Lightnings taking a ride

by ceinmart

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12

Let's start with what is similar with all three of these lenses: They all have a focal length of 50mm. You should also be able to have a lot of overlapping focusing distances and aperture values. Now, to what's different. When it comes to a zoom lens, they tend * to have a different maximum aperture values that are smaller than with a prime. The ...


12

Portra is a low-contrast, low-saturation film made primarily for wedding and portrait photographers (it's the successor to Vericolor III Professional). It's designed to capture the details in both the white wedding dress and the black tuxedo at the same time, while rendering pleasing, blemish-minimized skin tones. There's nothing special about its grain ...


11

I've got good news and bad news for you. And I'll start with the good: we are in the midst of a golden age of cameras, from every tier from entry-level to the enthusiast models you are looking at to the top of the line medium format options. There are hundreds of options which easily get an "excellent" rating in all the categories you describe. And you don't ...


8

Get your hands on the cameras in question. The choice between mirrorless and dSLR isn't one of image quality or return-on-cost. It's about handling. I tend to make the analogy that a dSLR is like a big red toolbox and a P&S is like a swiss army knife. If I'm going to overextend that analogy, mirrorless is like using a tool belt. Which tool you want ...


6

The truth is that any such decision is about compromise. You cannot have any one camera that is best for all 1 to 6 points you mentioned and do not think you can add weight as 7! Look at your requirements one-by-one and see what is best for each of them. Then choose a camera which achieves a good balance among these: Image quality: Resolution is the ...


5

To answer question 1, a large difference between phone and compact cameras is the lens. Phones typically have simple lenses with few elements which are designed to fit flush with the phone's body. Compact cameras more often than not have lenses which extend from the body when the camera is turned on, allowing them to be complex (having multiple elements to ...


5

If the choice is based over which camera allows me to produce better photos, I'd choose the 5D mark III over the 70D hands down and never look back. I regularly use both a Canon 7D and a Canon 5D mark II. When I am shooting with only one body it is almost always the Full Frame 5DII. To my eyes there is a visible difference between images made with each ...


5

I only have odd numbered 5Ds, but the pixel pitch is very similar between the 5DmkII and 5D mkIII so the results ought to hold up. Here's the same scene shot using a tripod under the same lighting, 1/8s exposure ISO 100, f/1.2 (using the Canon 85L). RAW, converted with ACR with the same settings (everything on zero with a linear tonecurve). I shot pairs of ...


5

There are two main things I can think of, the first is the autofocus. On a DSLR, the mirror reflects light on to a Phase Detect Auto Focus sensor while you are looking in the view finder. While PDAF isn't as accurate as contrast based detection (which can be done with a standard CMOS sensor) it is much faster. Since mirrorless lack the mirror, they ...


4

This is not an answer, just a "comment" to the question about shot-to-shot cycle times when camera is set to single-shot mode. The claim made in the question is that even the slowest DSLRs are faster than the fastest mirrorless cameras in this single-shot mode. Here is some of those cycle times in a list for easy comparing, brought up from the review-site ...


4

According to Kodak, Supra was discontinued over 10 years ago : http://www.kodak.com/global/en/professional/support/techPubs/e2519/e2519.pdf So if your store is still carrying Supra, check the expiration dates on the boxes. For Kodak, you now have the choice of Portra 160, 400, or 800 or Ektar 100. For Fuji, it looks likes the only choice you have is ...


4

In the Comparison view you have the "Select" image on the left and "Candidate" image on the right. By clicking on either image you will get a white border/line around the image. It's only this image that the "X" key will act upon, not both. If it's the "Select" image then it will be flagged as rejected, if its the "Candidate" image then it will be flagged ...


3

How outdated is the [1D] Mark III compared to other Canon or Nikon cameras in the low/mid price range? A bit. But in other ways, not at all. The biggest advances since 2007 have been in high ISO performance and resolution on the sensor. Comparing a 10MP 2007 APS-H sensor to a current 20MP ASP-C or full frame sensor is going to be a bit like comparing ...


3

I tested both of them; Kodak Portra 160 ISO and Superia 200 ISO. As a first reaction, I think that I love Portra. The main reason is the fine grain — Portra leads to a better grain result than Superia. Also, the color palette, in my opinion, is better in case of Portra (resulting in pastel colors). Basically that is what I am looking for right now — ...


3

I have been using a Sony NEX-5R for around an year, and I have played with a friend's Nikon D5300 for a few days. That makes me not the most qualified person to answer your question — that would be someone who has used both an SLR and a mirrorless camera for years. But almost everything I say below is verifiable, so you don't have to take my word for it. ...


2

When I do such photos I alway use: a tripod to make sure the photo shows the same especially in the corners M-Mode with fix ISO-Settings to make sure exposure is same (be careful with fluctuating available light) Often but not alway I use flash and "kill" the available light to avoid light fluctuations. To analyses distortions I often use checkered ...


2

Assuming from your question that you would be able to afford both of them, I'd say you could look at the problem as a matter of packaging and not of imaging. Let me try an analogy with the use of computers. Few would argue that a desktop, a laptop, a tablet and a smartphone are all equal in terms of how you use and what can you do with them. But if you ...


2

This is a perfect example of the term "depth of field" being misused. You don't actually want shallow depth of field for portrait shots - it's annoying and can make things difficult if you have more than one subject. What you want is subject isolation with a nice blurred background. Mattdm has demonstrated the depth of field is neigh on identical with these ...


2

I don't have these lenses to actually compare, but by the math, it works out to be virtually identical (presuming you accept the slightly different framing). Using an online depth-of-field calculator, it works out like this: close limit far limit total DoF 30mm f/1.4 1.89m 2.12m 0.24m 35mm f/2.0 1.89m ...


1

Just to put things into perspective, I own a Canon 5Ds, released mid July 2015. it is the first 50MP full frame camera from Canon. Last weekend, I went to a commercial shoot of two simultaneous weddings at a golf club. the project was to show the golf courses capabilities. Now naturally, I used the Canon 5Ds, and for my assistants, one of the very juniors ...


1

It's what the person does that makes a good photograph, not the equipment. That is, the composition, timing, inspiration, the story they want to tell, the way they control the camera to achieve the desired effect are the key things that make a good image. Consider all the iconic photographers from 40 years ago or more, Henri Cartier Bresson, Don McCullin, ...


1

See here for a detailed comparison. You have to reevaluate the pros and cons they mention based on your own preferences, you should not take the overall rating at face value. E.g. if I were to choose then the fact that the Olympus has a significantly higher resolution screen (1,400k dots vs 921k dots) would not matter one iota to me, but for someone else ...


1

Here is an example of the Sony Zeiss 35mm f/2.8 on the A7ʀ at f/5.6: And here's a crop of the extreme bottom left corner (right click -> "view image to see it at 100%"): Sharpness in the corners is very impressive for a 36 megapixel sensor. Chromatic aberration is well handled by lightroom, I've not had any problems with it I don't have the Loxia to ...


1

It's the good old question. Should I go FX or not? If money isn't an issue then go FX. Better image quality, better low-light performance, far less noise and better video quality (you never know maybe you will also get hooked on video production) and it easier to sync it with strobes so you can use it in a studio. The only downside is the weight and cost of ...


1

I recently had a fairly lengthy debate about the whole issue of pixel pitch, ISO performance, and aperture on the Canon Rumors forums. Suffice it to say, while I did not necessarily change my opinion (my angle on the debate was different than that of my opponent), I found the following article on "Equivalence" to be quite enlightening, and expanded my ...



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