Serene Life

by garik

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48

I think Stan said it best in regards to composition and light, but I'll try to be a bit more specific about your pictures. What are you trying to show? This is the most important question to ask yourself before clicking the shutter. If you don't know, or don't address it, the audience won't know either and the picture will look sortof "pointless". Your ...


46

Rule of Odds states that having an odd number of objects in an image will be more interesting and therefore pleasing. In case there is an even number of objects, your brain would have an easy time "organizing" the objects into pairs and therefore bringing in symmetry and dullness. If you have one main object, accompany it with two supporting objects, not ...


45

You can digitally enhance your pictures by increasing the brightness and adjusting the contrast. You can also crop out any parts of the image that don't contribute to the impressive nature of it. Take advantage of angles to convey attributes such as size and distance. Using perspective can also help liven up your images. I think the main concern is that the ...


37

Background: I am a mathematician. The golden ratio certainly exists mathematically, it does appear on occasion in nature (though not as often as people think) and when it does occur then there are proper scientifically falsifiable theories as to why it occurs (the spirals on a pinecone are one example, I believe, though the spirals on a nautilus are not). ...


34

The rule of thirds is actually the golden ratio. It's a number that divides a line into roughly 2/3 and 1/3. In photography it's used to make images more dynamic. If you place the subject in the center of the image, it's percieved as balanced and perhaps dull (unless the subject is very strong in itself), while if you place the subject at one side you add a ...


31

The "diagonal method" appears (as seen on a site dedicated to its advocacy) to have been invented — he says "discovered" — in 2006 by photographer and photography teacher Edwin Westhoff. The "method" is simple. It states that details which are important to the artist will be found — within a very close precision — along an imaginary diagonal line drawn at ...


31

Firstly, you should pose your model. There are ways to accentuate parts of the body naturally. Try posing her arms so that they squeeze the bosom. Another option then is to break all the rules of portrait photography, and instead of using a long lens (that flattens features) use a wider angle (around 24-35mm on full frame maybe) and get closer! By getting ...


30

You've pretty much answered your own question there (except that you don't absolutely need a long exposure, it depends on the situation). The key ingredient is obviously the particulates in the air to reflect the light, but in the shot you've posted also the extreme exposure difference between the incoming sun and ambient light. The greater the difference, ...


30

Bakker's Saddle is a guide, much like the Rule of Thirds, about where to put the subject of your image. To calculate the power points for Bakker's Saddle: Draw a line diagonally from one corner to the opposite corner. Next, draw lines perpendicular to the diagonal that intersect with the other two corners. Place your subject at one of these two ...


29

The rule of thirds is a popular and common compositional guideline for photography and for painting. In its most basic form, the rule of thirds suggests that dividing areas within the frame into thirds is more successful than an even division. For example, the sky should occupy the top third (or two-thirds) of the frame, rather than sharing the space evenly ...


29

I still compose diagonally on a regular basis when shooting bands, I find this maximises what I can get into the frame, and the resulting images work both mounted diagonally and in a regular upright orientation: I agree that presenting other images like this wouldn't work, for example if you do a diagonal composition of a shot with a horizon it will ...


28

There are several good and very thorough technical answers, so I'll try to provide some practical usage of these two guidelines. Neither rule is "better" or "worse" than the other...both are simply general guidelines of composition. A simpler way to compare the two is as so: The Rule of Thirds is a grid division into even thirds (33/33/33). The Golden ...


27

The rule of thirds suggest that you should divide the image area into a 3x3 grid, and then position compositional elements of the image along the lines between those cells, preferably where vertical and horizontal lines meet: |---|---|---| | | | | |---X---X---| | | | | |---X---X---| | | | | |---|---|---| The rule of thirds is a ...


27

You don't need long exposure at all. What you need is: smoke, dust or droplets of water in the air for the "air to shine" rays of light that are significantly brigter than the surroundings to make it visible against the background (dark background really helps here) I have an example of this in church, but if there's strong interest I can try to ...


25

Essentially the Rule of Thirds is a simplification of the Golden Ratio. The golden ratio is about 1.62, but for photography, we'd typically write its inverse, of .62. There is a whole host of stuff on this ratio, but let me just say that it's significant in terms of beauty. The rule of Thirds actually comes from this same source, it's just an approximation ...


24

What is Lead Room? Lead Room (also variously referred to as leading, nose room, or leading space) is a foundational compositional technique that is frequently employed in the visual arts such as cinematography, painting, and of course photography. In essence the 'rule' of lead room is that when framing a subject, well composed shots will include 'white ...


23

You've identified your subject, the tricky part is expressing what you want to say to others in a single picture. What is it you want to say? In your example photo, everything is in focus, there is little contrast between the post and background, and everything has vertical lines. How is the viewer meant to know what parts of the photo are important? What ...


22

One of the best books I can recommend is Michael Freeman's famous book: The Photographer's Eye: Composition and Design for Better Digital Photos This book is a rare gem, in that it does a pretty superb job of covering all the critical artistic topics of photography in a generally agnostic way. Michael Freeman is a talented photographer, and his ...


22

Here is a real world example. I took this shot last night and the way I framed it landed on the Golden Section. I have cropped both images to maintain the same field of view, as pictured. The original was slightly larger but still landed on the GS. Now what happens when you crop to create a composition on the rule of thirds? To me, both have merits, ...


22

Q: When is it OK to place the subject in the middle of a picture? A: Whenever you feel that it works best! The general rule of not centering your subject is time-honored, and comes from one basic idea: the center of an image is a stable, straightforward place. When you put something there visually, it stays there visually, usually resulting in a static ...


21

Probably the most important factor: Shoot from a low angle. If you can get low enough that you can see the sky under the person, it more clearly exaggerates that they are in the air. Alternatively, shoot against a background with clear depth cues - A person jumping on a large, flat plane of a similar color provides no clue that they are actually in the ...


20

This is due to a lack of subject contrast. Your camera's Autofocus system needs to be able to detect an edge in order to know where to focus.


20

Regarding composition, it's important to judge all the things that are in the frame. Everything in the frame either hurts or adds to the picture. In this sample picture, the flower pot and glass pane give a clear hint that the photo is made on a window sill. While people do like to eat in a table near window, only few would consider window sill as a ...


19

Composition: the window pane, blue bowl, and cut-off edges of the plate are distracting. I also find the silver plate itself to be a composition problem: all of the highlights and shadows make it a distracting element. It's dark behind the food -- is this a reflection of you? On the right, behind the lemon reflection is something that looks sort of like a ...


18

There are a lot of "magic numbers" in math, lots of folks are familiar with Pi for example. In this case, the number in question is Phi. Where it comes into visual arts like Photography is that you can construct a very graceful spiral shape that mathematically approximates Phi. Since that curve is viewed as being very graceful and classically beautiful, the ...


18

You need to shoot from an angle - if all the trees/signs are in front of you then they will all appear vertical in the image regardless of the slope. This is actually a well known illusion that gives rise to "gravity hill", a road which slopes downhill but looking head on in the absence of any visual cues the brain interprets it as flat/sloping up, which ...


18

No, you are the artist and you decide what works best in your shots.



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