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19

Chromatic Aberration is a distortion that occurs when a lens focuses different colours slightly differently. It is caused by the refractive index of the lens (the amount that the lens bends light) being slightly different for different colours, so I suppose you could say it is caused by physical properties of the lens. It is possible to produce higher ...


14

That is definitely not chromatic aberration. It looks like an artistic effect inspired by Anaglyph images, which are those old style 3D images that used red and blue goggles. Edit: On further inspection it appears to actually be an anaglyph image, although it is of course possible that this was used as an artistic effect.


14

What you're seeing is longitudinal chromatic aberration (otherwise known as axial colour), whereby the light at the edge of the bokeh disc undergoes a colour shift depending on whether it is in front of or behind plane of focus. The reason for this is that light of different wavelengths focus at different distances along the axis of the lens. This is very ...


11

I think the dog is in focus, but it's not sharp. And it's not sharp because a magnifying glass isn't corrected for any aberrations, chromatic or otherwise. In other words, it's a technically poor lens (though you're still welcome to have some fun with it, of course). Lenses focus light by slowing it down as it passes through the glass, which bends the rays ...


10

I don't think these are quite the answers you want, since all of them involve changing the composition in some form, and these are probably already obvious to you, but: Wait until a different time of day (like evening or early morning or nighttime) so there is less contrast between the building and the sky. Or wait until a cloudy day. Move to a different ...


8

Chromatic Aberration can be a bit tricky, and in many cases you can't actually correct the fringing, only the color cast, caused by CA. In LR 3, you have two ways to correct lens aberrations. The first, and most simple, is to use a lens profile which should automatically correct for ALL lens aberrations in your shot, including CA, distortion, and vignetting. ...


8

I've done this myself in the past. If you look at the nature of the CA you should be able to work out an effective way to correct it. If you see red/cyan fringing, e.g. black objects are fringed with red on the outside and cyan on the inside, then you can increase the size of the red channel slightly; it takes trial and error but it does work to some ...


7

"Good lighting" for outside pictures is pretty much dusk or dawn. If you're getting a harsh reflection of the sun at this point, you should be able to easily rotate a bit and get the sun out of your frame. In fact, some of the best light is just before the sun rises and just after it sets. There's still plenty of light to shoot with - especially for ...


7

The answer depends on what type of CA you're dealing with. Lateral CA fix it in post. This is easy and effective, plus there's no shooting technique I know of to reduce it (other than zooming if the CA is worse at the wide end). Longitudinal (axial) CA stop down Purple fringing avoid strong contrasts, might help to underexpose to avoid sensor bloom.


7

There are a limited set of defects that can be corrected in software, lateral chromatic aberration, yes, but not longitudinal chromatic aberration. Lateral CA results in the component colours of light being displaced radially across the sensor. This can be corrected by simply warping each colour channel slightly differently. Longitudinal CA causes out of ...


6

Not only is it possible, but it's becoming commonplace. The micro-four-thirds system makes extensive use of it, and some compact cameras now do too. (I imagine that if they don't yet, most super-zooms will within a few years.) Digital Photography Review has a good article on this at ...


6

There's no way to avoid it since its inherent in the lens. A better quality lens will have less chromatic aberrations. One way to correct it is using lightroom. Here's a quick tutorial: http://www.dpnotes.com/how-to-reduce-chromatic-aberration-using-adobe-photoshop-lightroom/


6

A circular polarizing filter will go a long way to eliminate the reflected light from the water. But you might also want to go in the opposite direction, and try to work out a composition that embraces the reflection, rather than eliminate it. For example, longer exposures that turn the glints into something more silky might get you something nice.


6

I think the search phrase you're looking for is "DIY toy lens". This will lead you to a number of interesting projects, including this one made from toy magnifying glasses like the one you were playing with. The basic construction is quite simple: an extension tube is used to mount a tube of cardboard to the camera, and the lenses mounted within that tube. ...


6

My best guess is that it may have to do with how the satellite operates. It may capture red green and blue images separately and then combine them. If this is the case, then two things would happen. First, the plane would move between shots for each color. Second, the satellite would move quite a bit as well. While the motion of the satellite could be ...


6

I think what we see here is not the traditional lateral chromatic aberration. This is appearing in the center of the image, in more or less blurred area, the color is blue and purple and is dependent on an f-stop. I think it is a combination of axial chromatic aberration and spherical aberration. Some thoughts: This is probably shot at very short ...


5

This is called Purple Fringing. "Purple fringing" is a spectral phenomenon which it occurs (it doesn't all the time! It's very dependent on the conditions) it is visible in big sized displays or prints. The smaller, the less visible. In practice, that limits the number of times that it is a problem! Purple fringing usually occurs in high contrast parts of ...


5

AJ is correct here. What you are seeing is the result of motion blur as both the satellite and the aircraft are in motion relative to the ground (the desired target of the photo). Those pretty pictures you see in Google Earth and elsewhere are the result of red, green, and blue filtered images combined into what is called a "Multispectral" image (MSI), named ...


5

The purple tinge to the lights in your photograph has been caused by longitudinal chromatic aberration, which results when using a wide aperture, meaning the blue and red components of the spectrum are not focused as sharply as the rest. It can also manifest as a green tinge, or even both where there are specular highlights either side of the plane of focus. ...


4

This looks to me like either lateral or longitudinal chromatic aberration. Lateral chromatic aberration occurs in a lens system when the lens does not have exactly the same magnification for light of all wavelengths. Hence the image in red light is a different size to the image in blue light, and so white highlights have fringing. Longitudial chromatic ...


4

This is called Chromatic Aberration (CA). In photography its is also known as Purple Fringing. It occurs because lenses have a different refractive index for different wavelengths of light. The refractive index decreases with increasing wavelength. Its most visible when you shoot a dark object against a bright background. To overcome this problem totally, ...


4

I just started noticing this issue on my 1.4 lens as well. I've been using this guy's method to fix it, since Camera Raw doesn't do much on this type of aberration: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XOIz8irPuGo Basically it involves making a copy of your background layer, blurring the heck out of it, switching it to a Color layer, applying a layer mask to ...


4

When light enters or exits glass at an angle, it bends. But the different colours in the light bend by a different amount. Lenses try to correct for this by sandwiching together different densities of glass, but they have to take compromises - there's no such thing as perfect as it would compromise on something else. So you may still see colour fringes, ...


4

If you split your image into red, green and blue channels, and then: Leave the green channel alone. Scale the red channel up slightly, around the centre of the image Blur (slightly) the outside of the red channel: you could use a radial followed by rotational blur to do this. Scale the blue channel down more than you scaled the red channel up, still about ...


4

If you shoot RAW, the in-camera lens correction is not directly applied to the RAW data, it is appended to the tagged data. The lens correction is applied to the in-camera preview JPEG thumbnail viewed on the camera's screen. If your selected camera output is JPEG then the in-camera lens correction is applied at the time the file is processed in camera. As ...


4

This only matters for JPEG (and the embedded JPEG previews). I would say it comes down to which you like better. If you're shooting JPEG it'd be nice to have it done in camera. You would probably get better results from the camera as it can (though depending on the implementation, may not) use the RAW data for its corrections whereas LR would be using the ...


4

Obviously, chromatic aberration is created by the lens, and the amount of CA is the same. However, film as a medium and the sensor respond a bit differently. True perpendicular light is handled in a similar way in both, but angled light meets a different surface when using film and when using a CMOS sensor. CMOS sensors have tiny lenses over the color ...


3

You'll have more CA by using fast glass, i.e. where the ratio of focal length to diameter is smaller; for more chromatic aberrations, you'll want to avoid achromatic lenses. Along with CA, faster lens will also make image more misty (spheric aberrations); you can reduce that by stopping the lens down using an aperture disc (I cut mine out of a plastic ...


3

Buy a better lens. Otherwise, shoot in RAW and fix it in post-processing.


3

Lightroom 4 is a huge win if you have Chromatic Aberration. However, it addresses the problem differently than previous versions and in fact, than most other tools. Scroll down to the Lens Corrections panel, and click on "Color". Then check the "Remove Chromatic Aberration" checkbox. This alone may help. However, you can dial it in: What sort of CA do you ...



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