Spring 2012

Spring 2012
by ani

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New answers tagged

2

Just addressing the light tent bit of your question: You can get white plastic shower curtains from ikea for very little money. With bamboo canes form the garden centre (or even chairs) and some tape you can make a pretty servicable table-sized light tent. This works better than a white bedsheet as if it ends up in shot the weave of the fabric can show up....


2

Well you asked a loaded question for sure. Music and photography have a similar language. In order to communicate ideas, you need to know how to speak the language. You also need to have the gear and skills of how to use it. Remember the camera is as dumb as a rock. Ok, here goes. If I told you I was a professional photographer and was asked to write a ...


3

I'm a novice photographer. The best advice I can give is using macro, good lighting and some post production using software's like adobe lightroom. Since you're trying to photograph board games, that usually involve small dice and other tiny 'accessories', I really recommend using the macro mode on your camera. The macro mode is basically a setting in ...


4

To complement other answers: there is a lot you can do in post production as well. Here's what can be achieved after playing 5 minutes in Lightroom: EDIT - after using the dehaze filter:


5

... so what other lighting options do I have? Get flash gear and learn off-camera lighting. Off-camera lighting is the go-to knowledge for most product-photography. You'd have outgrown a light tent pretty fast anyway. Might as well start out with umbrellas and lights on stands with radio triggers, and have all the control. If your advanced compact has a ...


6

Re studio and ": I can't fit an entire board into a small light tent.": for a still-life, you can do without a formal or elaborate "studio". If you use a reasonable tripod, you can take an exposure time that's as long as necessary to handle the "available light". And that's the specific term you can search on for more about available light photography. So, ...


12

I'm not a photography expert at all, but I have spent my whole life playing, buying, and most importantly looking at pictures of games of various kinds. I also have painted many miniatures and developed ways to take good pictures of them without spending a lot of money on serious photo equipment over the years. So here are some thoughts from a gamer ...


10

Get a polarizer filter. You'd typically want the "circular" ones, though in this day and age you'd be hard-pressed to find one that's not. I noticed that your first and third shots show some reflection due to the board's gloss---you can remove that with a polarizer. Though most cameras not featuring an interchangeable lens system don't allow filters to be ...


9

This feedback covers the framing of the shots, less the technical aspect of it. I would dig more into the feedback you got - I was told recently that my image work needed to improve. What is important to the editors? I wouldn´t worry about taking the games outside during winter, unless this is where the boardgames are beeing played. One idea to take the ...


1

I am thinking is there a way by which I can create a blur effect by using the light wind in my favor? There are a lot of possibilities. Some examples: Use a long shutter speed -- several seconds or more -- so that the moving flowers blur into soft shapes and stationary objects like a fence or statue stay sharp. The effect will be like photos you often ...


1

You can actually get the subject sharp. As @clabacchio mentioned, a fast shutter speed can freeze the subject rather well. If the flowers are moving quickly or if you're close enogh, 1/125 will actually not be enough, you'd probably need at least 1/200, and take several shots to pick the sharpest one afterwards. The other obvious option is flash. For ...


1

One thing you can try is to add a still object to the composition, which may be a toy, a garden tool or anything else. Then use a long shutter time, perhaps using a tripod. This will get the flowers blurred and the other subject sharp, which will make it look more intentional. Or, you can just raise your ISO and use a large aperture to get a shutter speed ...


-2

While the question as asked seems to be aimed at style and composition, there may also be a legal aspect: In some jurisdictions, taking (and publishing) pictures of persons (or even their cars with license plates) may be violating the personality rights of those persons unless they are only "bystanders" and not the subject of the photo. So let's say you ...


4

When are people or cars in photos not the subject? When your composition of the scene draws the viewer's eyes to your intended target, rather than to the people or cars. If your intent is to draw attention to the wet pavement, then the wet pavement needs to dominate the composition. If you want to lead the viewer's eyes to a specific element in the scene ...


3

In a picture with a theme all of the compositional elements in the frame should visually speak to & support that theme. When you get that right just about everyone who looks at your picture will intuitively understand what that theme is. Additionally, if one finds its necessary to ask such questions in defense of one's theme, one needs to step back & ...


2

Look at the first sentence of your question and think about why you mention the parking lot before any other subject in the image. Then consider why you mention it at all.


8

I think i can see the point your friend was making. The brightness of the cars and glare from the pavement make the fog and the overcast conditions much less visible. the overcast condition is accentuated in the background much more than in the foreground. Often times the viewer will perceive whatever is in the foreground as the subject. Additionally, they ...


14

What they are trying to tell you, even if they don't realise it or quite know the right language, is that the vehicles/people are a major distraction in the image. If what the viewer perceives as the subject of the image is not what you intended then as the artist you probably need to do some reworking or start over. The objects that viewers see as the ...


2

If you are looking to make the leaves look old then i think they need to be darker. I think the lighting should focus on the watch and the leaves a darker point. Brightness makes things look more "alive" if you will. So the leaves, although dead, look very much alive to me. Here's an example of what i mean. These leaves look very much dead because of the ...



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