Serene Life

by garik

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22

Unlikely to be Image Stabilisation @Dan, that's a good question. I suspect that most of us have a problem with blurry images more often that we would like. It's unlikely that Image Stabilisation is causing this problem. I have certainly never had this problem myself. However, IS reduces camera shake - that probably isn't your problem. So, what could ...


19

Legal Disclaimer The following is for general information purposes only and should not be taken as legal advice for any particular situation. If you have a specific concern you should consult with an attorney familiar with the relevant issues in the jurisdiction in question. Since the questioner indicated they were located in the U.S., this answer assumes ...


18

I agree that you'll probably eventually want both (no one said that this is a cheap hobby!), but I'd go with the flash first. It's easier to use quickly, and works well when you have multiple subjects not necessarily side-by-side — or when your kid won't stay within the in-focus area for for than a millisecond. With indoor lighting, even a wide-open fast ...


18

You've got plenty of megapixels... don't worry about that. Here are some other tips for photos of children: use props: kids love to play with toys, balls, chairs, tables, etc. In addition to helping to occupy their attention you can add an interesting visual element to the photo. shoot from their eye level. Far too many photos that parents take have the ...


17

I tend to go for the prime before the flash, and here's why: Flash adds weight and bulk to your camera. Once your 9 month old starts trying to grab the camera from your hands, better to have a lighter camera so that if/when s/he succeeds, they won't hurt themselves when they drop it. They also have less handholds of things they can pull apart. Flash ...


13

It is very highly dependent on the personality of the child. What works wonderfully for my daughter (Positive Feedback) may not work for other kids. So it helps if you already have a good handle on working with the child. With that said, here is what works for me: Positive Feedback My 3 year old is very appreciative of positive feedback. If I laugh at a ...


12

I have been taking images of children recently and found that those closer to 2 have not wanted to pose in anyway shape or form! My most successful have included setting up a studio area and defining where the children need to be, then letting them play with toys, dance to music and chat away to each other. In doing this I got some nice relaxed poses. I ...


12

It's unlikely to be IS. If it is, then IS is seriously broken. It's generally safe to leave it on all the time except when you are using a (very firm) tripod. That said, with a moving child from close range, IS really isn't likely to have much of an effect. What it could be, from most to least likely: Subject moving in and out of focus. By the time ...


12

No question: adding an external flash. See previous question Prime lens or flash: which upgrade will most improve baby photos?, which covers some of this. A flash can freeze motion, and makes it easy to get enough depth of field to get the whole scene in focus. And when you can move the flash off camera, you can create nice light where it doesn't exist ...


11

In a situation like this there is no substitute for a faster lens. Kids are a challenge to photograph at the best of times but with low light you only have two options flash which kids tend to hate or a faster larger aperture lens. Something like an f/1.8 or f/1.4 prime lens aren't too expensive and let in a lot more light than your kit lens which is f/3.5 ...


10

Legal Disclaimer The following is for general information purposes only and should not be taken as legal advice for any particular situation. If you have a specific concern you should consult with an attorney familiar with the relevant issues in the jurisdiction in question. The question includes the following and the answer below should be considered with ...


9

Give her a camera? That's all I had to do with mine. :)


9

A pop-up flash has barely enough power to work indoors of a residential space; in larger rooms, professional photographers have practical reasons why they carry separate large flashguns. The Puffer, whilst making the light slightly less harsh and therefore more pleasing, does it so at the expense of chewing the power even further down. So, your gear is ...


9

In each of your shots, the adult takes up much more percentage of the frame than the child, therefore it "dominates" the scene. To avoid this, you can try the following things: Place the Adult near a border of the frame and don't show the whole body, place the child more near the center. (Always depending on your composition and what you want to tell) Use ...


9

In your first photo, sitting in the grass, the adult is centered in the frame. There's no way around that: the bigger adult being in the center of the frame is going to dominate and hold the viewers attention. In that photo, you can recompose/crop to make the adult not be centered to better balance the scene. Similarly, notice how much grass surrounds the ...


8

Yes - but for indoor shots of fast moving kids, I'd highly recommend a good flash first. You'll be guaranteed to freeze that motion regardless of the lens. Indoors, in low light, with fast moving subjects - I'd choose a flash over a f/1.8 lens. With that lens, you'd still have to crank your ISO considerably to get motion freezing results, but a flash ...


8

When photographing kids, megapixels don't matter. What matters more is the ability to focus and take the picture before the child escapes from the picture. Generally DSLRs are better in this regard, but recent compact cameras might work well enough for you. If you're shooting indoors an external flash might help to freeze the movement and improve lighting ...


8

AJ's Checklist For Children's Parties Just my twopence worth - should make a good starting point... Set autofocus mode to AI Servo (the Nikon term is AF-C) Put your ETTL/ITTL flash on your camera Put a sto-fen on the flash Angle the flash up at 45 degrees or more Set white balance to flash Set exposure mode to apperture priority Set apperture to f/5.6 ...


8

I don't think another lens is necessarily what you need, although since 50mm is a bit narrow indoors on a Rebel XS, you may want to consider something a bit wider. (The question Will a 35mm lens work for great indoor pictures of my kids? asks about Nikon but the answers will apply in general.) A Rebel-series camera has a sensor which is about 22mm wide, ...


7

You can definitely take better pictures of small children with a single shot and you don't even have to be an experienced photographer (but you do need a good camera, see last paragraph). I'm not an experienced photographer, I mostly take pictures of my two (very fast) children and I used to think continuous drive is a great advantage in photographing ...


7

When there are many choices and no single "right answer" I like to let my children be involved in the decision making. Therefore I recommend this approach. Find a camera store with a good selection in your price range AND a sales person you feel can work well with your daughter to help her make her selection. Discuss your goals with the sales person and ...


7

As it's practically a once in a lifetime situation you might want to consider hiring a professional photographer. If nothing else it should eliminate the stress. The other thing to do is PRACTICE. Practice, practice, practice. This is one of the things that separates professionals from hobbyists. Take the camera with you everywhere and take a shot of ...


7

The easiest technique - have the child cover up part of the adult. Place the child in front of the adult - either sitting in the adults lap or standing where the adult may be sitting. If you shoot them as two separate subjects they'll always look uneven.


6

Wise sage says, "To photograph a child you must be as a child." In other words you have to be able to communicate with them, at their level on their level. Have fun! Beyond that your job is to direct the child in a way that doesn't feel like direction. Compose by moving around your scene in a way that feels like a game. Have your settings dialed in before ...


6

Based on your requirements a DSLR is necessary. The main point is your focus on indoor photography, this requires at least a large sensor camera, so either a DSLR or SLD. No point-and-shoot gets close to those in terms of performance, although you may have seen very expensive fixed-lens cameras like the Fuji X100 which can do it, but that one has NO zoom. ...


6

Since you say "Photography seems to be an upcoming hobby for me in recent past", I think you should get a system camera of some sort. That means a camera with interchangeable lenses and other dedicated accessories (like hotshoe flash options). Usually, that means an SLR, but there's a relatively new class of mirrorless interchangeable lens digital cameras ...


6

For this exact use I suggest a compact camera with easily accessible manual controls. All those have point-and-shoot modes too and fun features for kids like selective color, color swap, etc (which my daughter played a lot with when she got a camera at 6). Today this would be a Canon Powershot SX150 or other SX-series cameras like the SX220. The SX150 is ...


5

Patience Camera Lots of Memory Sense of humor Napkins/tissues/paper towels for cleaning up faces (depending on ages of subjects) Brush/comb and maybe detangling solution Patience


5

I ended up buying both! Like you, I've got a D5000 and I am now the proud owner of a 35mm f1.8 and a SB-400. I started with the lens, which has allowed me to take some really nice photos of my baby niece indoors. However, I found that I still needed a flash sometimes when the light really isn't that good. Bouncing the flash and/or using a diffuser makes a ...



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