Forgotten in its old age

by Aditya

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25

There is a good book which indeed does talk about photographing a canvas. It is the first book I would recommend someone who wants to learn about lighting. It is called Light: Science and Magic. (At this point: Anyone wants to have the previous edition of it? I think I'll get the new one. ;) ) The thing about the canvas is (I guess you have noticed so far ...


10

Resolution does matter, and what is required will depend on the size of the canvas. Typically, canvas printing services offer guidelines for minimum resolution. Some other considerations: Glossy vs matte. Not all services offer both. For the ones that don't, be sure to find out which they use. Border type. Black, white, and gallery borders are commonly ...


7

I would talk directly with the company you're using to produce the canvas prints. In general, I try to print at 300 ppi on photographic paper and 200 ppi on canvas. I've gone as low at 100 ppi on canvas with good results. Yours is just going to be slightly lower resolution. The closest I have to what you're doing is a 3600x2400 image printed on canvas at ...


6

When it comes to printing large, the native image size out of the camera doesn't mean much. A 60x20 inch print is very large, and print resolution is measured in PPI, or pixels per inch. Even the highest resolution cameras of today, such as 18mp-24mp sensors, do not produce enough native resolution to be printed that large...most top out around 17x20 native. ...


6

It all depends on the distance you want to view the image from. A billboard(20'x60') might look completely fine with an 10MP image, that is as low as 5dpi. I personally have printed canvas prints from images as low as about 70dpi without issues. They look great. Before I send them off though, I use software to resize them to the desired output. Most if ...


5

Canvas prints, sometimes also called Canvas Giclée, are very similar to traditional pigment on canvas paintings. So any time you're trying to fit into an "old world" type of environment, they are a very attractive option. The traditional stretched option lines up well for framing just like an old painting would, and the gallery wrap options mimmic more ...


4

Most modern large-format plotters used by specialist print companies can print on a variety of surfaces, including canvas, acetate, and Tyvek. I would think your best option is to print onto acetate (transparency) and fix that to the canvas board somehow, perhaps on top of or embedded in the resin you mentioned.


4

Most canvas prints use inks similar to (or actually are) big name inkjet inks like Epson and Canon. Such inks are susceptible to moisture and gaseous toxins and the like. Its kind of tough to generalize the print so much...all of the print houses you've listed use different kinds of canvas and different kinds of inks, and none of them really clearly specify ...


4

I work for http://www.canvaspop.com I can't speak for the other companies but I believe they use a spray varnish and I'm not sure how spray varnish holds up. We use a matte laminate (by Drytac) which would completely hold up in a bathroom for a long time. Our laminate seals the art piece from moisture making it waterproof. We've tested it in such extreme ...


4

Most printers will prefer images using the Adobe sRBG colour profile, but that can vary from printer to printer, so it is best to check with them. Resolution matters more on how an image is going to be viewed, and I wouldn't list that as a primary concern when getting something printed up. I've been happy with results from resolutions below 100dpi, which ...


3

When I printed a big canvas the company said their canvas printer was 150dpi. I had to enlarge my 10Mp image slightly (from 100dpi to 150) and it still looks really good. you will be going from 79dpi to 150 dpi with your image and intended size. What you can do is measure your monitor and view it at a zoom level so it shows the right amount of pixels per ...


3

To address the two specific materials you mentioned: Canvas is a great way to show larger works. Canvas is often best viewed from a distance; the textured surface means that things will look a little fuzzy/funky up close. On the other hand this can be a bonus in that a tack-sharp image isn't always necessary. Metal prints work well for images of all ...


2

You can also print on t-shirts, mousepads, jigsaws, tablemats... In terms of wall hangings the main options are canvas and acrylic. Canvas suits more abstract photos and to some extent covers up for detail lost through enlargement etc. that is to say it's less demanding on sharpness to look good. You can also print on the sides and give the price a chunky ...


2

If your bathroom is at all similar to mine I wouldn't expect anything that is not water sealed to last. However, your best option is to ask the printing company - they should know exactly what kind of canvas and ink they use and (if they're any good) how durable those materials are in diffrent conditions - they may even have special options for wet ...


1

There isn't a right or wrong answer for this. It really depends on the kind of finish you want. You probably don't want a glossy print, but just about any kind of luster, matte or canvas would probably work well.


1

If the picture is meant to be viewed as a whole, 6mp is enough for every size of the printout. The human eye does not have a better resolution if the viewer is far enough away to see the whole image. However, if you print e.g. a landscape and viewers are expected to look at small details by getting close to the picture, then a higher resolution is required. ...


1

I have a canvas print from mpix that has held up quite well for a year. While, it's not in a bathroom, it is in a room that doesn't get much AC during the hot, humid Washington DC Summers.


1

I don't have a first hand experience with their canvas prints, but BayPhoto did fine on my 20x16 foamcore mounted prints. Their prices seem to be in-line with comparative services and their customer service is very good as well. The submission of files is through a convenient Java applet (BayROES) that you download from their website and through which you ...


1

You can also print on self-adhesive vinyl, as the signage industry does. See this answer for more details


1

you can print on anything on which you can spread an emulsion. Paper is simply the most convenient. Do a quick search for "liquid light" to get you started. If you're asking about inkjet printing, I would think you'd need specialty printers and inks for different applications.


1

Canvas gives an "arty" feel to a photo, like someone took the time to make a very lifelike painting. Another printed medium is cake, for birthdays etc. People print on cake so they can eat it. :-P



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