Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway

Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway
by Saaru Lindestokke                

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24

sRGB is the most common color-space used anywhere. AdobeRGB is a wider color-space which can represent more colors but with less precision when looking at the colors which overlap sRGB. Neither color-space really matters when shooting RAW. The embedded thumbnail or preview within a RAW file may be affected by the choice of color-space though, so keeping ...


18

I'm not quite sure what you're asking, but I'll try and cover all the bases. Firstly RGB values run from 0 to some arbitrary number depending on the colour depth - how many different colours your image format or editing program can store. A typical colour depth is 8bit per channel. Here the number of red, green and blue values is two to the power of 8, ...


17

The answer is basically the same as this one on white balance and raw. You're right, it doesn't matter at all in how the image is recorded or stored. As you note, the selected color space applies to the preview image and to the histogram. The camera also may make metering decisions intended to avoid clipping (overexposing to the full saturation point) in ...


17

sRGB is a color-space developed by HP and Microsoft in 1996. CRT monitors were common and therefore sRGB was based on the characteristics of these monitors' capabilities. A good write-up of the history and reasons can be found here. The chromaticity coordinates and available colors were chosen on what the phosphors used in CRTs could produce back then. ...


15

To start simply, the answer is "It is used for still photography!" I'll explain a little more in a bit, and its use is fairly niche at the moment. The roots of xvYCC The xvYCC encoding is, as far as I can tell, a modern enhancement to YCC encoding, or in its long form, Y'CbCr (or YCbCr, which is slightly different.) The YCC encoding is part of a family of ...


15

Color spaces, as ysap stated, can be a confusing issue. There isn't a single correct answer to this question, and what you intend to do with the "final copies" of your images will really dictate what color spaces you use and when you convert from one to the other. While I think it is getting a bit dated, sRGB is still the "safest" color space these days. ...


11

It's just the values from the sensor, which is a (mostly) linear counter. The different photosites on a Bayer sensor have different colored filters, and the value for each site represents the light which gets through that filter. The name "RAW" is meant to convey precisely that the values are simply that "uncooked" reading. In a sense, then, the RAW file is ...


10

sRGB is the default color space, which is way that RGB values translate to actual colors. In RGB, (255,0,0) means "full red", but what exact color is this going to be usually depends on the display or printer that's used for the output. As this is undesirable for professional purposes, people employ color management to ensure their idea of "red" will display ...


10

It is normally the responsibility of the viewing software to convert from the color-space of the file to that of the display. From what I understand, you want to do the conversion yourself because you use programs that simply assume sRGB as a color-space. A lossless conversion is not possible for this. On a properly calibrated system you will also make ...


10

Bit depth and color space are not the same thing, and neither are they mutually exclusive. They are different things that exist simultaneously. For a particularly simple explanation: Bit depth determines the fineness with which each distinct color is graded. Color space determines the extent within which those colors are distributed. Let's take sRGB and ...


10

Basically, life color information is like a box of chocolates crayons... Color information is stored in integers, not analog values — there are a discrete, countable number of colors that can be described at a certain bit depth. Think of the color space like a box of crayons of different colors. A color space describes the types of crayons that are ...


9

If everything is working correctly, the difference should be subtle and you shouldn't generally notice a big shift. I have a suspicion: You may be working on a monitor which is not capable of rendering the whole Adobe RGB gamut. In this case, out-of-gamut colors are clipped or approximated (perhaps poorly). When you convert to sRGB, the colors are mapped ...


9

Normally you would use sRGB mode. It is the most common denominator. Keep in mind that this mode is not calibrated, so your sRGB colors will be different from other sRGB colors. They should be closer. Once in sRGB mode your monitor may not be able to show colors which are outside of sRGB color-space which is why sRGB is not the default mode. The truly odd ...


7

Color spaces solve two problems related to color information: imaging sensors can capture a lot more data than can be displayed by any media or device - the data is therefore useless when transferring and storing images; color space defines the range of data that is preserved color space standardizes what each color should look like, so the ...


7

xvYCC is a particular clever way of encoding color data: it abuses the YCC representation by using previously-forbidden combinations of values to represent colors outside the gamut of the RGB space used in the YCC scheme. That is, some YCC tuples decode to colors with negative R G or B values. Previously these were simply illegal; in xvYCC these are ...


7

A color model is the mathematical (or computer science) way of describing colors. It is independent from physical devices. RGB-8 or RGB-16 are color models as well as CYMK or HSL. A color space is the method of mapping real colors to the color model's discrete values. sRGB and AdobRGB are color spaces that both use RGB as model. But in one the color ...


7

The CIE 1931 chromaticity diagram represents all colors that the average human eye can see. But just because those colors can be perceived by the average human eye, does not mean that all technologies can produce all the possible colors that the average eye can possibly see. While no tristimulus model can create the entire gamut of human color perception, ...


6

Photopic luminous efficiency is more simply stated as the spectral response function, normally of the human eye (though in photography it could also refer to spectral response of film, sensor, etc.) There are several -- in fact, if you want to get down to it, there really millions -- every person's spectral response is probably (minutely) different from ...


6

Yes and no. It is important to remember that RGB is an additive process, and CYMK is a subtractive process. First, the yes; there are general mappings that can be done -- so the absence of green light means that you want to print magenta (which will reflect the red and blue portions). On a slightly more detailed level, you get the "no"; There is more than ...


6

A color model is a method of describing a color. For example with Red, Green and Blue (RGB) elements or with Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black (CMYK). A color space is the set of colors which can be displayed or reproduced in a medium (whether stored, printed or displayed). For example, sRGB is a particular set of intensities for red, green and blue and ...


6

Because, as you say, L*a*b* is a superset larger than either sRGB or Adobe RGB, you're right, this is safe — if you have enough bit depth to prevent color mapping errors. In practice, this means that if you are working in 16 bits per channel, there is no loss. If you are working in 8 bits per channel, there may be some, as you are spreading your "crayons" ...


6

Lab is one of those colour spaces that people are either 'in the know' and use when it's appropriate or they just see as a bit of a scary place to be avoided. It's not a one-size fits all space and it takes some getting used to. The main reason to use Lab in a professional setting is that, once you get a handle on it, having Luminosity and Colour kept ...


6

why is its color space limited to so small a portion of the actual complete color space? Because the "red", "green" and "blue" which your monitor uses are pale, probably not noticeable but still pale. You would probably not be surprised if your monitor used distinguishably pale colours and was said to have small colour space. No matter how pale the ...


5

I'd say that it depends on your output medium, or more correctly, the relationship between the object, the storage format and the output medium. The problem is that when working with an extended space, then at the last stage of actually printing or displaying your image, where the medium is more limited than the source, some kind of remapping needs to take ...


5

1) I have never seen any official information, but various people close to the LR development team indicated at numerous occasions that LR is internally using color space that they named Melissa, which has gamut of ProPhoto RGB, but different gamma. 2) No devices support entire ProPhoto RGB, but many, especially modern inkjet printers, exceed sRGB and even ...


5

As someone who regularly works in other spaces (most frequently Lab) I'd say not to worry about it. Since your rationale for going to another space is to make changes you're expecting that your RGB output will not be identical to your RGB input. Any noise should be well within acceptable boundaries. HSV is by no means perfect and it could theoretically be ...


5

What I'm wondering is, why do my pictures not look the same across the board?! I'm sure I will have an experience that one time I upload a picture to Facebook or somewhere online and the picture not coming looking good. It is not possible to tell from a screenshot what Facebook did to your picture, but I would not be surprised if it converted it ...


4

Good explanations of additive versus subtractive color so far, I just wanted to clarify a few points... First, there isn't a single RGB or CMYK standard, both are device dependent (the colors vary based on what device is displaying/printing them), so already we have trouble. A typical CMYK color space (a graph of all the possible colors of a given color ...


4

You have things almost completely backwards. This is not a case where still photography could/should "catch up" with video -- quite the contrary, this is a matter of video having finally caught up to (roughly) the capabilities that TIFF (for one example) provide a couple decades ago (or so). While you certainly didn't see very many 16 bits/channel TIFFs 20 ...



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