Serene Life

by garik

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0

If you know the color beforehand, it's pretty simple. Create a new layer and fill with the desired color. Change the blending mode to "difference". Now you can create a mask from the composite, invert so the desired color is white in the mask and use curves to make everything else black. If you use another method from one of the other answers, you can still ...


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Some of the answers here discussed a more complex question: what is the optimal mapping of more than 4 colors into a 3 component image. This is a very subjective question. From an artistic standpoint, there is no good answer. But from an engineering standpoint, one can use compression algorithms. A very basic algorithm for multiple band compression is ...


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As said before me, there is no standard on this. With that in mind, I will give you one of the most popular IR color compositions. The composition is called CIR (color infra-red) And it uses IR->R G->G B->B There is a known phenomena in vegetation called the 'red edge' which causes vegetation to reflect more light in a narrow spectrum in the IR due to ...


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Specialized astronomy software typically converts three channels taken in different filters (e.g. three of the 'wide band' Johnson UBVRIJHK.... filters spanning ultra-violet to 2.5 microns and beyond) to RGB channels that humans can see. Photographic imaging software thinks of images in three colors (I believe), as off-the-shelf cameras take three color ...


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I'm afraid there is no one-size-fits-all answer to this question, as mapping of incoming light values to output pixel values is never 1-to-1, not even for plain visible light photos. You can start by reading about gamma correction and tone mapping. Typically, the exact mapping will vary depending on the content of the photograph. I suspect you will have ...


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Sodium vapor lights lamps come in two types - there is the low pressure which is nearly yellow (589.0 nm and 589.6nm) and the high pressure which produces a more pinkish tone which has a few other elements doping it and resulting in a more 'natural' color rendition. The low pressure one is trivial to filter out with a common filter for photography, and the ...


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Why not simply configure the white balance in your camera or in post production? Take an image of a white balance card, and simply use that to set Custom Whitebalance in your camera, or if shooting RAW, use the image of the card to set the balance across all similar shots


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See How does the colour of ambient lighting affect colour rendition?, because that question uses a sodium vapor light as an example. As the answers there explain, sodium vapor lights produce a very, very narrow spectrum of light: CC-BY-SA image from Wikimedia Commons, author Philips Lighting And in fact, this is effectively monochrome. Your only options ...


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Light is composed of many wavelengths even when one is predominant such as in street lighting, thus I doubt a filter will work very well. Try wrapping a black bag around the street light or finding some other way to block the light. Light painting at night relies upon overpowering the ambient light with the lighting used. So you will need to experiment with ...


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As mentioned above your printers gamut is measurable with special software. I use X-Rite's i1Profiler to do that, in combination with an iSisXL in my lab. After measuring the target and building an ICC profile for your printer if your on a Mac simply double click the ICC profile and select the gamut view. If you want to compare gamuts just do the same to ...



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