Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway

Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway
by Saaru Lindestokke                

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2

I believe MacAdam Ellipses would shed some light on what you're looking for. Another link which also contains a graphical representation: http://www.kurabo.co.jp/el/world/en/room/color/page1_3.html Long story short: changing color X by "percentage" a can cause it to be perceived differently, while changing color Y by the same percentage would not.


0

If I understand your question correctly, you are asking whether digital photographic camera can produce colors invisible to the human eye. If that's the case, images produced by digital cameras can after processing in a raw converter contain colors that are invisible to the human eye, if you convert using color space with a large color gamut like the ...


1

The answer would always strongly depend on the tool you are using, but what you need to do logically is separate the color you want to work with out, for example by using more or less sophisticated selection tools in your software; or by splitting to three separate images for R, G, B (even elementary software can do that, like PSP 7) modify the contrast of ...


2

You are using the wrong term to define what you wish to accomplish. The examples you show are different due to the increased SATURATION of the hue of the sky. Sliders in most every software for image manipulation allow you to choose the specific colour channel and to effect the change you wish. There are three variables when talking about any specific ...


3

selecting the "Adobe Standard" profile causes the contrast in the blues to be quite noticeably higher than the "Camera Standard" profile I suppose that you should shift blue primary towards magenta and make it less saturated in camera calibration tab. Adobe profiles are essentially a combination of matrix and HSL map. The main difference between camera ...


6

You could change contrast of individual channel by curves. I'm not sure if this is what you want though, because it will throw out the image color balance. Instead of changing contrast you can change lightness or saturation. This can be easily done in LR - there is a set of individual HSL color sliders for that. If you still want to change contrast and ...


1

I think the quickest way to do that would be to use the adjustment brush and draw the effect in the desired area. Choosing the area by globally selecting the desired color (or hue, for example), means all areas with that color in the image are affected. This can lead to strange situations like changing the contrast in the sky means changing the contrast in ...


1

There is one advantage with two big "Ifs". If you are sure that what you do in-camera meets your artistic vision satisfactorily without the need to later shift the relation in grey tonal values between objects of different colors: If you are saving the images as JEPG only files: Then saving the jpegs in B&W will significantly reduce the file size of ...


3

Both approaches are correct. At least as I understand what I think you are trying to say. I'm not sure, though, what you mean by, "(4 time bigger)". Raw luminance values are monochromatic in the sense that there is only one intensity value for each sensel (what we call a pixel well). But every one of those monochromatic luminance values is the result of ...



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