Antarctica

Antarctica
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New answers tagged

-1

The Panasonic Lumix DMC-TZ70 would be a good option. The Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-WX500 would also do. It's a less expensive option with the same size and zoom, but with a bit fewer features.


0

One difference is ergonomics. Many modern smartphones have rather large screens, and are designed to be very slim. So this may not be an easy shape to hold while taking a photo. Whereas compact camera are typically smaller, but thicker, so a better shape to hold steady in the hand. Compact cameras have physical buttons, at least for the shutter, and often ...


3

Here are just some examples. Low light photography You say that your main concern is low light photography. This is actually an area which will show a significant difference. On a continuum between very small sensors and large sensors, cellphone cameras are at the very bottom of the pile. Compact cameras have pretty small sensors, so they too have a ...


1

The CHDK (Canon Hack Development Kit) can be used with any of the supported Canon point and shoots and scripts to enable intervalometer shooting for time-lapse sequences. See: http://lifehacker.com/5942229/unlock-the-secret-pro-features-of-your-canon-point-and-shoot-camera-with-chdk


1

The feature you are looking for is Interval Timer. For most cameras this means choosing the number of shots, an interval and a start delay. Some cameras also allow multiple shots at each intervals but I have only seen that in high-end models. To find which compact camera supports this, use the Camera Search page at Neocamera (FD: The digital camera site I'...


1

On start up most cameras extend their lenses. They extend even more when zooming. Effectively the camera is increasing its air volume as it zooms and decreases it as it retracts. The air for this increase in volume is drawn in around the telescoping lens sections drawing in dust. Some cameras have better dust seals than others. I was put off from buying a ...


1

The two terms you probably want to google are mirrorless and large-sensor compact. These cameras will typically cost roughly the same as a dSLR entry-level kit, and will offer some serious tools for photography you won't find in a low-end compact camera, such as full manual mode, a flash hotshoe, and RAW capability. And a larger sensor. Mirrorless ...


-1

Actually these goals are what mirrorless cameras aim to achieve. They have the large sensor and full manual control of dSLRs. But they also have the compact size of point & shoots, since they don't have the mirror and optical viewfinder of the dSLRs.


0

Page 200 of the SX240HS/SX260HS manual, under the section "Playback on a Standard-Definition TV" states, When the camera and TV are connected, you can also shoot while previewing shots on the larger screen of the TV. To shoot, follow the same steps as when using the camera screen. It is not clear from the manual if that capability exists only when ...


0

Just take your own measurements You don't really need complete response curves, just single data points for the leds you use. Compare photos of your leds set to multiple power levels. Shoot in manual mode, in case your camera does some tricks and effects to "improve" the result. If using JPEG, apply reverse gamma function to obtain linear intensity values....


3

There isn't any such thing unless you have a camera which outputs RAW images. For all cameras the internal preprocessing (which generates the JPGs) applies responsivity corrections before you ever see the data. I doubt you'll find a camera in that cost range which has RAW output. Now, as a Systems Engineer and Analyst, I always ask: What is the problem ...



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