Antarctica

Antarctica
by ʇolɐǝz ǝɥʇ qoq

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3

Re: your other question about what could still cause variations in color. (@Cody Hint: just because one relatively new low rep member has a negative comment on a question is no reason to immediately delete it.) The biggest issue is most likely the fluorescent lighting. There are two major considerations with most types of fluorescent lights in the context ...


0

There are warming and cooling filters that can be mounted atop the lens. The warming series is 81A – 81B – 81C – 81D. These are pale salmon, 81D being the strongest. All require you to increase exposure 1/3 stop. Alternately, you can warm up the flash with gel filters. Gels are likely your best bet as they are available from theatrical supply houses as they ...


3

Put a gel filter over your flash. Golden or orange (especially the CTO) will be best. These filters are available from various manufacturers and holders are also available,if you desire one. There is a product from Rosco that includes variety of pre-cut filters for this purpose that includes various effect colors, but also balancing ones. It is called The ...


3

During the photo shoot, you need to take an exposure of a color calibration card (ColorChecker) and use it to create a camera color profile in your computer. X-Rite is a leading company in this field. Check out this video for the process: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dn5VvB32wVI Preferably, create one profile for each photo shoot, and not only a general ...


0

It is neither a lens nor a technique problem. There are instances where trying to capture true renditions of naturally occurring hues is not possible. The morning glory bloom is one specific example. Violet is one hue with wavelengths that cannot be artificially reproduced at the present. Your subject pictured above appears to be in that category. The ...


6

Despite you saying that this does not happen with 55-250mm objective I claim that this is the problem with camera settings. If you finally upload the photograph made with 500D and 55-250mm I may update the answer. Cameras do not generally make neutral images because it is impossible to crop bucks selling cameras which do not produce the image which make ...


1

This is not a problem with the lens There are several possible reasons why this can happen, some trickier than others. But most likely problem is the color balance. You probably used automatic color balance settings on your camera and since there are only limited colors in the picture, the scene was not evaluated correctly. You should be able to fix that in ...


6

The flower is supposed to be dark violet, but it's come out light blue. That indicates the image is overexposed. If the flower is dark, the image of the flower should be a similar tone. So for a start you need to lower the exposure and darken the flower. The reason for the color change from violet to blue is that the reds in the image are blown (or ...


0

You need to use X-Rite's i1Profiler software. Unlike the ColorChecker Passport software, it can create ICC profiles from the ColorChecker that Phase One can use. It looks like it only comes bundled with one of the X-Rite i1 products. See: http://www.colourspace.xyz/creating-camera-profiles-for-capture-one/


-1

Since it's supported in Lightroom, couldn't you do the magic correcting in Lightroom which would get the colors looking like they should on the screen. Then use that exported image and bring it into Capture One to guide your correcting in Capture One?


1

First, as to whether you'll want to shoot an IT8 target as often as you would a white balance target, the answer is "probably not". Getting a good IT8 shot involves significantly more consideration than shooting a gray card, and once you have a good profile made with a good full-spectrum light source, it will be perfectly usable for photos taken under most ...


4

Sadly, there's not much useful color information in the pictures to work with. This is probably not remotely the answer you were hoping for, but... Being a fan of the old tinted postcard look, if these were my pictures I would probably try to emulate that, as an alternative to going full monochrome. How to do this will depend on your choice of software, but ...



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