India Point Park

India Point Park
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22

Color Management is a scientific process by which various devices used in an image processing workflow can be used despite differences in their supported color. Every device is only approximating some of the total range of colors humans can see, and this limited range is called its "color gamut". Each device has limitations, but those limitations differ from ...


19

That comes down to color temperature of the ambient light. Flash always has something similar to daylight (5500-6500K), so you need to use conversion gels from daylight. Most useful gel is CTO (color temperature orange), which will color daylight to tungsten (3200K). Usage is as follows:Stick CTO gel on flashSet color temperature to tungstenShoot This has ...


18

The reason is that the red light is a light source, therefore it's much brighter than any other parts of the scene. The pixels showing it are overblown - meaning there was more light coming than your camera sensor could capture. The light is not pure red, it emits enough green and blue light to blow these color channels of pixels too. The hood is just ...


15

I cannot give an exhaustive answer for everything you could improve, but I think you have a problem I am frequently noticing in my own images: oversaturation. This is especially well visible in the third image - in my experience, dead reed does not have such a rich golden hue, especially on a cloudy winter day. Oversaturation happens frequently, because a) ...


15

My solution is to set a timer and stop editing when it goes off. I won't edit any single shot for more than 15 minutes and try not to edit for more than an hour. Go for a walk, look out a window, see some reality (not just browse the web) -- even 5 minutes is generally enough to restore my reality and save me from the terrible progression of excessive edits. ...


14

Gray cards are super cheap (e.g., $2.49) - I wouldn't bother. :)


13

Don't use auto white balance - choose a color temperature that looks well and stick to it (or use a gray card if the color accuracy is important) Close all the windows - the daylight color changes based on weather, if possible use only flashes and photographic color balanced lights, if you must use normal indoor lights try not to change light bulbs, if you ...


13

From my point of view - or how I use my gels - there are two main usage points: Adjusting a color to get a color effect. For example make your flash-light red/green/... to get a interesting background color spot. Adjusting flash color to the color of ambient light, so that your picture have only one color of light. If you have different light-colors in one ...


12

The color correction is acting as expected. The point of using a color target is to adjust for the color of light to assume that the light is white. If you want to have the color that is present when shooting, you should instead use a fixed white point that you consider to be standard white, but naturally people's eyes will adjust quite a bit for the color ...


11

Some post processing is needed for some images, and most images benefit from some post processing. When you take an image like this, where most of it is blue, the automatic white balance will be fooled into thinking that the image should be much less blue. If you had used the "daylight" setting for white balance, it would have been a lot closer to the ...


11

Yes, their main purpose is to have different colors on different lights. However in the vast majority of cases (if not always) you simply cannot reproduce this setup in post. The human eye is quite good at detecting natural light falloff and it will detect the things which are Photoshopped, especially if we talk about a setup with multiple lights (we ...


11

The gear actually isn't as important in your situation as the workflow to preserve color accuracy. The main issues you'll need to consider are: Accurate white balancing when shooting. This typically involves shooting in RAW format (so you need a camera that shoots in RAW) with some type of color reference in the frame--something like a WhiBal or ...


10

I'm surprised no one has suggested the most important thing you can do to improve that picture: Take the photo when the light is better. Let's say that row of houses faces east. There's going to be a window of time in the morning where the low angle of the sun is going to cast a nice warm light on that facade while at the same time the sky behind it is ...


9

The interesting thing here is that's not a colour cast, the hue values are messed up. It's not just that all the colours have been pushed toward purple, which can happen for certain white balance settings, what's actually happened is that all colours are shifted round the colour wheel, blue/cyan -> purple, orange/brown -> green. Here's the right hand part ...


8

Spot-meter the palm of your hand (be sure it's lit appropriately, however). Seriously. It, or a Caucasian face, will meter about 1 stop brighter than you need, which means it's easy to compensate for.


8

I would think that a lab's color-correcting quality is dependent upon the lab and the skill of the technicians. There probably is not a single, globally correct answer here, as every lab will use different equipment and have different people with different levels of skill. That said, when it comes to color correction for print, taking the paper into account ...


8

The trick here is that the scene was lit with a single incandescent (hot) lightsource. The sun is also an incandescent lightsource, just shifted a bit in the spectrum. This means it's really easy to make the bonfire shot look like daylight, as all the frequencies are present, just shifted. All I did was load the RAW into Adobe's RAW converter and drop the ...


8

The third is a result of the first two. You have to set a ratio for each color in relation to another. If you turn up both the blue and the green, this effectively reduces the red. Similarly, if you go all the way towards yellow and magenta, then you increase the red. Put another way, green/magenta is the balance between green vs red and blue and ...


7

Shouldn't it be possible to attach some kind of gel holder directly to the flash unit, and then softbox on top of that?


7

The amount of processing is always a matter of personal taste, you can see some people to prefer almost straight-from-the-camera images, while others apply significant contrast changes to achieve their typical look. So the matter of post-processing is always a matter of your personal taste (and of course how much do you want to go with what people around ...


7

IT is enough to add a cooling filter (25% Cooling Filter (80) in Photoshop) to the image and increase a little the contrast and saturation (10% or so). Do not overdo it or the result will be unrealistic. You could use a polarizing filter for a darker sky. always shoot in raw to be able to change the white balance later. If unsure of the details you whant to ...


7

I'm surprised nobody mentioned a polarizing filter. That can do wonders on a blue sky, depending on the angle from the sun. Think about what sky light actually is. It's light from the sun getting scattered from small particles in the atmosphere. Those are going to be largely dielectric, so will be polarized over a range of angles. The light from any one ...


7

As far as i know, many Photographers just shoot in Auto WB in such a case. But if you can get the WB correct at the time of shooting you can skip this step in post or you only have to do minor ajustments instead of figuring it out completely.


7

You would convert the image to the sRGB color profile. This profile is indended to match the color capabilities of a monitor. This is commonly used for images that are used in web pages, and for example offered as an option when exporting images for web in Photoshop. By converting the image to sRGB the color profile can be omitted from the file, which ...


7

The first step is to observe. The main diference is a slight color on the first image. Method 1 Technicly that is a duotone, it is the easiest way to work it anyway. 1) In Photoshop, convert the image to grayscale Image > Mode > Grayscale 2) Convert it to duotone Image > Mode > Duotone 3) Choose Duotone on the dialog box, not tritone, or monotone. 4) ...


6

If you're using photoshop, select all of them in Adobe Raw Converter and then select your white balance by either adjusting the sliders or using the color balance eye dropper tool. I'm assuming the use of photoshop since your question is tagged with photoshop.


6

The answer is: sRGB = (255, 241, 234). The details of the calculation: I calculated the spectrum of a blackbody at 5800 K using the Planck’s formula, then multiplied by the CIE color-matching functions of the standard 2 degrees observer and integrated over the wavelengths to get the (X, Y, Z) color. I then divided by X+Y+Z to get the chromaticity: (x, y) ...


6

Yes, the camera has "presets" that are applied to the image to give it some more contrast, saturation, etc. It's very common for people to want to switch back to JPEG because RAW images look flat when you start out. It's important to still use RAW though, because you can add in your artistic vision a lot more effectively with more sensor data. To answer ...



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