Serene Life

by garik

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

31

There are probably a few things you should look for. Color range is probably the most important factor, and a monitor that is at least capable of representing the Adobe RGB Wide Gamut color space (or color gamut) is important. Most professional cameras will generate images in the Adobe RGB space, while many printers, such as Epson's Stylus Pro line, support ...


25

Check out this image by Jeff Schewe from wikipedia. It's a 2D slice of what's really a three-dimensional space, but it makes the basic concept clear: So: sRGB is a subset of AdobeRGB, which is a subset of ProPhoto RGB. You can also see how ProPhoto RGB extends outside of the curved shape which represents visible colors. And you can see how AdobeRGB is a ...


22

Color Management is a scientific process by which various devices used in an image processing workflow can be used despite differences in their supported color. Every device is only approximating some of the total range of colors humans can see, and this limited range is called its "color gamut". Each device has limitations, but those limitations differ from ...


19

When discussing the number of colors perceptible to the human eye, I tend to refer to the 2.4 million colors of the CIE 1931 XYZ color space. It is a fairly solid, scientifically founded number, although I do admit it may be limited in context. I think it may be possible for the human eye to be sensitive to 10-100 million distinct "colors" when referring to ...


17

This can be a complex answer, and quite often, the outcome is that it depends what you print on, meaning you might need to change it or recalibrate often. On White Point White point from the perspective of the human eye is a very subjective thing, as the eye automatically "recalibrates" itself to differing white points depending on the kind of light that ...


17

ColorHug is the Best Answer Linux developer Richard Hughes has designed and sells an open source colorimeter called the ColorHug. If you are running Linux, and don't have other hardware available already, this is simple, cheap, and fast. (In fact, it's about 50× faster than the old GretagMacbeth I was using before.) The current price is £60 plus shipping ...


16

Ideally, you're shooting in an environment with controlled lighting (a single light source, or several tuned to same color temperature), your subject and black or white surfaces only. In this case, the angle does not matter - just take care that its exposure falls somewhere in the middle in your test shot (so you're not accidentally clipping a channel). In ...


15

I expect you are looking at the exported JPEG photos with some program which does not properly take the color space into account — it just assumes sRGB, the standard default. So, only your photos exported to match that expectation work. (Even if your screen is calibrated, your applications might not be so smart.) Keep in mind that Adobe RGB is a color space ...


15

Since you can't do anything about the color management of other people's monitors, the best you can do is: Make sure your own system is properly color managed (see other questions here on color management). That way, you are at least certain that you're starting from a known point. This is really worth doing even though it takes some effort and probably a ...


14

Here is the one we suggest using at SmugMug, the full sized image is available for anybody to use. http://cmac.smugmug.com/SmugMug/Test-prints/Calibration-prints/122238_UAxBs#5637776_3P7qj-A-LB


14

To start simply, the answer is "It is used for still photography!" I'll explain a little more in a bit, and its use is fairly niche at the moment. The roots of xvYCC The xvYCC encoding is, as far as I can tell, a modern enhancement to YCC encoding, or in its long form, Y'CbCr (or YCbCr, which is slightly different.) The YCC encoding is part of a family of ...


14

Color laser printers, especially the big high end office printers, have the color capabilities you need for printing the company logo and the occasional Excel pie chart — but they are truly bad for printing photos. But the good news is that almost any of the current generation of ink jet printers, even the cheap ones, are pretty good at printing photos - ...


14

OK... I used to run a print shop so i think i qualify to answer this. Any print shop that can print 36x20 inhouse will be using a large format inkjet printer, id say Epson, HP or Canon. Assuming the printer is reasonably new (IE < 4 years) it will almost definitely use good inks - in Epson's case UltraChrome. IF the print shop uses a constant feed ink ...


12

I have one. You're right — it's a good value for the money, and there's basically no catch except that if you're running under Mac or Windows you'll need to know a little more about what you're doing than you might if you just bought one of the big-name devices. That's because there's only software for Linux. If you are using Linux (any modern ...


11

There are a three types of flat-panel monitors (IPS, VA, and TN) and IPS will give you the best results for photography. It's often difficult to figure out the exact type of panel a given monitor uses; here's a list. Install it somewhere you can provide consistent lighting, and calibrate it with a hardware colorimeter.


11

The lab photo printers are likely to be dye-sublimation, or silver-halide (where the digital image is projected onto normal photo paper) which unlike lithography don't require halftoning, however they still use ink and thus follow the subtractive colour model, so the principal is the same. The reason your colours were off is probably due to CMYK conversion ...


11

The short answer is that yes, essentially all monitors need calibrating if you're going to do photoediting. Apple makes some decent monitors, but they're not particularly different from others, nor (specifically) any less in need of calibration than others. Keep in mind, however, that calibration isn't magic -- it won't suddenly make a really cheap monitor ...


11

Inherently, no. The RGB model is natural for recording light, and the CMYK model is natural for printing (where reflected light is subtracted). But see Are RGB numeric values equal to CMYK percentages? — the loss in conversation isn't inherently because RGB to CMYK is inherently lossy, but because the actual color spaces of the devices used are different, ...


10

I've had exactly the same issue and it is possible to arrive at a correct and workable solution. There are a lot of misconceptions both in the question and the previous answers (and indeed, around colour management in general), so let me try to clear them up and provide you with an answer. First, the misconceptions... Regular (non-wide) monitors do not ...


10

Printing a picture seems like it should be easy but there is a lot more involved when it comes to getting predictable colors from what you see on the screen to the print. The first step is calibrating your monitor. This ensures that your monitor is displaying colors correctly. You can purchase a calibrator from companies such as Colorvision (Spyder series) ...


10

These cameras have microadjustment capability, just not in a user-accessible way. The exact method varies by model. Some have a software feature in an advanced (and secret) "debug" menu — the Pentax K10D, for example, had this. Others have physical adjustment screws or similar (like earlier Canon Rebel models). Or, repair centers may simply use shims. To ...


10

The color correction is acting as expected. The point of using a color target is to adjust for the color of light to assume that the light is white. If you want to have the color that is present when shooting, you should instead use a fixed white point that you consider to be standard white, but naturally people's eyes will adjust quite a bit for the color ...


9

It looks like the ZR30W uses a fluorescent backlight. Although it's a cold-cathode fluorescent, the color still changes a little with the temperature. You want to be sure you let the display warm up for quite a while before profiling it to be sure the temperature is stable. The usual recommendation is something like 20 minutes as a minimum, but from what ...


8

Probably not the answer you want, but if you have a bad monitor, and a bad printer, you're probably going to get bad prints. A color calibration system (hardware) would help, but that's an investment of money and if you aren't willing to do that for your monitor/printer I'm guessing you aren't willing to spend the money on a calibrator. If you don't make a ...


8

The biggest is color management by far. I use the term "photolab" instead of "online printing company." Ensure your files have the correct color space attached. Many pro labs support a variety of color spaces, so you should use the one that they recommend. Have your monitor color calibrated using a hardware colorimeter. Eye balling it, will not give you ...


8

The obvious problem (or an obvious problem, anyway) is that relatively few cameras have (even very close to) the degree of accuracy and repeatability of exposures to make it work at all well. Back when magazine review budgets allowed it, some of them included graphs of camera shutter speed accuracy. Especially in faster shutter speeds, it was pretty routine ...


8

Some monitors need more calibration than others and their color-gamut limits how close they can actually get to showing accurate colors. For example, if a monitor can only has 80% coverage of sRGB, then even after the best calibration it will at most show 80% of colors right. Good monitors now cover 100% (at least 98%) of sRGB and a good percentage (92%+) ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible