Before the rush

Before the rush
by evan-pak

Submit your Photo
Hall of Fame

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

New answers tagged

0

You need to use X-Rite's i1Profiler software. Unlike the ColorChecker Passport software, it can create ICC profiles from the ColorChecker that Phase One can use. It looks like it only comes bundled with one of the X-Rite i1 products. See: http://www.colourspace.xyz/creating-camera-profiles-for-capture-one/


-1

Since it's supported in Lightroom, couldn't you do the magic correcting in Lightroom which would get the colors looking like they should on the screen. Then use that exported image and bring it into Capture One to guide your correcting in Capture One?


1

As the graph presented in this article shows, using AdobeRGB might allow you better make use of some greens which are inside the gamut of the print but outside the gamut of sRGB. Of course, the monitor should have a large enough gamut to allow you to actually see the difference. I use might as not all paper/ink combinations deliver the same gamut. That is ...


1

The workflow: You develop your image from raw into large gamut color space (even larger than AdobeRGB) and this is your source. The photo editor then handles automatically and behind the scenes conversions for your display or your printer. Or you can export sRGB for web. I just read an article by a photographer who explained that he always works in ...


1

First, as to whether you'll want to shoot an IT8 target as often as you would a white balance target, the answer is "probably not". Getting a good IT8 shot involves significantly more consideration than shooting a gray card, and once you have a good profile made with a good full-spectrum light source, it will be perfectly usable for photos taken under most ...


1

What is the correct setting for this field? Does it need to be adjusted from one camera to another? There is no correct or incorrect setting. Adobe created several profiles for each camera with focus on different qualities. Select profile that gives the most acceptable colors for you. On my Nikon D750, the color profile is set to 'sRGB'. Should I ...



Top 50 recent answers are included