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25

Yes, all Pentax DSLRs accept all K-mount lenses. This includes autofocusing (if applicable), focus confirmation, metering, IS, etc. The oldest two series, K and M series (database), do not have aperture contacts, and thus do not work with Av and Tv mode. Instead, you'll have to use M mode, but you will get meter readings. It can also suggest a shutter ...


16

The short answer is: save it as a TIFF. PSD may once have been considered the more "native"/modern Photoshop format, but no longer. Jeff Schewe (the Photoshop Guru's Guru) advised way back in August 2007 on the Luminous Landscape forums that choosing TIFF over PSD was his strong recommendation. I quote: Look, I'll make it REAL simple... TIFF = ...


15

This is a particularly thorny question with Nikon. On one hand, Nikon still uses the same basic mount as their very first SLRs did shortly after the second world war was over. On the other hand, over the years they've had to come up with quite a few variations on that mount. As a result, the exact degree of compatibility between a particular lens and camera ...


15

In talking with a number of working pros, the general attitude tends to be that you buy lenses to keep and you buy bodies to upgrade. My personal planning mirrors this; I've tried to invest in higher quality lenses that i expect to own for a while (10-15 years) while given how body technology is changing, upgrading a body every 2-3 years doesn't surprise me. ...


15

I think this question boils down to a balance between backwards compatibility and technological progress. You can strive to maintain the ultimate in backwards compatibility, and never change a lens mount. Some camera manufacturers have succeeded in that, such as Nikon and Pentax, to a large degree. However, what is the long term cost of progress there? ...


11

Yes, there are. Most DSLRs are backwards compatible with lenses of film DSLR from the same brand. The main exceptions are Olympus, Panasonic and Sony. Canon changed its mount completely when they introduced autofocus, so you will have less luck there. Nikon manual focus lenses are compatible with higher-end bodies (D90, D300S, D7000, D3S, D3X, etc). ...


7

Yes, if it is an old flash, it is possible that the trigger voltage is around 200V. However, according to some information from Chuck Westfall (Canon USA official), all bodies since the EOS 20D should withstand this voltages (I don't have the link, but you can search Google and it will pop up in one of the many forums). To be on the safe side, you can get ...


7

Is it a third-party lens or a Canon one? It is a well known fact that some older Sigma lenses in particular have problems with the electronic interface with newer Canon camera bodies.


7

I don't think my contacts need cleaning because the camera works fine with a 18-55mm lens. You could try cleaning the other side of the contact point, that being the contacts on the lens.


7

Unfortunately not, as this lens does not have a built-in AF motor, and neither do the D3X00 or D5X00 camera families from Nikon. Your camera will only have autofocus with Nikon lenses marked AF-S, or compatible lenses from other makers that include built-in focusing motors.


6

A good lens is a lasting investment that will outlive generations of camera bodies. But you should be aware of these general considerations when buying a lens. The greater the zoom range the lower the resolution, the greater the distortions and the smaller the maximum aperture. This is an unavoidable law of lenses. Thus a prime lens is capable of the ...


6

There is a great summary of K-mount features at Bojidar Dimitor's page. You should look for the "crippled" KAF2 body.


6

Yes it will work. Those cameras don't feature an in body focus motor and won't autofocus with any "AF" lens. Your D80 should be fine with any AF or newer AF-S lens.


6

The Nikon SLR lenses are designed such that the image circle falls on the sensor/film plane based on the distance from the sensor to the mount (flange focal distance). For an SLR, this distance includes the space needed for the mirror. As the Nikon V1 doesn't have a mirror, the distance from the sensor to the mount point is substantially smaller, so in order ...


5

Is your lens autofocus? If so, your new camera will need the autofocus drive - many of Nikon's newer, entry level dslr's don't have one. Most of my older lenses are MF (Manual Focus). I have a 30+ yr old MF Nikkor 135mm that works great on my D700. It's been "AI'd" which means someone cut a notch in the part of the lens's mounting ring so that the newer ...


5

In addition to the K-mount still used on most current Pentax DSLRs (except 645D), there were Pentax 645 and Pentax 67, both are medium formats. Those lenses are quite heavy and you'll need an expensive adapter for them. Before K-mount, Pentax used a screw-mount called M42; you'll need an adapter to use an M42 lens. There's a huge selection of those lenses ...


5

Ignoring issues of mechanical wear on lenses (which is difficult to quantify) and focussing on changes of format etc. the real problem is with changes to the registration distance, the distance from the film/sensor to the lens mount. When Canon moved from the FD to EF mount the registration distance increased and this made the FD lenses incompatible, when ...


5

TIFF is more widely supported. Many programs don't deal with PSD because the format is very complicated. TIFF on the other hand is like a "standard" image format along with JPEG and PNG. Both TIFF and PSD can preserver layers information. Both of them can handle 16 and 32 bit image. However PSD can contain much more than that. Since it is the native ...


5

To cut a long story short, you are using too fast a shutter speed. The shutter consists of two black 'curtains' that travel down over the sensor, one after the other, allowing exposure of the shot. Both these curtains have to be out of the way when the flash fires, otherwise they will block part of the sensor and you get a black bar in your shot. Using a ...


4

The lenses will fit but will not autofocus as the D3100 does not have an in-camera focus motor and requires AF-S lenses for auto focus. If you wish to use AF with your lenses, then you should consider the D7000 or a model with 1 to 3 numbers in its name (D300S, D700, D90, D3S, etc). Note that the angle-of-view of your lenses will be different if you do not ...


4

The Pentax dSLR line supports the entire K-mount lens line up through its history. In addition, with adapters, you can easily use old screw mount (M42 or commonly called the "Pentax" mount) lenses or even Pentax medium format lenses, many of which were top notch. In any event, to use manual lenses with the new Pentax cameras, you just enable use of aperture ...


4

It depends. The Canon flashes you listed in your question use pulsed light from the Master unit to tell the Slave units when to fire and how much power to emit. This allows proprietary communication between the Master and Slave units and allows for use of Canon's E-TTL automatic exposure system as well as permits the photographer to set manual power levels ...


3

The SB-24 will fire but you will not be able to use the TTL-mode. Nikon changed their flash exposure protocol when they introduced the latest DSLRs. A (auto) mode will work fine, as will M (manual).


3

If you buy a high-quality AF G lens today for your Nikon, it should still be perfectly useful with a new body in a few years. The odds of Nikon doing an overhaul of the lens mount in that time seem slim. That's one big upside of SLRs/DSLRs; you can buy lenses and bodies independent of each other.


3

As the SP AF 17-50mm F/2.8 XR Di II VC LD is a Di II it has reduced image circle coverage and it will most likely display severe vignetting on 35mm film or a digital camera with a 35mm sized sensor such as the D700 or D3 series.


3

It certainly looks like you can get the adapters - a quick check on ebay revealed this one. Though I can't verify how good it is, etc...


3

This particular model looks like a generic, "dumb" slave that will work with anything. Look at the list of brands it supports, and it calls itself "universal". So, yes, it's very likely that it will work. Some flashes are "dedicated": they work with a specific system only. If you buy a third-party flash — that is, not from your camera brand directly — the ...


3

It depends on what you call "work". The flash does not support PTTL, so you'll get a flash that will require you to operate it (or your camera?) manually (to enter ISO, length, apperture, shutter speed, etc.). The documentation writes "Flash control: Automatic at F2.8", so it is not clear how you adjust it for other appertures or ISO values. If you are ...


3

You would have to upgrade Lightroom or Elements, as only the latest versions support the 6D. The Canon 6D requires Camera Raw 7.3, which is compatible with Lightroom 4.3 Photoshop CS6 According to Adobe, Photoshop Elements 11 only supports ACR 7.0-7.2. However, it appears the 7.3 update may be applied to PS Elements 11.



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