Not Your Everyday Banana

by Bart Arondson

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0

There are two different situations. Bright ambient light: Turn on high speed sync on the flash. Lower the ISO Low ambient light: Select higher ISO until the shutter time is acceptable


0

Buy a lens assembly online for about $60 and have a go of replacing it yourself. My G11 lens has jammed up and I plan to do this. Or buy a brand new G16 which retails for under $500


3

This is the difference between CDAF (contrast detection) with integrated PDAF hybrid pixels vs full PDAF(phase detection). When using live view, the camera's imaging sensor is exposed and it tries to focus by using a combination of hunting for focus and checking the image contrast mixed with some hybrid pixels that contain limited phase detect focus ...


2

Yes, the Canon 430EX II is fully compatible with the Canon EOS 6D and should be able to do all of the functions for which it is designed. If you are having problems using your 430EX II with your EOS 6D, here are a few things you should check: Batteries Be sure the batteries for both the flash and the camera are properly charged. Connection Be sure the ...


7

Because of the 60Da's modification to increase IR sensitivity for astrophotography, if you plan on using the camera for regular visible-light photography, you probably should get an IR cut filter, otherwise you may experience color shifts when the sensor gathers both visible and non-visible light together (magenta cast with synthetic fabrics, and foliage ...


-1

I think you're getting confused between a feature of the camera and something you can modify - your camera has the feature you need. See this: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/explora/canon/announcements/canon-eos-60da-takes-a-astrophotography You probably don't need an IR (infrared) filter (take some shots first and find out, be sure to try it at night and ...


3

Is it wise? Well, probably the wise thing to do is to sell all of your electronics, camera gear included, and live a quiet life of mediation and peace. Or, is it a smart investment? Again, neither of these options is really the best. Better to sell it all and pick up a nice low-overhead index fund. But, photography is an art. Art is not wise (even if it ...


1

It probably isn't as big of a deal to switch as you think. It is fairly common when switching systems to sell off the old system and re-buy lenses in the new system. You do take a hit when off-loading the old lenses for the old system, but it still lets you get back up and running on the new system pretty quickly. It isn't trivial, but it also isn't too ...


0

Since you mentioned you're a student. I'll assume budget is a factor. With that in mind, have you considered cost of switching to Canon i.e. assume you sell off all your existing Sony gear at a fair price, will the proceeds be enough to buy equivalent lens for the type of photography you do. After all, the last thing you need is to switch and not be able to ...


1

Since you are totally a beginner I think you may consider buying yourself some books or just make a research for more information about basic photography just for a good start. After gaining some experience as a result of a solid foundation, you could upgrade and add some good lenses to your kid. I believe that you do not need another camera body or lenses, ...


4

If you're just starting out and asking basic gear questions, you should probably be most concerned with practice time and gaining basic technique and understanding of exposure and post-processing. :D The problem now may be your gear, but your biggest problem is lack of enough experience/knowledge to determine if your problem is the gear (and what gear, ...


3

Generally, you should upgrade / add equipment to address specific limitations with your current equipment. There is nothing particularly bad about your current kit, and without knowing what you want to do, it's hard to make specific recommendations. Do you have a good tripod and flash? If not, those will make a much bigger difference than a better camera or ...


-3

Save up and get a Full Frame Camera, Then start thinking about new lenses. The sharpest APS-C camera won't give images as sharp as a Full Frame camera. I just sold my Canon 7D and bought a 2nd hand 5D. The same cheap old "Nifty Fifty" lens is now MUCH sharper. Good glass can't beat a Larger sensor (under most circumstances)


1

ShutterCount for Mac. It is certified to work with the Canon 6D. https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/shuttercount/id720123827?mt=12 Dave


0

Olivier's answer is great, but I'd like to provide my shorter one: A rule of thumb is to never shoot handheld with shutter speed slower than 1/60th of a second. At night the shutter will almost certainly have to be slower than that so it is quite a bad idea to go handheld anyway. Use a tripod. There probably is no way for you to reprogram the AEB on your ...


0

Try giving the electrical contacts on both the lens and the body a gentle cleaning. If either side is dirty you may not be getting a proper connection.


2

Two main possibilities, the AF system in the camera for identifying proper focus may be shot or the AF motor in the lens may be shot. If you have more than one lens, switch lenses and see if you still have a problem. If multiple lenses can't focus, the problem is probably in your camera, possibly the AF sensor is not functioning. If only the one lens ...


2

I have owned the first 16-35 f2,8, the successor 16-35 f2.8 II and the 17-40 f4, and now the 16-35 f4. The new lens is much better in the corners and is really sharp overall. I sold the earlier wide angle zooms and even a 14mm f2.8 prime because the edges were unusable even stopped down. I had to crop frequently to eliminate the smeared parts. I finally ...


0

I cannot say anything official about hybrid AF working or not with non-STM lenses, but I have one clear experience with a third-party "Tamron SP 70-300 F/4-5.6 Di VC USD" lens, and this is awful: In phase detect AF mode the lens needs 1-2 seconds to focus, in Live-View mode on the EOS 650D it takes 2-4 seconds, which is plainly slow. Especially above 200mm ...


0

Adapters do exist to convert CR123 to 2CR5, but I haven't seen any actually for sale. It might not matter, though -- seems like you can get 2CR5 batteries for around $4 each, which is about the same as the price of a pair of CR2 or CR123 cells.


0

Are you looking at your close-up portraits and your group portraits at the same magnification? Or are you magnifying your group portraits more to judge focus? The higher your magnification, the more "grain" you'll see, because your pixels will be getting bigger and bigger. There is nothing wrong with your lens or camera, and I highly doubt a 6D is ...


1

You'll notice that after 10ft on the focus scale there is an 8 on its side. That's the symbol for infinity, the lens is designed to focus that far, if yours doesn't it may be damaged.


1

The optimum ISO is whatever ISO you need for the exposure you want. ISO adjustments on a digital camera simply boost the sensitivity of the sensor, either causing some forms of noise to be amplified as well or causing a reduction in dynamic range. If you were to under-expose an image and gain it up later, you still get the same noise amplification, but you ...


0

The manual probably tells you what the "base" ISO setting is. That will be the one with the least noise. On my camera, for example, that's ISO 200. However, the best way to learn what the tradeoffs are with various ISO settings for your camera is to take your own test shots. The base ISO will have the lowest noise, but that alone doesn't tell you enough ...


0

Generally speaking if you want the least amount of noise you typically want the base ISO which is likely around 160 on your camera. This is worth a debate(already done here) because underexposing an image can introduce noise so if you can properly expose at ISO 160 that will give you the most noise free image. If you want the "optimum" ISO it depends. ...


0

“A boat is a hole in the water, surrounded by wood or fiberglass, into which one pours money” It’s not hard to stretch this analogy to photography. It won’t be difficult to bump up against your price limit. I’ve been doing outdoor photography for just over five years and moved to a DSLR about two years ago, so I’m just a couple steps ahead of you. For ...


3

I would strongly recommend refraining from buying a different DSLR body if you already have one unless you have a specific reason, such as one of the following: Higher shutter speed Higher ISO options (better low light support) Switching sensor size (i.e. cropped sensor to full frame) Desire a new feature that is unavailable with your current body (like ...


2

I would suggest Canon Speedlite 320EX. It is relative cheap and matches price class of your camera body. It is also less powerful than 600EX, but in studio it does not matter so much. If you need powerful flash anyway, then Metz offers a wide choice for far less prices than Canon, but be advised that build quality is considerably lower as well.


2

This is called Photojojo lens mount, and you can find the product on this link.


1

Press the "Drive" button next to your camera's top display (between the AF and ISO buttons), and scroll through until you get the same icon as the 2 second timer but without the number 2 next to it. That's the 10 second timer. Here's the icon from the 60D user manual:



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