is good for normal slow situations of people. 333ms is enough time to allow facial expression/eye blinking to change between the shots. 6.5fps is just way too fast and I fill up my CF card too fast and sorting the photos in the end will waste too much time. So I consider ...


8

I believe you'll need to set the 'release mode' in your camera to 'Continuous' to get it to burst the three shots. Also, reportedly, if your camera is on a self timer it will also take the three shots in a single button press after the time delay.


7

You did not say which camera you have and that makes a huge difference. On most DSLRs, you will not encounter any downsides if your camera is set to Focus Priority other than the volume of photos as @rfusca said. If it is set to Release-Priority you may get out-of-focus shots. On compact cameras, the burst-mode often turns off preview and you end up ...


7

This depends on who does the testing and the camera's capabilities. Most times tests are done with various parameters to rule out anomalies. A shutter-speed notably faster than the claimed shutter-speed should be used. To be safe I use 1/500s most times with good enough lighting to use a low-to-medium ISO setting. Its OK if images come out under-exposed in ...


6

I have the 7D and have never experienced this phenomenon. A couple of things to try:- Set camera settings back to factory defaults. (There is a menu option to do this). Wipe all custom function settings (not included in the above, I don't think). Try to replicate the problem after each step above. If it still exhibits the problem:- Remove the main ...


6

Remember, the camera is engineered around the 'burst mode'. The shutter box, mechanics, and computer+buffer are designed to enable and function at 8 frames per second. The electronics can handle even higher throughput of 30 frames per second, but of course without the mechanics of the shutterbox involved. So there would not be any 'downsides' to keeping the ...


6

I gave up on automatic burst modes when I realized that even with 5 to 10 fps, there's still plenty of time between each shot when shooting e.g. fast paced sports action. For that reason alone, I think it's better to learn to anticipate the moment and press the shutter manually. I think you have much better chances at capturing great shots this way. When ...


5

The answer to the simple question -Is 2MP high enough quality to print a 4x6? - Is yes. Especially if these are just being used for "fun" display purposes and not in a professional manner. They also would be suitable for most online use. Diving deeper in to the details of your question though, you are asking if your point and shoot camera is a good ...


5

Memory write speed is one factor so any delays during writing and the camera will have to slow down as the buffer isn't cleared fast enough. It's worth noting that not all raws are the same file size. Nearly all manufacturers employ some form of lossless compression on raw files. The amount of entropy (randomness) determines how much compression reduces the ...


4

We shot round 2 yesterday, and I went back to the 50 to try again. This time, I shot in "AI Focus" mode instead of "AI Servo" mode, and the 50 worked great. This left me feeling a bit unsatisfied, however, because I couldn't really explain why I was seeing the results I was seeing. The user manual, for instance, implies that AI Servo should be ideal for ...


4

A good resource for translating megapixels into print sizes is here, but generally at 200 PPI* - the results should be OK. There may be a whole host of other issues in shooting sports but it depends on your expectations. Your camera may not be able to focus fast enough and in general, shooting sports requires a good deal of anticipation of the action - ...


3

Please note that its shots per second, and not shots per (longer period) such as shots per minute. All digital cameras transfer the sensor data to a buffer and then transfer it to the CF or SD or whatever memory it has. The sensor and shutter are much faster than the CF/SD card, so after a second or two, the shooting rate is often much slower than the ...


3

The main advantage is easier continuous shooting over an extended time. Generally, continuous shooting goes in to a buffer and eventually that buffer fills. When shooting high quality RAW images particularly, that buffer can fill within 6 to 12 shots on many cameras. Even my 5D Mark III fills the buffer (with two very high speed cards) in about 17 shots ...


3

One downside I experienced was: When I did not want to shoot multiple pictures, I had to release the shutter right after pressing it. No problem, until I remarked that I did not hold the camera as steady as before anymore since my hand was already prepared to release the shutter. I usually keep Sigle Frame mode where I do not need to worry whether my finger ...


2

Unintentional bursts, which I do on occasion. In turn, this can mess with your flashes (they have to struggle to keep up with the shutter). However, I haven't noticed much of a problem in image quality with this. There's also the consequence of those extra & unnecessary frames you shoot. On digital, they're an annoyance. On film, that's real money ...


2

If you are using the buildt in noise reduction this would result in less shots. It kicks in after ISO640 and uses a lot of the buffer memory for processing.


2

The 20 sec. delay sounds like a problem for sure. That aside, with all the options like D-Lighting, noise reduction and so on turned OFF, this is what the D90's buffer is capable of: RAW +Jpeg fine = 7 RAW = 9 Jpeg fine = 25 Anything smaller and you can shoot till the cows come home. So basically, RAW + Jpeg is the worst setting for ...


2

I use the camera in burst mode (nearly) all the time. I don't always shoot bursts, but it's ready for me to do so if I wish, which I often do because: things move; if I am outdoors, stuff will move around, so a burst will perhaps give me some different options to choose between people move; when shooting portraits (mostly kids), I do a lot of bursts, ...


2

I find burst mode a bit distracting if taking photos in a controlled environment (shooting). The camera shoots without you really being able to control what it shoots. That is when I use the slow burst mode (D90) - with two pictures a second I really can capture a pose redundant and can stop soon enough if it differs from what I like. Downside: (subjective) ...


2

Canon specifies that you can shoot up to 15 JPEG or 6 RAW images or 3 JPEG+RAW files continuously at 4.3 FPS. This is under ideal conditions with focus locked on the first frame. Most importantly, this is measured with a sufficiently fast memory card. Since you are getting so many fewer shots, it is most likely that your card is too slow. You can get faster ...


2

Max FPS measures series of shots taken until internal buffers is completely full. After it's full FPS slows down a lot and is basically limited by card write speed. There is another factor that affects FPS - shutter lag, that may be 50-100ms alone. So only 10 shutter lags would take up a second. Shutter speed should be faster (10x or 100x faster) than ...


2

The most common reason for me to use that mode is when I think I may want to get a couple of shots in a row, but I don't want to accidentally squeeze off two or three shots when I really only want one. At 8fps, the shutter is really sensitive, and it's really easy to wind up taking extra shots unintentionally. I used to experience that even at 6.5fps on my ...


2

Shooting JPG only should be faster than RAW only. Although the camera has to process the JPG, the resulting file is much smaller and generally the memory card is the bottleneck, so smaller files transfer faster and get you a higher rate.


1

Sometimes the 8 fps of the 7D is a little faster than you want to go in burst mode. Even with the Version 2 firmware, you can fill the buffer in about three seconds when saving to RAW files. By reducing the frame rate to 3 fps you can stretch that to around 8 seconds with a fast CF card. I shoot a local high school band. During their halftime show at Friday ...



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