Road Train !!!!!!!!!!

by Russell McMahon

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35

You've asked several different questions, so here goes: How effective is it? It is a lot more effective in cameras that have it than those that don't. Not trying to be a smarty-pants, but since most manufacturers adopted automatic self cleaning systems, the number of complaints regarding dusty sensors went down by several orders of magnitude. See labnut's ...


32

Do not clean your lens (too much). Cleaning marks are by far the most common source of damage to lenses. Shooting under normal conditions, it takes a large amount of dust and grime to have any effect. The same approach applies to filters; good filters use the same type of glass and coatings as your lens (though perhaps not the same absolute quality). ...


23

If acids in human's breath are enough to degrade Nikon lenses, I think that's the best argument yet for buying any other brand. I've been involved in photography for 27 years. This is the first I've ever heard of "harmful acids in breath" that could harm a lens. I don't believe I've been living under a rock. I could be wrong, and my lenses could be days ...


18

Some dust spots on the sensor will absolutely not shift with air-pressure (blowing) alone. To shift them you need to wet clean the sensor. I was nervous the first time I did this as I can understand most people would be. But it is not that difficult or risky, basically it involves wiping the sensor assembly with a soft rubber "wand" with a cleaning fluid ...


17

A rocket blower can be worse than not cleaning at all. it inhales air from your environment - which can be dustier than your sensor. I use Pec Pad (pecpads) and Eclipse cleaning solution, with a sensor swipe. This link has all of these products in the search. It works well to remove spots. A tip - take a picture of a clear blue sky at f/22 to identify ...


17

If I understand your question correctly, stopping the aperture down to its narrowest ensures that light is focused as tightly as possible. If you take a photograph at a wider aperture, excess non-incident light will still make it to the sensor, and mitigate the effects of sensor dust. To put that in more precise technical terms...with a narrow aperture, the ...


17

For all the following: YMMV*, caveat emptor, no responsibility taken for advice given, you decide whether to try this at home. It may even work :-). Be aware that damage may already be fatal and/or that fatal (to the lens) damage may occur along the way. Best attitude is to regard the lens as a writeoff now, with anything you can gain from it by the methods ...


16

I'm willing to bet that that's dust on your sensor, not on the lens. If you stop down to f/22, that can help to confirm that assertion, one way or the other. My sensor dust would really show up at the smaller apertures. If they are indeed on the sensor (and they really look like the dust spots I got on my d70 and d200), you can try some of the Visible ...


16

Don't use that lens because in that case, there will be chance that water enters in the camera body and make a fatal damage. Stop using it immediately to avoid short circuit and/or ruining your camera body (and ruining this lens permanently) Take it to a nearby camera service center. If you still have warranty, then better contact them first. Best of ...


15

I've not seen this recommended for a number of reasons: The high-pressure air can cause dust to move from a bad place to a worse place (as opposed to being removed altogether). The condensation caused by the pressure drop & cooling of the compressed air causes stuff to get frosty. This should be temporary, but isn't likely to help in the short run. ...


14

I haven't done any analisys, but here is my take on this. There is no doubt that Nikon knows what they are talking about when it comes to lenses and lens care. However, in this case I suspect they are covering their butt. Unfortunately manufacturers are driven to do that more and more because every once in a while someone does something stupid, perhaps ...


13

A controversial subject! One tip: don't over-clean. There's no need to keep your lens free of minor dust or worry about minor goop spots or even scratches. For an extreme example, check out this lens.


12

If the dust was really on the sensor proper, you'd be absolutely correct. At least in the normal case, it's virtually impossible for dust to get on the surface of the sensor itself, because there's a couple millimeters or so of filters directly in front of the sensor. The front-most of these is (at least in the usual case) the AA filer. The important thing ...


12

A self cleaning sensor is never necessary but is always nice. At the end of this post I've described Checking for Sensor Dust. This is not wholly intuitive and this method may be of value to others. Dust will "pump" through many zoom lenses as they are zoomed in and out. internal volume increases or decreases and air is drawn in and expelled. Some are ...


12

Most cloths can be used actually without damaging the lens. However some may leave the lens with lint or fabric residue. The most important thing is that it must be completely clean and untreated by any chemicals. Cloths used in gloves or jackets often has water resistant coatings which may not be liked be the lens. The main reason for not using a sleeve is ...


10

Microfiber cloths are pretty much all I've ever used to wipe off things like fingerprints and smudges.


10

I've cleaned the inside (bottom side of prism) recently of my 30D. You can easily spot the viewfinder element when you take off the lens. I then use the same sensor swabs and eclipse fluid as I use for the sensor. I suggest you bend the sensor swab stick 90 deg so you can sweep is more easily across the viewfinder. I think I also cut off a bit of the sensor ...


10

It is possible to wash most of them in a washing machine -- just be careful not to use any fabric softener. If you're ultra-paranoid about your glass (like me), you may want to write off any dirty cloths for use as screen wipes, or pass to relatives for use as glasses wipes, and replace with a brand new cloth for your lenses.


10

I can't speak to the microfiber cloths specifically, but often the Canon/Nikon-branded small accessories like this really are nothing special. For example, I had some Canon lens cleaning fluid and it was pretty much crap. Stuff like this isn't actually made by them anyway - it's 3rd parties that license the brands. I've not had great experience with ...


10

Take your camera to an authorized repair center and have it thoroughly cleaned. Sounds to me you've more than a small mote of dust in there, given where you've been and what happened I'd be worried about mold too.


10

You asked how effective the sensor dust removal systems are for Nikon and Canon cameras and whether they have improved. To answer the questions I searched the DPReview forums for mentions of sensor dust. The search was conducted first for the entire period of all known postings and then for the last 12 months only. The search of all postings confirmed ...


10

I do it regularly, I don't regard it as difficult. It's not that risky in the grand scheme of things but it's riskier than it used to be, especially with larger full frame sensors. Before the useless "self cleaning" function was implemented, the low pass filter assembly sat right on the sensor. Now there is an air gap to facilitate vibrating the LPF in order ...


10

C is the correct answer. Well, actually it's A if you look at the sensor from the back, but my guess is that you will turn the camera around and access the sensor from the front. So it's C.


10

Washing it thoroughly in fresh water is better than doing nothing. I have "saved" a cellphone that was dropped in a bucket of concentrated water/chlorine solution and a radio pager that was dropped in salt water - in each case by very very very thorough washing in fresh cold water with no cleaning agents and long slow drying. A lens MAY respond to the same ...


10

Well, the viewfinder itself is not going to cause infections, but some of the germs that cause conjunctivitis are highly contagious. If you're passing your camera to people with red eye, ask them to wash their hands and to use the LCD screen instead. In general, though, these germs are not particularly long-lived away from a human host. Just letting the ...


10

When it is dirty, no more or less often than that. If you can't see any obvious dirt or fingerprints then don't touch the lens surface at all with anything. Every time you touch a lens element it's an opportunity for damage so it's not really worth it unless the dirt is visible in your output.


9

Dust inside the lens shouldn't be a problem, as it will always be thrown out of focus enough as not to make a difference. Even on the smallest apertures, the depth of field won't extend far enough forwards to make it visible. If it really bothers you, take it to an independent photo shop and see if they offer lens servicing.


9

Hopefully you have wiped the stuff before turning the camera off, otherwise there is probably some of it inside it. There is nothing self-cleaning here and neither is this camera sealed against dust and particles from entering. It's a great camera you have, so I would bring it to Canon for a cleaning. They will take the camera apart and clean it. Here this ...



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