Summer Start

by VonSchnauzer

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15

The faster the transition, the greater the chance of causing damage to your equipment. If you want to protect your equipment from failure due to water(ie condensation issues) a slow gradual transition of about 20mins is the best idea. With that said, I have some tips below and if you follow them, you should be able to safely speed up this process. The issue ...


8

This is pretty common for the GoPro underwater housing. One of the larger GoPro dealers actually has custom made inserts that help with the issue. They call them GoPro Anti-Fog Inserts. This is the description: Prevent your camera's housing from fogging, even in cold temperatures/humid environments. Great value and performance: includes 3 sets of ...


7

You're right, the problem with heating the environment is that it can produce "heat waves" which show up in your photographs if you're not very careful. All in all it seemed like bringing a heater (propane, or otherwise) was something that I was going to have to monitor and fiddle with a lot, so I didn't ever go down the path of trying to keep the ...


7

Cameras handle worse conditions all the time. Chances are very good you just had condensation on the inside of your lens or on the sensor itself. Let it be for a few hours and try again. I wouldn't take the lens off yet, because if the sensor is wet from condensation you'll have a higher chance of having dust adhere to it. If it isn't clear in a few ...


5

Condensation occurs when warm air meets a cold surface and when that air cools down, its ability to carry moisture reduces, so the water will distill and cling to the nearest surface (the same cold one). As long as you don't detach the lens while the inside of your camera is colder, you should be fine. The little amount of air oozing through between lens ...


5

Added: The cure is to ensure that camera surfaces are always at least very slightly higher than ambient air temperature - either by heating or other means. See here for DIY low cost heaters And here re Dew Shields & heaters BUT see at end for an explanation of how the apparently reverse mechanism occurs so that apparently cold air causes condensation ...


4

I'd like to apologize for the rough render with poor detail. This answer does not use any magic, but rather chemistry! Heated UV Protection Filter The lens warmer uses two two fins, each with a hand warmer rubber banded to it to heat the glass element. The heat from the warmers will quickly get the filter element above ambient temperature, at which point ...


4

I have found the best, most practical way to avoid condensation on cameras is to ensure that they are in the same environment for several hours before a shoot. For example, if I plan to shoot at sunset at the beach, I put my camera equipment in the trunk of my car, or on a porch, around 2 or 3pm (several hours before) the shoot. This way the equipment is ...


4

You have to gradually let equalize the temperature. Don't bring the camera and lenses straight from a cold place to a warm place or viceversa: if you'll shoot in the night let the equipment outside some hours earlier. Then, to avoid mist formation, you can put the equipment inside a plastic bag with some silica gel, and only then bring it back home: this ...


4

Typically, for removing moisture from things in general, burying it in rice is well known advice. I have no idea how well this would or wouldn't work for a camera, however.


4

Normally, condensation occurs in a humid environment as a result of the difference of the temperatures of the air and the object on which it occurs. The problem here appears to be a more or less rapid drop in temperature I guess - one solution might be the use of a see-throuh rain cover, or a large enough ziplock bag with appropriate cuts, applied before ...


4

What can I do to prevent fogging within the GoPro case when I take it out on the water? An important assumption that you must confirm is that the condensation is due to moisture present inside the canera at sealing time and is NOT caused by water ingress during operation. IF the camera is sucking in water then you have a pronlem that must be repaired. ...


3

If there is room inside the case a good option would be to place a silica gel pack inside. The silica gel will lower the moisture level inside the case, which will help to prevent condensation. You can also get reusable packs that can be baked to renew. Look for "indicating silica gel" (Example).


2

Technically it can't form inside the sensor (which is just a silicon wafer with etched pathways), but can potentially form inside the sensor package. Of course most people don't make that distinction :)


2

The official anti-fog inserts work well, but are easy to lose during a quick change. And never at an easy time to replace them. At a fix, I've overcome fogging on a number of adventures in South East Asia by simply tearing off strips of tissue paper. For a recent dirtbike trip up into the mountains of Cambodia, the fogging got particularly bad, and we were ...


1

The greatest benefit from including silica gel in your camera bag is to keep the inside of the bag dryer than the outside air when stored at room temperatures that tend to be fairly moist for long periods of time. If you bring your cameras in from a cold environment, particularly sub-freezing temperatures and then bag them in a warm, moist environment ...


1

What I have found: 1) Answer goes from other field: astronomical observation. Phil was right: it should be some heating device. Here is a sample. 2) Super device from DewBuster and hand-made anti-dew system 3) Hand-made without heater (maybe it will work): Anti-Dewer: long tube, horn made from cardboard or plastic, it can be covered from the inside ...


1

When shooting outside in cold temperatures (or even at dawn when the air temperature is close to the dew point, its the warm air inside the lens that is causing the fog. The solution is simple if you have some time. Put the lens in an air tight plastic bag (a bread loaf bag works for long lenses), seal it up, and take the lens outside for a couple of hours. ...


1

My early cars without A/C taught me that in cold, avoid breathing out anywhere towards glass that should remain transparent. The escaping air has been warmed up your body and reaching a colder surface will trigger the dew point, just like Russell has described in his answer. Blow air out via a corner of mouth if the important surface (like a windshield, or a ...


1

Sure, but it isn't as big a problem as to having it inside of your lens. Condensation can occur anywhere there is a surface to attach to. With any electronic part condensation can lead to major issues. With the sensor depending on what else is around it may lead to dried spots on the sensor which would then should be cleaned. I would do everything ...



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