Sunset in Kruger

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0

As others have pointed out, any EF lens should work on modern EOS digital SLR's. One thing to keep in mind, though, is that they will only look about the same on Full Frame digital SLR's, e.g. 1D, 5D or 6D series, because the sensor in those cameras is similar in size to the size of film exposed in a 35mm film camera. On other cameras, "APS-C" or "crop ...


5

Since Canon introduced the EOS system in 1987, all EOS EF mount lenses will work on all EOS EF (full frame, APS-H) or EF-S (APS-C) mount bodies. This means they will be functional in terms of automatic metering and auto focus. What field of view each lens will yield on a digital body depends on the size of that camera's sensor. For a closer look at that ...


3

Those are all Canon EF mount lenses. They will work with any current Canon DSLR, but are so old you may desire newer versions with newer technology.


0

Yes. The Yongnuo RF-603II triggers are manual-only. This means that they will work to fire any remote flash from any camera, as long as the camera uses an ISO-compatible hotshoe, and the flash uses an ISO-compatible foot: that is, the square arrangement with the rails and at least the central sync/fire signal connections: a pin on the flash foot, and a ...


0

You may find that some lenses (both DSLR or SLR ones) rotate their front element when focusing. If your DSLR does and your SLR doesn't, it may be a pain to use graduated or polarising filters. More info: http://www.ephotozine.com/forums/topic/filters-and-lenses-that-rotate-the-front-element-27373 Also DSLRs don't need UV filters (maybe except to protect ...


1

M42 mount lenses (manual screw mount) can be used on almost any known brand as there are a wide variety of adapters available. This applies to any full frame and any DSLR / System camera that's not a 4/3. Sony can use the "newer" Minolta AF lenses, these were also quite common back in the day. Of course, some older lenses do not have AF and the use of ...


1

YES!!! Definitely! some (polarisers) will work differently but that's just part of the fun. I use red, yellow, orange and blue filters for BW and they work perfectly. Some may argue that this is not necessary as you can filter on colours in post-processing, but postprocessing will definitely diminish the amount of information (bits!) of the image while ...


0

Besides polarization, color filters are the main compatibility problem you are likely to run into between film and digital cameras. While you may not have any color filters for your lenses, watch out for color flash filters. For example, there are some common green gels to match your flash color to fluorescent lights, and orange gels to match incandescent. ...


3

Yes. The only thing you want to look out for is "linear" polarizing filters, which interfere with TTL metering and autofocus. If your old gear doesn't have those features, your polarizing filters might be of the linear type. Newer polarizing filters are of the "circular" type, which doesn't cause problems with modern systems. (Despite the name, "circular ...


0

Current autofocusing lens mounts Each SLR brand has actually had multiple mounts over time, but the current dSLR mounts, except for four-thirds cameras, all have backwards compatibility with the current autofocusing mounts: Pentax K, Nikon F, Canon EOS, and Minolta AF (Sony Alpha). 3rd party lenses may not autofocus correctly and can require rechipping due ...


2

as a committed Pentax user who has had many a good shooting session with M42 screw lenses on Pentax DSLRs, I can't believe I'm about to say this but: While other posters are completely correct that Pentax is awesome for compatibility with old lenses, and the in body image stabilisation is a particular high point, no one has mentioned Canon and that's ...


8

As Matt noted, there's no general reason that you can't use them if the diameters match up with your lens elements. The only thing I would note in addition to that is that you may run into linear polarizers which may not work correctly with your camera's metering and autofocus systems. That's not really an issue for focussing if you manually focus. For ...


8

Yes, there is no reason that these would not work, assuming that their filter diameter matches your lenses, of course. As with lenses in general, there have been improvements in design and manufacturing which may make newer filters nicer. For example better coatings are available, and older filters are less likely to be multi-coated. You may also find newer ...


0

My lens has the same issue, when i opened it i found that 2 of the ribbon cables were broken... they extend and contract as the internals of the lens moves. I ordered replacements on ebay cheap, and set to change them, this proves very very difficult, as you must get the very center of the lens and there are about a billion tiny screws, and re-assembly ...


0

The SF-4000 is a manual-only flash. If you look at the foot, it only has a single pin. This isn't unreasonable for a $20 flash unit. It will fire in sync so that the light will register in the image when you take the shot. But it won't understand 2nd curtain sync, HSS, or eTTL signaling, and it cannot be controlled from the camera menu--that type of ...


2

The dedicated foot may or may not work properly with a newer camera of the same brand. Your best bet would be to get a non-dedicated version, if available for your make and model, and then use that. There are a couple of caveats, though: one is, the flash unit must have its own eye, or it will only fire at full power. If the flash is completely ...



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