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14

What you're seeing is longitudinal chromatic aberration (otherwise known as axial colour), whereby the light at the edge of the bokeh disc undergoes a colour shift depending on whether it is in front of or behind plane of focus. The reason for this is that light of different wavelengths focus at different distances along the axis of the lens. This is very ...


5

The purple tinge to the lights in your photograph has been caused by longitudinal chromatic aberration, which results when using a wide aperture, meaning the blue and red components of the spectrum are not focused as sharply as the rest. It can also manifest as a green tinge, or even both where there are specular highlights either side of the plane of focus. ...


5

There are three main types of colour fringing: Lateral chromatic aberration. This is the result of the lens focal length differing depending on the wavelength of incoming light. It is seen mainly in the corners and can be readily corrected, either by the camera (in JPEG mode) or by the RAW conversion software. Better lenses show less lateral CA but in the ...


4

This is called Chromatic Aberration (CA). In photography its is also known as Purple Fringing. It occurs because lenses have a different refractive index for different wavelengths of light. The refractive index decreases with increasing wavelength. Its most visible when you shoot a dark object against a bright background. To overcome this problem totally, ...


4

I just started noticing this issue on my 1.4 lens as well. I've been using this guy's method to fix it, since Camera Raw doesn't do much on this type of aberration: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XOIz8irPuGo Basically it involves making a copy of your background layer, blurring the heck out of it, switching it to a Color layer, applying a layer mask to ...


2

Some fringing is a result of overexposure. What happens is that the light shining on the sensor builds up a charge, and the charge sort of leaks to neighboring sensor elements. This produces a fringing around bright objects, for example, a picture of an egret standing in front of a dark background. The solution in this case is to lower the exposure. Some ...


2

RawTherapee can do this (and can handle not only raw files, despite the name). I don't know if it can integrate into Bibble but I doubt it. See here for the manual. There are three possible ways, one in the "raw" tab, one in "change/manipulate/transform" tab (fourth tab, I don't know the English name), and one in the "detail" tab (second tab). The last one ...


1

Purple fringe most commonly happens with fast lenses used wide open shooting directly into a source of light. They generally show up around areas with blown highlights, so the two easiest things you can do to reduce fringing are to a) stop the lens down to a smaller aperture, and b) avoid blowing any highlights. Purple fringe is also known as longitudinal ...


1

The tool you are looking for in any of the applications you might use is called Chromatic Aberration Correction and is usually one of several options in a Lens Correction section/tab of the program. Do any of the applications you are using include a Lens Correction module? You might also find the answers to other questions tagged with chromatic aberration ...


1

Fast primes, even expensive ones, will show CA at wider apertures under certain conditions. The best way to deal with it without giving up the wide aperture is in processing, either by the camera's jpeg engine or in post. To use the lens profile from Canon you can use Digital Photo Professional to convert the RAW files after adding the profiles for your ...


1

Color fringing (chromatic aberration) is caused by the fact that different wavelengths of light do not refract (and therefore do not focus) the same. More expensive lenses with lens coatings and achromatic elements can reduce CA. Cheaper lenses, particularly zoom lenses, tend to display more fringing. With a given lens, you can reduce fringing by using ...


1

The purple/red/green thingo on fast primes that appears in any part of the image occurs only on bits that are out of focus. This happens cos the colours don't all reach the sensor at the same focus, so some colours are front focussed and some backfocusses. It seems to be more noticeable on bright borders. You may either postprocess them away, or stop the ...



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