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20

Fundamentally they are the same thing in a different package but they work differently. SD cards use their own protocol which was extended to go beyond 2 GB up to 32 GB with the introduction of SDHC (there were a few 4GB SD cards but not very compatible) and then to support up to 2 TB with the introduction of SDXC. The SD to SDHC transition if you remember ...


14

It depends. My last camera only connected at USB1.1 speeds, so was slower than using a USB2.0 card reader. However, if your camera can do USB2.0 or you have a USB1.1 or USB1.0 card reader, you wont see that benefit. You can get Firewire or ExpressCard card readers for CF cards, which are faster than USB2.0, (and I think generally limited by the speed of ...


10

CompactFlash came out in 1994, while Secure Digital came out in 1999. Five extra years of adoption helps explain why higher-end cameras support CF over SD (and vice versa). Pros tend to standardize; they buy a lot at once, have supporting equipment to match, and don't want to switch frequently. Thus professional standards have higher market inertia, and end ...


9

There is an advantage to Compact-Flash cards which you get with the fastest models and sufficiently fast camera. This is not what accounts for most of the price difference, volume is. SD cards are sold on considerably higher volume than CF ones. When CF cards were more popular, it used to be the opposite. Nowadays, I would not worry at all about this. The ...


6

This is a known limitation of the Canon Rebel XT. You can only format up to an 8GB card in camera, but should not have a problem using other commonly available cards in it(as long as they are formatted outside of the camera). I had a Rebel XT and can attest to also encountering this issue. One may also suggest that above 8GB in the Rebel XT is too big. You ...


5

This depends on a number of factors but, in general, it would be true. The primary reason is that many readers are not attached via USB and so are not limited by the speed of the USB bus and are also not sharing the bandwidth of the USB bus with other devices. However, if your CF reader is USB, it wouldn't likely be much faster, if at all. Anyways, it can be ...


4

Change the playback from slot 1 to slot 2. You'll see (and be able to delete) the photos on your SD card. From the camera, you cannot delete the "paired" files. They are totally separate and the camera doesn't connect them logically. That having been said, I would caution you against this process. If you need more than 32g for a session, either buy ...


4

Compact Flash cards always come formatted, just like all other types of flash memory. If it was not formatted, the camera would have been unable to shoot. What is going on is that your computer is unable to recognize the card's file-system. This sometimes happens with an incompatible reader or older operating system. This is highly likely because of the ...


4

I can't find any specifics for the 7D that are helpful. Normally I would look to the Rob Galbraith CF/SD Performance Database, though the newest cameras aren't listed there. According to the dpreview.com 7D review's performance section, the camera maxed out when shooting raw with a Sandisk Extreme Pro card. So, one conclusion could be that the camera is ...


4

The main difference in cost probably comes from economies of scale. For a long time SD cards were more expensive, but now they've become cheaper as they've become easier to manufacture and require less materials. Meanwhile, due to their bulk, consumers have fallen out of favor with CF and prefer SD. Additionally, the architecture of the cards is ...


3

For video I believe the requirements would be a card that can write 10 MB/s (mega bytes per second). This equals to 66x speed for a Compact Flash card. For shooting stills it's possible to get a longer burst with a faster card. If you want maximum burst length, get the quickest CF card you can afford. The math would be: 66 * 150kB/s = 9900kB/s ~ 10MB/s ...


3

Compactflash cards are much more sturdy. SD cards flex and get squashed, so unless you have them on your camera (like if you carry extra like most serious photographers) it is much better to use CF cards. They also have better bandwidth with more pins, but mostly you wont notice that since the camera interface and cardreaders cannot fully utilize it unless ...


3

First of all, I always recommend a card reader instead of a direct USB connection. It will be faster, you don't need special software, and it doesn't use your battery while downloading. I prefer the current USB 3.0 readers but many options exist. This looks like what you are looking for: GNU Canon Camera Utilities - http://canoncam.sourceforge.net/ I ...


3

If you have removed the card from the camera and put a new one in (that is known to be good) then it sounds like you already have your answer. It is possible that the card (rather than the reader) was shorted out and that it damaged the reader both on the computer and in the camera. If that is the case, then there is a good chance you need to have the ...


3

The speed at which you can import the photos is governed by the card type and the cable you use to connect to your computer, so first make sure you have the fastest type of card available. Lexar make a Firewire 800 card reader which is stackable, so you can link two or more together as FW800 allows you to daisy chain devices in series. If you use a Mac you ...


2

Depends on your budget. If your camera is in warrantee you may actually be able to get a free repair from canon. Budget: $500 and under I would recommend buying a used camera. Any old camera used will do: canon 50d, canon xt, etc. As long as the person hasn't used registered their camera warantee you're in good shape. I would inspect any pictures etc. ...


2

Don't forget, that the USB channel has bandwidth limitations. USB 2.0 spec High Speed is 480 Mbps (megabits per second). This means that an 8GB card can theoretically transfer in 134 seconds. Firewire 800, can do this in 80 seconds (Firewire 400 in 160 sec). Now, this is theoretical, because every USB or Firewire device connnected utilizes bandwidth. If ...


1

There is not a obvious PTP/Mass Storage device option with any of the following Canon cameras I have owned: Rebel XTi, 50D, 5DII, or 7D. To the best of my knowledge this is true of all Canon DSLRs. Data exchange follows the PIMA 15740-2000 protocol, but with minor differences. But these differences preclude using the camera as a mass storage device without ...


1

Speed is always relative. What is the speed of the current CF card you are using? What is the speed of the microSD card you wish to use? What is the maximum throughput of the SD->CF adapter? In terms of both read and in your case, more importantly, write speed? What is the maximum speed that the camera you are using is capable? The determining factor in the ...


1

Here are some possibilities File corrupts on your CF card, try another one File corrupts while transferring to your computer, try using a different memory card reader, avoid using cheap chinese reader / cables and USB hubs. And also do not use the front panel USB sockets of your desktop computer, these, in general, use very cheap and unshielded cables. ...


1

Are you connecting the Compact Flash via the camera or in a separate reader? This is usally less of a problem with Windows7 so are you using Windows XP? The data is not missing as such it is just that the file system between camera and your computer are not reading the data. First, try connecting the CF Card in another computer preferably with Windows7. ...


1

I don't know how you could tell the age of the card, but I think it is more important to know roughly how many shots it has recorded, to format it regularly, (the formatting will remove wilting parts of the card), and, depending how often you use it, throwing it away after an amount of time that suits you, ie. a year maybe. Then mark the new one with the ...


1

CF cards – just like any other storage media – fail every now and then. In general, when a storage media fails, the symptoms may "look strange" from the perspective of the computer, camera, or any other device that tries to access it. Don't try to over-interpret them; it just failed. You might be able to recover something – for recovery tips, see these two ...


1

So there are two main reasons to get a faster memory card: you fill up your camera's buffer when taking several pictures in quick succession (usually when you're using burst mode and saving lots of data, like in RAW+JPEG mode), and you want to get the pictures out of the buffer and onto the card faster (so you can take more pictures) you want to get your ...


1

I have one of these and they are great; you can download 4 CF cards at a time: http://www.techchee.com/2008/02/03/delkin-imagerouter-card-reader-connects-multiple-cf-cards/


1

I had the same problem last time. That too after a photoshoot. I could not read the card with the card reader or the camera itself. I use a Canon Rebel XT. But one format (OUCH!) and it was back up and running. Format should be on the camera itself. Also, after transfer of pictures make sure that you format the card in the camera. This should work fine. If ...


1

What tests have you done to check out the camera & CF cards? Would strongly suggest either checking the CF cards in another camera or borrow a known working CF card from someone and try it in your own camera. You may find your local camera store may help you out there as they would win a potential customer either way, a new camera or a new CF card. ...



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