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13

NimH battery care and feeding has occupied too much of my life in recent years. :-) It is significantly better for NimH batteries NOT to discharge them fully before recharging them. NimH life can be enhanced substantially by never discharging them fully on any occasion. Even when using multiple sets during a day's shooting, if you can manage to leave the ...


9

If the batteries are multi-celled, then yes, full discharge is good, once every couple of months. There are sensors that combine readings from multiple cells to determine capacity and balance the cells to improve efficiency and overal capacity. Other than that, Li-Ion still prefers shallow discharges. To maximize Li-Ion batteries' life, store them in cold ...


9

You can buy dedicated accessories for charging all kinds of stuff, or you can spend a little more and get a car converter 12V -> 110V, or 220V, depending on what your chargers need. Then you can connect just about any standard device to it, as long as its current (wattage) requirements are not too high. Here is one similar to one I have and it came in ...


7

The Nikon P330 camera uses a Nikon EN-EL12 1050 mAh battery. EN-EL12 battery capacity is nominally 1050 mAh as supplied. After market batteries may claim higher capacities and, regardless of label, may have lower capacities. If the charge rate is not limited by the camera itself when in-camera charging, or when externally charging the battery, maximum ...


6

In Europe the voltage is 230v, so if your adapter operates outside the 220-240v range you have to buy some kind of adapter doing the conversion. Also, Italy, France, Switzerland and Austria all have different power outlet shapes, but there is a common plug called "Europlug" which works on all four countries ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Europlug ). Get an ...


6

Yes, this charger will work. You can see from the specifications in the picture that it will accept a range of voltage from 100 to 240V. That includes Japan on the lowest side, and the US / North America at 110, and Europe at 230V. You will just need a physical plug adapter, which you can get pretty much anywhere. The countries you are visiting all have ...


6

If you want an official Canon accessory, you can use the CB-570 Car Battery Cable. It works with the CG-570 Battery Charger and is listed on the accessories page for the 50d. As others mentioned, a power inverter is also a more general solution, though converting from DC to AC back to DC will use additional power and put additional strain on your ...


6

I haven't yet found any third party batteries that has a chip in them. As you say, using a battery without the chip doesn't provide the camera with power level metering. Not knowing exacly how much power there is left is of course a bit inconvenient, but that can also cause other problems. The camera uses the power level information to shut down safely when ...


5

You can do it; Thom Hogan has a detailed explanation of his solar charging setup. As D. Lambert says though, it might still be more economical to just take a bunch of batteries. For example, I get 500-1000 frames out of my D90 on one charge in decent weather, so two batteries is more than enough for a week -- and at this rate, one battery corresponds to ...


5

What you are looking for is the "Canon ACK-E10 AC Adapter Kit" which does not charge your camera but instead allows it to run off of AC power. But keep in mind that the 1100D/Rebel T3 is only going to allow you to record 17 to 29 minutes of video at a time. You will have to stop and start a new recording every 17 to 29 minutes depending on the settings you ...


4

Is there a way to charge a battery while still in the camera? Yes, it's definitely doable. It carries some risk but it's something I'd happily do if required. [My day job is an EE with much involvement with batteries and charging - having somebody who knows their stuff help on this would be "a good idea"[tm] Some cameras have DC input for a remote power ...


4

Not sure that this belongs on the photography site, but personally I'm a fan of the La Crosse charger (BC-9009 or BC-700). It charges each individual battery, offers a basic recharge, a discharge for prolonging the life, and a refresh for restoring old batteries or getting new ones up to their peak (it runs it through multiple discharge/recharge cycles). ...


3

From what I can see the charger has the two pin plug, so that is compatible with the europlug used in most european countries, including all the ones you listed. You might stumble on an older socket installation for example in Italy, but they have the same current so you only need a converter for those. Modern sockets are compatible with both older and ...


3

I'd recommend going with a decently rated power inverter: One example would be this "can sized" version from Rosewill. That way you can use it with the standard charger, plus it's not a single purpose item.


3

As far as power drain is concerned, yes it will drain power. Will it harm your device has many other factors to it. Current will flow through transformer circuit. If you consider that as a factor that might harm your device, then it will. Giving complete technical details will be a little difficult here, but i'll try to explain with links to detail. A ...


2

You wouldn't want to charge the battery while it's in the camera, unless the camera is actually built to handle the charging itself. When charging the battery you use a higher voltage than the battery puts out, so that could fry your camera. Having the camera turned off doesn't help either, as that doesn't break the contact with the battery. The camera ...


2

Obviously it's a little easier if you can get a USB charger, but no worries- this is still pretty easy. What you are looking for is a "power pack". These are accessory batteries with USB and/or inverters built in. They are generally designed to charge a laptop on the go, so running small(er) battery chargers is even easier. Here's an older model on Amazon ...


2

Suitability varies with camera facilities and with quality of the charger, but in many cases you will have no problems doing this. Usually a special adaptor will be needed but, in this case, it is probably a matter of "plug in and go". The EX-1 camera has an unusual feature - it will accept charging input from a 5 Volt "USB" power source and charge the ...


2

This comment applies to camera Lithium Ion batteries in general. Based on personal experience, clone batteries CAN be about as good as a genuine one, but may not be. Weight should be similar. Low weight is definitely fake but correct weight may be fake too. Capacity should be as good as claimed from new. This is not trivial to determine but also not ...


2

One thing that stood out about the lp-e8 battery for me was the feel. Compared to an lp-e6, the surface is actually textured, almost a little rough, instead of the usual smooth feel. I can say from that image, that the battery charger does look different than what I have. Also, compare with the product in the official store. Battery Charger


2

I imagine any electric component has a certain life span. When the charger is plugged in, even without battery, there's still some current flowing and some heat generating. However, the current and heat are minimal on stand by. So, I would answer: technically - yes, it is harming the charger, but practically - no, it isn't. The charger will eventually break ...


2

Check out the FreeLoader Pro from Solar Technologies in the UK. I bought one online last year, and it's worked okay for me so far, charging the Li-ion "brick" battery for my Canon 350D, although I admit I haven't actually used it that much. Comes with adaptors for different models of mobile phone too.


2

It sort of depends on what sort of charger you can find for your camera batteries, I think. Most popular cameras have aftermarket chargers that'll work with a 12V power supply (a car outlet, for example), but that's a pretty big solar panel. The smaller panels generally put out enough juice to power a USB device, which is 5V. I considered the same thing, ...


2

The problem with rechargeable batteries is they are always lower capacity and usually have different voltage ranges. Capacity matters a great deal for high draw items like a flash. Voltage range tolerance depends on the specific equipment (manufacturers never specify). 900mAh seems to be the highest a rechargeable can get compared to the standard 1500mAh. ...


1

You could look at the voltages, or in the case of this kind of equipment look for a CE mark which confirms that a device is certified to be compatible with the appropriate EU standards. I've ringed it for ease of identification. You will still require some kind of socket adapter depending on which country you're visiting. Adapters are usually available ...


1

It's possible, but unlikely. The USB 2.0 (maybe 2.1?) standard specifies 500 mA max standard current. If the camera came with a 500 mA charger (the extra 50 mA is likely just a bit of available overhead), then the in-camera charging-circuitry is most likely set to max out at 500 mA, as per the standard. There are a few types of higher-current USB sockets ...


1

7D: $1600. Canon battery: $60. 3rd-party battery: $40. Difference as percentage of camera price: 1% I've seen several different investigations of generic batteries, and while many of them are quite good, the actual capacity varies wildly. In some cases, when you factor that in, you're actually getting more for your money for the brand-name batteries. ...



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