Napioa - Wind Origins

Napioa - Wind Origins
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1

There is one advantage with two big "Ifs". If you are sure that what you do in-camera meets your artistic vision satisfactorily without the need to later shift the relation in grey tonal values between objects of different colors: If you are saving the images as JEPG only files: Then saving the jpegs in B&W will significantly reduce the file size of ...


2

Both approaches are correct. At least as I understand what I think you are trying to say. I'm not sure, though, what you mean by, "(4 time bigger)". Raw luminance values are monochromatic in the sense that there is only one intensity value for each sensel (what we call a pixel well). But every one of those monochromatic luminance values is the result of ...


1

Another difference: pulsing artifacts when used for stage lighting. LEDs arrays are dimmed/colored by being pulsed at full power rather than run continuously at partial power. While this is also how modern tungsten dimmers work, tungsten (and phosphor-based LEDs) tend to produce light that is an average of the power input. The RGB composition LEDs in ...


0

An oldie question but here I go. A total NO will be my answer. 1) I could be picky on this first point. A RGB value normally can be on a 256 level scale. A CMYK percentage can have "gaps" if you define them directly. Although it has 256 levels internally you have a 100 level scale when you are defining CMYK values. 2) Ok Let us forget that first point. ...


4

It can definitely be a problem, especially if the LED lights in question are not white LED lights. White LED lights, at least the higher quality ones, put out enough red, green, and blue light to work fairly well for most cameras. The results might not be as ideal as a fuller spectrum light source, but you can usually get pretty close. Typical high quality ...


4

The real answer is 'depends'. White LED usually consists of phosphor (react with the chip emission) layered on a diode (such as GaN, which emits violet light 405nm) that's why they are white. The phosphor gets activated by the light from the chip and emits another wavelength of light, hence different colour in a mixture to produce white. Wavelength of ...


1

My conclusio after investigations and a lot of trying on my own is, that labs are using Software mostly set to auto-correct the image (e.g whitebalance, tinting). Thats why sometimes images of the same roll are looking different in color cast, depending on how "good" the Software was able to calculate whitebalance etc. Scanning cross processed film at home ...


1

I would like to have them reprinted but would like to have them printed on the same paper as they were originaally. Are there any labs that will do this? You'd have to confirm that the original paper is still in production -- it might not be. But as long as it is, any lab that's willing to do custom work should be able to do it for you. Googling ...


1

Open the image in to Photoshop Create adjustment layer for hue and saturation Fade/increase the saturation Paint with black on the layer mask to hide/reveal the color Create another adjustment layer if you required more modifications


1

Including a white balance card in a test picture of the rug should help greatly (card in same light as the rug). Then you simply click the white balance tool on that card to remove any color cast from the lighting. Apply this correction to all session pictures (in same lighting). This of course assumes all of your lighting is of the same type, no mixed ...


3

Using a color reference card, like an X-Rite Color Checker, may be something to add to the workflow if it's not already being used. Having a reference against which you can correct the color values helps with getting the color consistent and accurate, vs. correction via eyeballing. Creating camera profiles with the reference card is also very useful, ...


1

It is handy to do the following: open in program create new layer set the blending mode of new layer to "saturation" paint the new layer with black or white (or any other colour with zero saturation) with varying brush opacity to make colour look pale use eraser to cancel effect completely or partially use layer opacity to control the overall effect


0

Yes, the "spot Healing" tool is appropriate for removing unwanted items on an even-toned area. (It can also work on textured areas, but that takes practice.) For example, in the attached image, it would be easy to use the spot healing tool to remove the kite from the sky area, however, the kite string over the rock would be a little tricky, though it could ...


2

Yes, it is very easy to fix with most photo editor software. Here I used Photoshop Elements and the Spot Healing Brush tool to blend out the purple spot.



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