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18

The reason is that the red light is a light source, therefore it's much brighter than any other parts of the scene. The pixels showing it are overblown - meaning there was more light coming than your camera sensor could capture. The light is not pure red, it emits enough green and blue light to blow these color channels of pixels too. The hood is just ...


14

It is difficult to answer the question accurately without knowing what you really photographed. But what you have reported is very similar to what many photographers experience when photographing red flowers. This has a two fold cause. First the CMOS sensor in the camera has an extended spectral response extending into the near infrared. See the diagram ...


14

What you're seeing in that shot is overexposure. Unlike overexposure in a day time shot,where the blown highlights tend to go pure white, the red light from the sign caused overexposure in the just the red channel. Thus all the different tones of red have become 100% red and detail is lost. It can be fixed by reshooting at a faster speed / smaller aperture ...


11

As Guffa said, the red channel is blown. All the RGB values are (255,0,0) In the other red parts of the image, it's more like (190, 35, 40) and all the red, green and blue luminance values fluctuate and there is some texture/detail/noise. Histogram of the blown area: And of the nearby red area:


10

This is simply a problem of dynamic range. When the overall scene is evenly exposed (in this case, slightly underexposed), the light itself is too bright for the range of your sensor. Assuming that you want both the light and the dial to be apparent in the scene (an assumption I make because you say you want to see it as you see through your eyes), you can ...


9

If you make the surrounding brighter, you can decrease the scene's dynamic range. Try casting some light from a white light source on the device and make your exposure shorter.


9

When shooting red flowers I usually have to tell the camera to underexpose from what it thinks is the correct exposure. I don't know if the D5000 has separate histograms for red, green, and blue. If it does then you can use the red histogram to make sure you're not blowing out the red highlights. Otherwise you'll have to check the picture and on the camera ...


7

Camera Shake and Overexposure As well as overexposure, I believe there is some camera shake (look at the lighted windows to the left), which will tend to turn anything into a blob. Camera Shake I'm guessing that in order to try and get enough light in for this mostly-dark scene, your camera slowed the shutter right down. When the shutter is slowed down, ...


6

So the other posts are correct in that the red channel is being blown, but what you really want to know is how to overcome the issue within the camera without post editing. The Nikon D5000 has the Picture Control System giving users the ability to customize image capture preferences. Six settings are available — Standard, Neutral, Vivid, Monochrome, ...


5

You hit the nail on the head with the bit about watching for strong reds and dialing down the exposure. For some reason, it seems like everything blows red if there is a strong red, from the low to the high end and regardless of manufacturer. You just have to watch for it and be careful. I'm not aware of any other kind of fix.


5

When your camera adjusts your settings (aperture, shutter speed, and/or ISO) to get a certain exposure value it is basing those decisions on the tone of the image (different from color). It could be any color, but the tone should average out to be 18% grey (thus the use of grey cards that are 18% grey). So if you had a bright white vs a dark white you ...


5

Although the CCDs in DSLRs are quite sensitive to the deep red colors (including H-alpha), the camera manufacturers added a filter over that part of the spectrum to make the photos they take appear more like the images we see with our eyes (that aren't so sensitive to those wavelengths). However, in astrophotography, H-alpha is important. Often, big gas ...


4

Yes, the red light is totally blown out, and that is simply the whole issue. It looks to be more in focus, because you are seeing the point where it gets clipped as an edge. The blown area looks flat, and the edge around that area looks like it is almost in focus. We are used to seeing areas where all color components are blown out to white, not so often ...


4

Possibly the area was painted with fluorescent red paint, also known by the brand name Day-Glo. Standard red paint just reflects the red component of incident light. Fluorescent red paint in addition converts high frequencies (UV) to red, thereby boosting brightness. High brightness can cause overexposure, in this case in the red channel. To avoid that, ...


3

The reason the red light appears white in the picture is that it is significantly overexposed. Even the small amounts of blue and green in the red light are enough to saturate your sensor in red and green, and almost saturate it in blue. Thus it appears almost white. Look at it this way, if your camera reaches saturation at a value of 255 and there is enough ...


3

You need to lower your exposure. The red is brighter than the camera can pick up. If it is bright enough, you may have to use an HDR technique and take one really dark photo for the red of the light and another for everything else.


3

I suspect what happened is that you used the flash, which is meant to approximate the color temperature of sunlight, but had the camera set to indoor, incandescent lighting white balance. (Or, possibly, auto white balance that just went wrong.) There are many ways to adjust this in Photoshop and in other editing tools. The Levels tool is probably the ...


3

There are a couple of things you can do to help mitigate problems with blowing the red colour channel: Shoot with a cyan filter. This will effectively under expose just the red channel. This can be useful if for example you're shooting in low light and your scene contains data in the blue channel, which would otherwise become noisy. However this approach ...


3

There are mainly two factors that can cause this: The red channel may be over exposed, so the red colours are simply blown out and all detail is clipped. Red colors have fewer distinguishable nuances. We can see a lot of differnt blue nuances, a bit fewer green, and quite few red. You simply can't expect to see as many details in a red flower as in a blue ...


2

Most probably you are experiencing overexposure in red color channel. You can check this from a histogram that displays color channels separately - the red channel has a peak at the right end. Many cameras base their exposure metering on green channel, because human vision is most sensitive to green. Unfortunately, possibility of restoring information in an ...


2

I'm not sure what causes the problem but I suspect it's a WB issue and/or reflection from your light source (both daylight and flash are quite blue) Also, when you photograph something that is basically the same color your camera auto WB will tend to be wrong (actually, I've used a picture that is very similar to your rose picture to intentionally make my ...


2

Color does figure into it on some cameras. Nikon SLRs use a small CCD with red, green and blue filters mounted in the pentaprism housing to do exposure metering, auto white balance and a few other things. This article discusses how metering works on the F5 film body, and almost all of what's there forms the basis for the metering in Nikon's digital bodies. ...


1

Your seeing visual clipping. The way that the camera exposed the image, the Red channel was brighter than the camera could capture there. You've probably seen this kind of thing far more commonly with generally blown out spots where you get white highlights that all details is lost within. In this case, it just happened that it only blew out on the red ...


1

Have you been closing the application after printing? I'm not sure exactly what causes it, but when I was doing prints out of Lightroom the other day on my Pro-1 and I closed lightroom. The exact moment I closed the program, the print (mid-line) developed the problem you describe. Reprinting and not closing the program fixed the issue completely. My ...


1

This is a question where a sample image would help us determine the causes of your results. For results others are getting with the same model, a Flickr search should give plenty of samples. Without seeing any of your images, the usual suspects are wrong white balance saturation setting too high the monitor used to assess the results needs calibration


1

If the subject is truly taking up the entire shot, then I would suspect the white balance meter doesn't have enough range of colors to pick from to correctly determine what "white" is. This will throw your colors off. That can be fixed by using a grey card before shooting a series. Alternatively, you can shoot in RAW, and fix the white balance in post ...


1

Some cameras allow you to see the histogram for each color channel side by side. That way you can tell if a single color was overexposed instead of the entire image.



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