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58

Fluorescent lights can flicker at twice the frequency of the current feeding them, which implies an entire cycle of the flicker will take between 1/100 and 1/120 second. During each cycle the light's intensity and its color temperature can change. Thus, if you're using a shutter speed of 1/100 second or faster, you might observe exactly these phenomena: ...


28

Given the current state of the art, the noise in the blue channel is a combination of cascading effects that work together to make the blue "look" the worst. First, with the Bayer pattern setup, there are twice as many green pixels as red or blue ones in the matrix*. This immediately puts the blue and red at a spacial disadvantage as compared to the green ...


27

Don't feel bad. Color theory isn't easy. First, many of your terms come from the many different ways to express a color. What we typically call a "color" (like, 'red' or 'orange') can be expressed in a variety of different ways: RGB: The combination of red, green, and blue light that forms a color. This is also called additive color (when you add more ...


26

The trick is very easy, actually: bring your own lighting. The existing orange sodium-vapor lighting is missing important parts of color spectrum, so those colors will never be reflected from anything. Filtering will only further reduce the colors available for recording. The "good" examples in the question look very much like one would get with a couple ...


25

I'm going to give two answers which appear to be in conflict but which actually aren't: There are dark yellows and bright violets — we're just not used to seeing them. There aren't and can't be dark yellows or bright violets — and here's why. OK... 1. There are dark yellows and bright violets Color perception is relative. Here is a demonstration. If ...


25

I think "several fluorescent fixtures that I use to light my studio" is the key here. I'm guessing that the very high ISOs are accompanied by very short shutter speeds. Fluorescent lights cycle, and there are color variations within the cycle. Repeat your test with incandescent light or sunlight (or a strobe with high-speed sync). See Do fluorescent ...


24

Different light sources have different color temperature and when you want natural colors, you need to correct them for that particular light source. Basically white balance says what is rendered as neutral gray. You can find a more thorough explanation here: http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/white-balance.htm. Wikipedia lists different light ...


24

Check out this image by Jeff Schewe from wikipedia. It's a 2D slice of what's really a three-dimensional space, but it makes the basic concept clear: So: sRGB is a subset of AdobeRGB, which is a subset of ProPhoto RGB. You can also see how ProPhoto RGB extends outside of the curved shape which represents visible colors. And you can see how AdobeRGB is a ...


23

I think there are subjects and shots that work much better in monochrome than in color. There are others that don't. For pictures where the color itself is a major component of the picture (e.g., rainbows, sunsets) color is essentially always preferable. In other cases, however, a monochrome image can can eliminate distractions and do a much better job of ...


22

Fluorescent lights are terrible news for photography, and this is just one of the reasons! They give out light which is missing a big chunk of the red spectrum, which can make skin tones look greenish and unhealthy, they are usually different colours from each other even if the tubes are the same type, and they change colour during the power cycle! Your ...


22

sRGB is the most common color-space used anywhere. AdobeRGB is a wider color-space which can represent more colors but with less precision when looking at the colors which overlap sRGB. Neither color-space really matters when shooting RAW. The embedded thumbnail or preview within a RAW file may be affected by the choice of color-space though, so keeping ...


20

A JPEG may start out with 8 bits per R, G and B channel, but when stored in the JPEG it is stored very differently, where there is no real "bit depth" but instead values are stored as frequency coefficients of a given precision. In JPEG what's more relevant is the quantization rate, which affects how much information is thrown away during the quantization ...


20

If Matt's answer about the nature of vibrance is correct (and the Adobe documentation agrees), you may be able to obtain a similar effect in GIMP. However, I don't have any Adobe software, so I can't judge how closely this actually matches Adobe's effect. Use Colors -> Components -> Decompose, decompose to Hue/Saturation/Value or Hue/Saturation/Luminance. ...


20

mattdm has it spot on - it's not the colour temperature that matters, it's the width of the spectrum. Here are some examples that illustrate the difference nicely. Here's an image I shot a while ago at a bonfire. Straight of camera, without the white balance set it looks massively orange: And here's an image shot just now under sodium vapour streetlights ...


19

There are many different types of color blindness. Which one are you? In my case I have serious issues discriminating small differences in hues in the red, orange, yellow, green region of the spectrum (deuteranomaly, I read). This happens to me pretty often; invited for dinner last weekend, I identified the hostess's new wall color as orange, not yellow. ...


19

The type of lighting, the way the subject reflects light, presence of haze, the lens design and coatings and the dyes used in the sensor all have an influence on the vividness of colours in an image. But the major factor, which outweighs all of these by a significant margin, is how the image is processed. Either in camera or on a PC the saturation settings ...


19

The question is whether the colors and tones are okay; this is clearly very subjective, and the answer for many people is a shrug and a "sure". But this is your image, and you're the artist, so the question is: does it match your intent? Are you happy with it? Does it communicate what you want to communicate? And, without more information from you, we ...


18

I'm color blind (or rather have a color vision deficiency). Specifically my eyes are less sensetive to red light than other colors. I can't really say that I suffer from it. It makes it harder to pick lingonberries, and I have problem reading tiny red text on a black background, but that's about it. I might perhaps photograph red objects differently, as I ...


18

When discussing the number of colors perceptible to the human eye, I tend to refer to the 2.4 million colors of the CIE 1931 XYZ color space. It is a fairly solid, scientifically founded number, although I do admit it may be limited in context. I think it may be possible for the human eye to be sensitive to 10-100 million distinct "colors" when referring to ...


18

The reason is that the red light is a light source, therefore it's much brighter than any other parts of the scene. The pixels showing it are overblown - meaning there was more light coming than your camera sensor could capture. The light is not pure red, it emits enough green and blue light to blow these color channels of pixels too. The hood is just ...


17

The tint slider takes care of a couple things. First off, from a color perception standpoint, there are two major axes that the cones of our eyes base color perception on: blue/yellow and magenta/green. There are some specific nuances related to these axes, however the most important is that they represent opposite colors that the human eye can not see ...


17

This is an observation made by many when they start to shoot in raw after being used to JPEG. You have to understand that what you see with a raw image is exactly what came off the sensor when you took the picture. Digital cameras provide all kinds of on board post processing such as noise reduction, sharpening, saturation and contrast settings which are ...


16

This is a difficult problem as in general those orange sodium vapour lamps give you little to work with, but there are some options Lighting varies with location, it's probably the case that the lighting in the second two examples was better (more sources, broader spectrum), so move around and compare results. By careful editing you can sometimes get a ...


15

I'm not quite sure what you're asking, but I'll try and cover all the bases. Firstly RGB values run from 0 to some arbitrary number depending on the colour depth - how many different colours your image format or editing program can store. A typical colour depth is 8bit per channel. Here the number of red, green and blue values is two to the power of 8, ...


15

Color spaces, as ysap stated, can be a confusing issue. There isn't a single correct answer to this question, and what you intend to do with the "final copies" of your images will really dictate what color spaces you use and when you convert from one to the other. While I think it is getting a bit dated, sRGB is still the "safest" color space these days. ...


15

Color film contains several layers, each sensitive to a different color of light (red, green, blue). When exposed to light and developed, these produce magenta, cyan and yellow colors in the negative. The printing process works in a similar way. This is similar to the way digital sensors work, in that there are filters to exclude all but one color of ...


15

I expect you are looking at the exported JPEG photos with some program which does not properly take the color space into account — it just assumes sRGB, the standard default. So, only your photos exported to match that expectation work. (Even if your screen is calibrated, your applications might not be so smart.) Keep in mind that Adobe RGB is a color space ...


14

I think the word you're looking for is "saturated". In any case, this looks to me like it was taken with a fairly wide-angle lens from quite close up (note the rather exaggerated perspective of the tray). The saturated colors are largely a result of fairly careful lighting, in this case from the right of the camera. Especially if you're accustomed to ...


13

The issue with these sorts of light sources isn't the color temperature, but rather the spectrum provided by the light. A camera (or your eyes) can only record colors which are reflected from the objects in the scene (not counting objects which have fluorescent properties). If the light shining on the object doesn't contain a certain color, it can't bounce ...


13

The question that you are asking is a very common one, but the answers are not as straight forward as you may think. How does a professional make the colors so bright, the contrast so well defined, the focus so perfect, etc ? Well, it isn't just one thing, ever. It isn't a single setting on the camera, or a single post processing technique or button. It is a ...



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