The Sleeping Giant's Sea Lion

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15

I'm not quite sure what you're asking, but I'll try and cover all the bases. Firstly RGB values run from 0 to some arbitrary number depending on the colour depth - how many different colours your image format or editing program can store. A typical colour depth is 8bit per channel. Here the number of red, green and blue values is two to the power of 8, ...


8

Lab employee here. I can't speak for all labs but here's how it works at mine (note that we do both photographic and press printing as well as a few other methods). It all depends on the type of equipment that is going to be printing your product. Traditionally photographic prints are done on a minilab or equivalent piece of equipment which prints in RGB. ...


8

The guide I've always used is below. It differs by ethnicity, but is a good starting point. You can't use a dropper tool directly on skin because it's obviously not grey. Not if your subject is healthy How to get pleasing skin tone Highlights of the article: % of yellow should at least equal the % of magenta. Light skinned subjecst should have between ...


6

Yes and no. It is important to remember that RGB is an additive process, and CYMK is a subtractive process. First, the yes; there are general mappings that can be done -- so the absence of green light means that you want to print magenta (which will reflect the red and blue portions). On a slightly more detailed level, you get the "no"; There is more than ...


4

Short answer: If you don't mind which colors the CMYK channel values represent, simply apply any random CMYK profile you can find and call it a day. Long answer: there is no really color space called "CMYK" with the meaning that ANY value combination for channels C, M, Y and K results in any specific color. Sure, a high value for Y and zero for the other ...


4

First of all, sRGB is a single color space, with defined boundaries and defined mappings from RGB values to (for example) CIE XYZ values, a specified viewing environment, etc. CYMK, by contrast, is really a whole family of color spaces. All the color spaces in the family are subtractive, but you can't count on them having a lot in common beyond that. The ...


4

I haven't done the math, but I believe there is a lossless RGB to CMYK transform, just as there is from RGB to Lab or RGB to HSL and back. I believe you just want to ignore the black channel, and reflect the R, G, and B channels across the color cube. The thing is, in what way would that be useful? No one makes CMYK images with the intent of showing them on ...


4

It depends on the lab. Some processes are designed for CMYK others for RGB. Most labs can also adapt the format, though if you want the finest grain control, you should proof in whatever color space they will use. This is also why they ask for them in the correct format. They don't want to have to deal with unhappy customers as a result of the change in ...


4

CMYK CMYK is a subtractive colour model rather than an additive as in the case of sRGB. The subtractive colour models are used in printing since they allow dyes, ink or paint pigments to absorb certain wavelengths from an otherwise white surface. The dyes, ink and paint pigments can be a very limited discrete set that are mixed to get a wide range of ...


3

CMYK is based off of offset printing capabilities where you are using only specific shades of Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black ink being laid down from separate printing plates to print full color. It isn't mechanically capable of reproducing very saturated colors. But ... most photo inkjets don't expect you to send generic CMYK files to them. They have ...


3

The covered range of colors (called gamut) is different between color spaces because these ranges are then discretized, "digitized", represented on a fixed amount of bits, and then reproduced on a monitor, in print, etc. One wants to store as much color information as possible in a certain amount of bytes. Now, if you have an equipment which can only emit ...


3

Good explanations of additive versus subtractive color so far, I just wanted to clarify a few points... First, there isn't a single RGB or CMYK standard, both are device dependent (the colors vary based on what device is displaying/printing them), so already we have trouble. A typical CMYK color space (a graph of all the possible colors of a given color ...


2

When talking "CMYK", your talking a completely different language than RGB, the range of gamuts there tends to be rather diverse and device dependent. I would say its less about "lossless" conversion, and more about properly converting an RGB image to the right mix of CMYK inks for each pixel. There WILL be loss, but when a final print is viewed, the ...


2

The CMYK colour space is based on a subtractive colour model, where combining colours results in a darker shade. This is the way that inks work, by absorbing incoming light - theoretically mixing cyan magenta and yellow together will result in black (K stands for keyline and is a black ink that is used because mixtures of CMY tend to produce slightly off ...


2

It is about accountability. Typically print jobs have company branding involved. Printers don't want clients returning large print batches because "The blue is not the same". There is less room for error (no conversion on their end) if you supply them the document in the same format they are printing it in. Slight color variations are also harder to spot in ...


1

Exact blue is exact blue in all color spaces. If you have a specific color in one color space and convert it to a different color space, it's still exactly the same color (provided that the color is actually possible to represent in the new color space). The color code will be different, but it still represents the same color. If you create a very bright ...


1

Ease of print color mixing. When you are using ink based printing, any application of ink darkens a white page, thus making it difficult to get a true sRGB color space in prints without many inks. If you use a dark blue ink, you can't easily produce light shades of blue. By using lighter shades and a black filler, you can mix the amount of darkness you ...


1

There is no "correct" way to do it. There are many, many different ways and all of them are equally correct. Are you looking to reduce it to spot color or is it full color printing? Does the resolution or color depth of their printing process require dithering? These all matter greatly for proper selection of how to convert the image. If it is truely ...



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