Spring 2012

Spring 2012
by ani

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1

Manufacturers are notorious for warning the owners of their products that using anything other than their own parts and accessories will cause the end of the known universe. This is not only true of camera makers, it is true of electronics manufacturers in general. It is true of automobile manufacturers. It is true of appliance manufacturers. It is true of ...


0

I have the Promaster Spectrum7 1.4x TC. Even at f5.6 plus the 1.4 TC my 7D tries to focus, sometimes it's successful, sometimes not, but often I get a soft image. I think because the Tokina 400mm F/5.6 is still recognized as that lens without the TC, and picks up on the MicroAdjustment setting I have set to correct the lens WITHOUT the TC. I'm assuming ...


2

In motorports photography a lot of images are panned captures. This is how the wheels get blurred and show motion. You can do this with a slower autofocus system such as the one you are using. Kevin's approach of focusing on a spot where a motorcycle will pass is very good advice. You can use manual focus or spot, whichever makes you feel more ...


5

In addition to Kevin's answer -- fast shutter speed, experiment with AF modes -- here are three more tips that will help you reach success: Use manual focus. The fastest autofocus systems are too slow for some uses or are fooled too easily for some uses. But manual focus lets you avoid those troubles! Prefocus where you know the motorcycle will be and as ...


2

I have not tried motorcycle events but have successfully photographed Ice Hockey matches with reasonable success so this advice is based on that. Set the camera to shutter priority (Tv) and start with a minimum of 1/250. You may can go faster if the light permits. The smaller the aperture you can get (while keeping the 1/250 min) the better to maximise the ...


0

I'm not sure that tethering is going to help, unless you are specifically manually focusing and just can't quite nail it. You can also try a better orientation of your subject to be more in line with the camera's sensor plane. Also, it looks like your camera has the ability to perform focus micro-adjustment for a given lens. You can try this by printing out ...


3

This and all similar questions are best answered by looking at websites designed for the purpose. One approach is to look at vendors like B&H Photo, which offers convenient filtering. For example, Canon EOS EF or EF-S lenses classified as "wide" or "wide zoom" with an aperture of f/1.4. Or, use a website dedicated to the task, like the Neocamera database....


1

I have tried using manual mode, Av mode, and Tv mode but no matter what; the minimum shutter speed is always 1/30 of a sec. I'll bet you're just misreading the display. The display on most (maybe all) Canon DSLRs reads 30 for 1/30s exposure, and 30'' for 30s. 30s is the longest shutter speed setting that many cameras (including the Canon 5DmkII) will ...


0

Don't know what you mean by your eyesight being "probably nearly perfect." Do you have the results of an actual eyetest? It's quite possible you've got a little myopia (near-sightedness). Next, the diopter adjustment may well be a bit off, especially if you're holding the camera even a bit closer or farther from your eye than the baseline calibration is ...


2

I'm guessing you actually are seeing best when it is set to the other end of the adjustment range: +1 diopter. Just as someone can have 20/20 distance vision and need reading glasses with a positive diopter to see things that are close, even if you have 20/20 or better distance vision your eyes may no longer be able to relax enough to focus on very near ...


2

It's all covered on pages 258-265 of your 700D Instruction Manual. You may use either the supplied standard A/V cable or an optional HDMI cable for high resolution playback. The only way to do it wirelessly would be to use an Eye-Fi card to transfer the images to another device (pp. 311-13 of the Instruction Manual) as they are shot and then play back the ...


2

I know this is an old question, but I just tried using an iPhone to record through my DSLR viewfinder and it seemed to work ok.


1

The issue is likely with Lightroom, which has seen significant slowdowns in import function. Adobe announced that v6.3/CC 2015.3 has been released to resolve these issues, by basically returning to its older import code.


4

No. It's not a mount issue—it's a glass issue. Sigma's mount conversion is to change between different mount systems so it will physically mount and electronically communicate to the system of your choice. Canon EF and EF-S lenses are actually still in the same mount/signaling system. And chances are good your 17-70/2.8-4 will actually mount and ...


0

You can probably prevent this problem by making sure your battery is fully charged. Stuck shutter (or probably, stuck mirror) is a common symptom of low battery, especially when taking a long exposure or using the flash. By the end of the exposure the battery doesn't have enough juice left to close the shutter and flip the mirror back. The other thing which ...


2

You could remove it altogether. Set the diopter wheel at the adjustment you desire. While holding the adjustment wheel to prevent moving it use a (correct size & type) screwdriver to remove the screw in the center of the wheel. Lift the wheel straight out of the housing. Replace the screw to close up the opening. If you don't want to do anything ...


1

Is there a way to permanently disable/fixate the diopter knob on pre-set value? I doubt it. The knob seems to be mechanical, and there's nothing like a "locked" setting. I don't think you'd want to remove it entirely because you'd have no way to fix it if it ever went out of adjustment, or if your eyes change. Perhaps the best solution is to arrange your ...


2

Can you put a small piece of gaffer's tape over it? Should be easy to cleanly remove when you want to. For some controls I've used a dab of hot glue, sometimes with a piece of teflon tape covering the knob surface itself. If you build up some glue against the teflon tape, then remove the tape, you can sometimes create a "semi-protected" state where it can ...


0

In addition to the metering issues well addressed in Itai's answer, there is also the design limitation of AI Servo compared to One Shot in the type of dim light that the IR AF Assist Beam is needed. When in AI Servo the pixels in the PDAF sensor array get a shorter "exposure" time than they do in One Shot. In very dim light the signal to noise ratio on the ...


3

CR123 is a Lithium battery with a nominal value of 3.7 volts. If you were to measure the voltage it would be between 3 and 4. Being a battery the voltage will change as the battery is used. (It can even change based on temperature, age and many other factors.) There are tons of different names and numbers for the same battery… DL123a, CR123, EL123, K123 ...


4

You actually have all the information you need. CR123A is what you need to buy. They happen to be 3V, and up to 1500mAh, lithium chemistry but not rechargeable. You should be able to find them in a camera shop, a chemist, or even a large supermarket, but it's easy and cheap to order them online. There is a rechargeable in the same shape, with a slightly ...


1

Live view mode uses contrast detection to achieve focus. This means that if you try and focus on an area with low contrast, it can have trouble focusing. You can either switch to manual focusing (and zoom the LCD view to help achieve sharp focus), or move the point to an area with good contrast (ie an area with a dark area next to a light area).


0

Do not take this wrong, but all the other modes are automatic. This one depends on you, so... learn how to control the camera. The situation you describe sounds to me that it is very dark, because you say that the camera focus for a moment and that is the only moment you see what are you photographing. That can be the focus asistant light. The rest of the ...


4

When you're in manual mode, you can shoot yourself in the foot all you want. This includes underexposing to the point of having a black frame. Check your meter. Unlike all the other automated modes, in M mode, the camera doesn't automatically adjust your settings to shove your meter's "needle" to 0. This is actually a feature, not a bug. But if you haven'...


4

I have tried changing the aperture and shutter speed but it didn't help. Not to state the obvious, but what you change the aperture and shutter speeds to matters a lot. What were the settings you used? Also, check the ISO and exposure compensation settings. A good way start is to take a photo in Program mode. If the exposure looks good, check the values ...


2

Both Nikon and Canon use ISO-compatible flash hotshoes on their cameras and feet on their flashes, so the Canon flash will fit on the Nikon hotshoe, its sync voltages are well within the limits a Nikon hotshoe can sustain, and the ground signal (rails) and sync (fire signal--the pin in the center of the foot's square) will be recognized and work, so the ...


0

The subject in your photo is moving and is NOT in focus ? but the exposure seems to be correct for his location. You could switch to manual focus mode, choose how the camera sets exposure or where in the scene you want to point the camera for setting the exposure, recompose and manually focus on the subject. The dynamic range of light is to wide for the ...


1

Contax/Yashica mount lenses can be adapted to Sony E-mount (not A-mount) and Panasonic/Olympus micro four-thirds and other mirrorless cameras, as well as Canon EOS-mount dSLRs. They cannot be adapted to Nikon F mount dSLRs with simple rings because of the flange distance issues, but you might be able to replace the mount with a Leitax kit; however the cost ...


9

From what I've read online, Err 30 is almost always a shutter failure, consistent with Canon's documentation for this specific error ("a malfunction with the shutter has been detected"). You should be able to get the camera fixed under warranty; if not, replacing the shutter would cost about $200 to $300—not worth it for a 1200D. While newer Canon EOS Rebel ...


1

The focus confirmation light indeed does NOT work in ai-servo mode. It would be cool if the focus confirmation dot acted like a missile target lock indicator, but it doesn't. It just tells you that the AF system has attained the best focus it can. In AF Servo mode it never reaches that point because the subject may move. How am I supposed to know if my ...


1

If your lenses are for a Canon EOS they should be EF mount and they should work on Canon EOS dSLRs.


25

It doesn't really matter whether shutter activations are in burst mode or not. What matters is that they happen. 500 shots per day for 150 days is 75,000 shutter activations! Canon no longer provides shutter ratings for the Rebel series but back when they did the oldest Rebels and later lower priced models had ratings of 50,000 activations while the later ...


5

The reason the focus confirmation light does not function in AI Servo mode is because the camera never stops tracking the subject and adjusting focus as necessary. The green focus confirmation light in the lower right corner of the viewfinder is an indicator that AF has been locked and has stopped measuring focus. That's the last thing you want to happen in ...


0

The camera is continuously focussing, so it doesn't really make sense to indicate which focus point is active. It would potentially be changing all the time, which could be distracting, or the camera could illuminate one focus point, the subject could move and the camera re-focusses using another focus point and the user might think that when they took the ...


4

Does this make the lens better than an L Lens? It all depends on what way you mean when you use the word "better": Sharper at common apertures and focal lengths? At the center of the frame or over the entire field of view? Less chromatic aberration at a particular focal length and aperture? Less light falloff at a particular focal length and aperture? ...


2

This is a problem I have come across and solved using other usb devices to connect to a virtualbox VM. So hopefully this will solve your problem. The solution is to set the number of CPUs in the virtual machine to only 1. You do this from the Virtual Box Settings for the virtual machine. Power down the Virtual Machine. Then in its settings select 'system' ...


2

No, you can't. The ST-E2 is like a headless 550EX--it doesn't grok/speak the commands from the camera menu. You'd need a 580EXII or later hotshoe unit as master to have that kind of control. If you don't have the cash to spring for the RT flash system or you want a small optical master, your best bet is probably to ditch the ST-E2, and get a 90EX instead. ...


1

The Cobra Auto 210 is reported to have a very high flash trigger voltage. As you can see from Can using an old flash damage a new DSLR?, this is not safe. Earlier Canon DSLRs could only handle 6V — yours should be able to handle up to 250V, but it's possible the Cobra flash exceeded that. (Also, there is some lack of clarity on whether 250V is okay through ...


2

Try to look at the histogram of the pictures. Is it unbalanced to the left? If so, you may be tricked by the preview screen. Also, could it be due to the screen you are using, which has poor contrast or low backlighting? Note that, typically, laptop screens don't have much contrast unless you set the backlight high or if exposed to sunlight.


1

The answer will vary from lens to lens, and probably on other factors as well, such as whether the image stabilizer is in the center. :-) The biggest problem with Canon's EF-S design has nothing to do with the image circle and everything to do with the short backfocus. Because the back of the lens sticks farther into the camera with EF, moving from a 1.6x ...


1

I'm looking for my first DSLR and I want it to be sharp (I mean, 5DsR is really sharp but it has low dynamic range), has high dynamic range (like the D810) and has low iso noise. This contradicts following: Canon is the one and only brand I can consider, mostly because they lenses feels much more solid in the hand and they have nice wide-angle lenses. ...


1

I wouldn't exclude Nikon. I have a D750 and a 20mm 1.8 prime lens and I absolutely love it. You could also consider something like the A7 Mark II. It's what a lot of people are going for nowadays.


2

Based on the note on page 74 of the PowerShot SX530 HS User Guide and absent of any instructions as to how to disable it, I would say there is no way to disable this using the official Canon firmware.


1

You've already got the portrait lens you need: The 50mm f/1.8. On your APS-C camera it provides an angle of view the same as if you were using an 80mm lens on a full frame body. That angle of view also means you would be shooting at the same distances and getting the same perspective to get the same framing as if you were using an 80mm lens on a full frame ...


2

The use case that will reveal the most separation between the two is with longer focal length lenses that have wide apertures. The 70D includes the option to calibrate the camera to individual lenses via Auto Focus Micro Adjustment (AFMA), the 760D/Rebel T6s does not. AFMA allows the end user to adjust for the differences in manufacturing tolerances between ...


20

What is this red dot next to the viewfinder and live view button on the Canon EOS Rebel T6 (1300D)? A red dot is a common symbol for the record function, and as on other EOS bodies that button serves the dual purpose of starting Live View mode and starting and stopping movie recording. The icon on the button itself is the Live View icon, and I think the ...


3

Canon will almost certainly always have a version of Digital Photo Professional to include with their cameras. Apple may not always support Aperture. (Yeah, I know. Hindsight's always 20/20)



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