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27

The iPhone 4s alongside iOS5 makes a very compelling argument against a standard point and shoot camera in addition to a phone. The backside-illuminated CMOS sensor included in the iPhone 4s(iPhone) is the same sensor found in the Sony Ericsson Xperia Arc and the Xperia Neo. Both of these cameras have faired very well in low-light comparison tests. Recent ...


19

No. The sensor size plays a major part in bokeh. Sensor dimensions of your dSLR are about 3 times bigger than sensor of the compact, so a photo taken with compact's 5.1mm f/2 will look similar to one taken at 16mm f/6.3 using APS-C sensor. Also, the shorter focal length will reduce bokeh effect, because wider angle of view means more background has to fit ...


18

The camera doesn't know what the most important parts of the image are, and therefore what you would like to have in focus. Traditionally autofocus systems have simply selected the closest object near the centre of the frame and focussed on that. This can easily fail in the presence of irrelevant foreground details. Face detection makes the assumption that ...


14

Against a bridge camera or high-end compact, the arguments are straightforward: a larger sensor gives better image quality, and interchangeable lenses give more flexibility. For dSLR vs. one of the mirrorless alternatives, it's more complicated, but there's two broad reasons here as well: technology maturity and system maturity. Under technical maturity: ...


12

Unless it's a specific event "for compact/phone camera users only", don't stress the equipment part that much - that's not what photography is about, and some normal people have dSLRs too. Since you have a short talk, choose 3 to 5 ideas and cover them with examples rather than dash through as many tips as you can. You can't fit a whole beginner's course ...


12

For a long time there were no large or even medium size compacts but now they are starting to appear in numbers, with cameras like the Sigma DP1, Fuji X100 leading the way. Most of these cameras are on the large side and feature prime lenses. There are a number of interchangeable lens compacts with a variety of sensor sizes from the very small pentax Q (5x ...


11

The problem with the photo is that the image is under exposed. The camera's meter tries to make everything an 18% gray and, well, that snow looks about an 18% gray to me so the meter was working 'correctly'. There are a couple different options to look for with this. The first is to find a camera that has a snow or beach mode. An example of what this can ...


10

I own an Xperia Neo which one of the posters before listed as one of the phones with the same sensor as the iPhone 4S. Do I use the camera? A lot! But as always, if this "suffices" really depends on your requirements for a carry-everywhere camera. In the regard that you nearly always have it with you, the iPhone certainly wins. If you will be happy with ...


10

There are 98 current models in my database which are known to use an ND filter. I do not think enumerating them would serve much purpose. Some manufacturers do not specify if an ND filter is used or not, so there are probably more. There are models of a variety of sizes but most are ultra-compacts, followed by ultra-zooms. Fuji and Casio have the most such ...


9

Even keeping the same sensor size and lens parameters you will always save space by fixing the lens. You remove the need for a lens mount interface, lens barrels can be smaller as they gain stiffness from being fixed, you can put some of the lens mechanisms (zoom and focus motors) into the camera body, use leaf shutters instead of focal plane (Sony RX1). So ...


8

Like, perhaps, a Fujifilm XX100 12 megapixel. APSC. This essentially meets your spec. The others below are getting a bit closer to SLRs. specifications here Also look at: NEX-7: Then see NEX5 and NEX 3. And [Olmpus](Start here and work down :-). Panasonic And Olympus


8

The answer is simpler than you think. GPS is not included because the manufacturer does not feel it would sell more cameras. It's the same reason they skimp on camera straps. If it does not sell more cameras, it is not needed, the manufacturer can sell it for less - even just a bit less - or pocket the difference. Personally I could not care less about ...


8

It would help if you said which camera model you're currently using, since different compact cameras (even from the same era, manufacturer and price range) can have wildly different feature sets. That said, let me list a couple of options that you're fairly likely to have available. As other answers have noted, you camera may have a "snow mode" that tries ...


7

I use the Canon SX20IS with incredible results (You can take a look at my gallery here). The camera uses four AAA batteries, has a 20x zoom, and has just been replaced by the new Canon SX30IS which has a 35x optical zoom. The quality of the photos are high, and there are a lot of options in Manual mode. It also supports external flashes.


7

The problem is probably multifaceted. You mentioned that the image was more grainy at the limit of the optical zoom. The LX5 has a variable aperture, from f/2.0 down to f/3.3, which would mean you either need a slower shutter speed or a higher ISO to compensate. If you use a lower shutter speed, its more likely that you'll introduce camera shake, and if ...


7

Absolutely, there are good reasons to choose a compact camera, just like there are good reasons to choose a mirrorless. The key when looking at anything is deciding which reasons are important to you. Size: A compact camera is, well, compact. A mirrorless camera's body may be compact but once you add a lens, it will often be double the thickness of a ...


7

As long as you understand that your size constraint is limiting how much quality you can have, the one you are looking for is the Canon Powershot S110. It measures 27mm at the thickest point and yet has both a slightly larger sensor than usual and much brighter F/2 aperture at wide-angle, only it goes down F/5.9 on the telephoto end. As a bonus, it is ...


7

The main differences between compact cameras and DSLRs are mainly 3: Sensor size: compact cameras have small sensors, that give you little space to play with shallow depth of field, and give you a smaller dynamic (the ability to catch in the same shot bright and dark objects keeping details in both). Ability to use multiple, different, lenses: above a ...


7

So, besides using film with different ISO, how could you change exposure in these cameras? Were you limited to just one? If your camera didn't have any electronics or user controls, it's likely that it really was limited to a single aperture and shutter speed setting. That shouldn't be surprising -- the same is true of single-use disposable film ...


6

I believe the camera sold on Photojojo is actually made by NeinGrenze, and is listed on that website as the 5000T model. This tilt-shift style camera does not technically fit the "tilt-shift" definition in my opinion. The reason being that it is a fixed lens, therefore you do not have the option to actually do any tilting or shifting. You are forced to ...


6

About 2 years ago I found myself in exactly the same situation and created a PowerPoint show of points with images to show the good and the bad of each subject. I found the key is KISS ... Keep It Short & Simple! Here is the text from my presentation, I hope you find it helps ... Digital Is Free! (virtually) Taking one shot or twenty shots is ...


6

They are simple ND filters which simply slide in an out of the optical path. You will notice that those cameras only offer two (or four for double ND filters) apertures at any given focal length. That is because they have a fixed attenuation unlike polarizing filters.


6

Speed: many P&S and even these newer bridge cameras take time to initialize as well as focus and take a shot. This can be frustrating when you want the shot NOW! when the action is occurring. This can be especially true when the camera is off. DSLRs start up quickly, but more important, when you push the shutter button, the shot happens, instantly. ...


6

It depends on your perception. In absolute terms, the quality is drastically better on a DSLR. Modern small sensors show noise and muddied details even at their base ISO when you look at pixels. Now take a DSLR image and one from a small-sensor camera and print a 4x6 out of it and you will see fewer differences. You might even consider them close. Remember ...


6

In short, pretty much yes! In detail, there are several issues involved and noise performance is only one. The point is, in low iso you might not feel the noise difference comparing to a higher sensor but one fact that some people forget is the depth of field. I made it bold because it has bold effect on your photos. The shallow dof that a big sensor can ...


6

Simple, because the lens is proportional to the sensor. The larger, the sensor, the bigger the area it needs to project. This means that longer lenses would be, well, bigger and therefore the camera too would get bigger. The cameras you mention is a great example but take a look at the Sony RX10. It uses the sensor of the RX100 II and puts it behind a ...


5

That's an easy search on Neocamera, there are 26 ultra-zooms that run on AAs. When you said with zoom, I assume you meant an ultra-zoom since all cameras today have optical zoom anyways. Among the compact models, the Canon Poweshot SX130 is a good entry-level camera and has full manual controls for creative uses. Ultra-compacts with AAs are more rare and ...


5

Some things that come immediately to mind: Rule of thirds - don't always center the "subject" in the frame. Don't try to frame too closely in camera - given the high resolution of most cameras these days, better to leave a little space around the edges, rather than accidentally cut off someone's head. Learn what the "modes" on your camera are for - if ...


5

Some things I always stress are: Expect a delay between when you press the shutter release and when the image is captured and learn to anticipate it. Be certain to remove the images from your memory card, transferring them to the computer. Try to focus on the image you are about to make instead of admiring the previous one you are looking at on the LCD ...


5

Of course — there has to be. Are you aware of the saying "Fast, cheap, good: pick two?" Any design has compromises. This isn't a "marketing reason" — it's a basic fact of making products which the market researchers must work from. And when you add the additional constraint that it must be compact, well, something else has to give. Take a look at my recent ...



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