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13

Location Find a spot with a clear view of a turn or a curve on the race track, and get as close to the ground as you possibly can. However, there will be tall fences around the race course in Baltimore to keep spectators out and flying debris in, so the view from the lowest seats might be partially obstructed. While the cars will be going faster on the ...


5

Not exactly a photography-specific answer, but I hope this helps. Tim Wallace seems like a very talented photographer, but I wouldn't underestimate the amount of post-production work that went into some of those photos. Folks with far more skills can give you pointers on how to get the best photo out of the camera, but in my experience you'll be spending ...


5

At full resolution, the line gets terrible. Perhaps I've missed something, but it sounds like you want to make the line between the light and dark parts of the wall as sharp as possible, more like the lights on the right hand side of this image than the ones on the left: In that case, as long as your camera is properly focussed in the first place, ...


3

Have you considered renting a faster long lens. The one you have is pretty slow. Charlotte is a big racetrack (Not as big as Daytona, but still big) and a 200mm is not going to get you close if you are up in the stands or in the infield. You might like the Nikon 200mm f/2G AF-S VR or the Sigma 120-300mm f/2.8 EX DG HSM


3

If they'll let you go there (which I kind of doubt) the inside of turn 3 (the hairpin) would be great. Second choice (and should still be really good) would be the chicane, around grandstands 26 and 27. Another good choice (but apparently more expensive) be inside turn 9. If at all possible I'd advise going to some sort of local races a bit first (doesn't ...


3

The Baltimore race is new, and a street circuit changes often with respect to the barrier material, so it is impossible to tell you where to take shots. For that, you will need to wander around the track, which is usually fairly easy. Don't stay in one spot in the stands. For IRL and ALMS races, credentialed photographers (those with proof they work for a ...


2

You have some good answers so far, but none really answer the "how to capture the action with a DSLR" part of your question. Here goes: File format Shooting JPEG will give you a faster burst rate, and you will fit more shots on your memory card. Shooting mode Use your camera's fastest continuous shooting speed. This will maximise your number of "keepers" ...


2

That map is really pretty good as far as pointing out interesting spots around the track. Hard-braking zones (turns 1, 3, 5) offer the best chance to catch a pass, or even contact between cars, while high-speed areas like the main straight would be a place to try some panning shots if you're fast. Since these cars don't have anti-lock brakes, watch for ...


2

Try to make the most of the provided lighting. There will undoubtedly be areas of the track that are lighter than others and the lighting will be coming from different directions. Either try to position (if this is an option), or spot the areas on the track where the lights are working for, not against you. If you have selected points on the track you ...


2

To get shadows with sharp edges, you need hard light. The smaller and the further away a light source is, the "harder" is its light. The sun is a good example for that. Technically, the rays of hard light are close to being parallel. No matter how hard the light is, the edge of the shadow can still be blurry. This is because there's a distance between the ...


2

It looks like you were using a flash and a high speed shutter because it appears you caught the shutter in motion (thus the large black wall). To get a well focused shot, if possible, pre-focus with the light on. Focus has a hard time operating in the dark, so providing extra light is the easiest way to allow it to focus and then remove the light before ...


2

Put your camera on a tripod, focus manually on the wall, and set aperture (probably a higher number, like f/11 to get deep DoF) and time manually, too. This way, you'll get consistent results over multiple shots.


2

Disclaimer: this assumes that you are sitting in the stands and don't have access to a special press area. Also, I've never been to a race at Charlotte but have been to races at Talladega (day) and Phoenix (both day and night). This is a long race and you should have time to try lots of settings to see what works best (ISO, aperture, shutter). I've had ...


2

Unfortunately, both your zoom lenses are quite slow. By contrast, a mate of mine uses a 400 f/4 or 200 f/2 for his action photography. You are right about the prime lens. It would perform much better, but of course you would need to crop later. If you're up-close however, it may be an option. With your current setup, I'd say to use the speed priority as ...


1

I'm usually not a fan of this, but you might look into renting some continuous lighting. The light output must be relatively high because you need to cover a large object. Because a car is so big compared to portrait or small product, it will be invaluable to have an accurate visual idea of how your lighting is shaping up. Also look into Kino flo lights to ...


1

When it's dark there are several ways you can take a shot which is properly exposed: Increase aperture Use a long shutter speed Increase ISO Use a flash I will treat the above points one-by-one for the situation you described. Increase aperture Your lens has a maximum aperture of f/4 when at 55mm and f/5.6 when at 200mm. So to get the aperture as big ...


1

Related to panning. PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE. I tried this at a airplane show, and it looks easier then it does. Maybe a tripod that gives good support, it can give you extra horizontal support. But you need to try, go outside and try it on some cars.... put it in burst mode and keep following the subject (even after you pressed the shutter!). Further ...


1

If you can't get close to your subject, don't even think about the flash. I'd use the 55-300 wide open and at 300mm, which is f/5.6. Set the ISO to 1600 and see what kind of shutter speed you get. The more, the better. Especially if you're cropping action shots, you can't have too fast of a shutter speed. :) Time your shots. During every activity, ...



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