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3

No sadly it isn't. I had a 40D and sold it when I upgraded it to the 60D. Strange how it still doesn't feel like an upgrade lol :)


0

Yes, it will work, however their are some big caveates that probably make it not worth it. It will be an f/11 lens at the full 800mm focal length as a result of losing two stops of speed from the teleconverter. This means PDAF will be unable to function and you will need to focus manually or use live view and contrast based AF. Additionally, you will be ...


2

The camera will not take a picture if the lens does not have focus lock. When you put it in manual focus, the camera will take photos whether there is focus lock or not. In live mode the camera will take a photo even if not in focus, because autofocus does not operate in live view mode, since the autofocus detector is no longer in the light path. This is ...


-1

Can you change the aperture of the lens? If no please check the status of contacts on camera body. But in both cases the preferred solution is to contact Canon repair center


1

The four-thirds Olympus/Panasonic "RC" wireless system is completely incompatible with Canon's wireless eTTL. Them's just the breaks. The hotshoe communication protocols that are used to perform TTL, HSS, and wireless firing are all proprietary and brand-specific, just like lens/body electronic communication is. (Well, except in the case of micro ...


1

There are several methods you can use to fire the 430EX remotely, and while most require additional equipment, not all of them do. Canon wireless e-TTL (IR) Canon has two built-in wireless systems for remotely firing flashes with its cameras: a radio system and an infrared system. None of your units speak the radio system, but the 430EX can be used as a ...


0

I'm using radiopopper nano transmitter and receiver to fire my 430Exll from 6D.


0

The Canon camera won't be faster or easier to use unless it feels more natural to you. The only way you are going to figure that out is if you go to a store and try them both. As for the lenses, don't compare based on lenses. Both of the 50mm primes are good and both of the other lenses are not very good. The newest version of the 18-55mm kit lens isn't ...


-1

Non of the zoom lens is good. You will get average IQ with both of them. Talking about the bodies IMHO 70D is better than D5300. Both 50 mm lens are average the same. And Canon is easy for use, just need to read the documentation :) P.S. Also please check this: Is there any significant difference between Nikon and Canon?


0

You can simulate multiple exposures in post-processing. The custom setting you found is not for taking brackets of shots, it's simply for setting whether you want 1/2 stops or 1/3 stops as the units for partial-stop settings on the camera. And yes, the 600D can perform autobracketing. You cannot, however, change the number of shots you can get in a set ...


1

If you are on a really tight budget, you can download and print a pattern to make a hood for your lens out of stiff paper or cardboard. This site has patterns for many popular lenses.


2

In addition to Philip Kendall's answer, the document you've found advising that the Canon 600D can't take multiple exposures, is referring to the ability to shoot more than one exposure and combine them in camera to produce a single image. For info on that technique see this question How can multiple exposure be achieved with a digital camera? and ...


6

Yes, it can - the option you're after is "auto exposure bracketing" (AEB), which can most easily be configured from the quick menu - select the meter (the -3 to +3 scale), press "SET", then turn the control wheel. At this point, the little indicator marker should split into three, which will mean that the next three shots the camera takes will have normal ...


0

Unfortunately this isn't available on the 5D Mark ii, atleast not without third party hacks. It is a feature they made available on the mark iii with an option in the settings to limit the minimum automatic shutter speed as well as the minimum and maximum automatic ISO settings. I heard some mention that it might be possible with Magic Lantern, but it isn't ...


3

I don't know why you think you get more natural colours in Av mode. Back in the film days, people would underexpose for that purpose, but as long as you don't overexpose, colours will be fine. If you have a preference for shutter speed, then Tv mode is just for you. If you want to get underexposed pictures (for whatever reason), then there is exposure ...


1

If your lens is the Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM, the official lens hood is specified as ET-65B on the Canon website. If you search "ET-65B hood" on Google or eBay et al, you'll get lots of options to purchase an official Canon one or a third-party imitation.


0

Just check Canon's website for the appropriate hood for that lens. Then you can check any camera store or ebay for the genuine article or a cheaper third party knock off.


2

The EOS utility can only adjust the focus on your camera when the lens is set to AF (as it needs to use the motors in the lens to move the elements). If your lens is set to AF you should be able to adjust the focus in EOS Utility using this area: Note the arrow buttons in particular, these can be used for adjusting the focus remotely by eye However, as ...


0

As for which lens to use on which body, I do think you are over-thinking it. Both cameras are full frame cameras, and all your lenses are L series lenses. So, with any matchup, you have L lenses on full-frame bodies. As for which camera/lens combination to use where, I suggest you use the body that performs best in low light for indoor shots. All the lenses ...


0

I had the same exact problem. I use a 70D, and it was focusing way too far front, ruining my shoots. I was about to take it apart and solder the points, when I realized that the camera has an AF microadjustment feature. It was focusing too far forward, so I set it to +17 (out of 20) and now the lens is sharp as a tack. Definitely try this first if your ...


4

You need to keep the button half pressed. The setting is not locked when you push half way. If you let go, the system believes you decided not to take the photo or the lock was no good (maybe it focused on the wrong thing). When you release the button, the settings are also released. You need to press half way and keep the button half pressed after the ...


0

I am not aware of any formal name for it. I don't believe it is any standard, just something Canon's engineers cooked up. Your best bet is probably to packet monitor the traffic.


0

You can do few things: - shoot in manual mode, this will help you avoid metering lag - try (if its possible) to assign AutoExposure Lock to some of the buttons on the camera and premeasure the exposure, lock and shoot - shoot in manual focus mode to avoid lag from focusing - try (if its possible) to assign AutoFocus Lock to some of the buttons on the camera ...


1

A number of Leica lenses have a "focusing tab" on them, it lets an experienced user know the focus distance setting by feel - and gives the finger something to hold on to for adjusting the focus as well. Could it be something along those lines? Granted, it wouldn't be as useful on an SLR as on a rangefinder...


-4

It is used to control the aperture settings of your camera.


1

As far as I'm aware the contents of the Quick Control Screen can't be customised. I assume by colour trim you mean the WB SHIFT/BKT menu option? The Quick Control Screen will show a WM +/- icon when this is option is adjusted away from 0, but you can't access the setting from that screen. If you need convenient access to this setting, I think think the ...


1

Yes. I looked it up to be sure. To be clear, EF lenses fit on a camera that uses EF-S. EF-S sticks farther into the camera. Look for the white alignment mark to tell if they will physically mount on your camera.


1

One likely possibility is that the adapter ring you're using doesn't have a pin to hold the DoF preview lever on the lens in place, so that the lens actually stops down, and despite setting the aperture with the lens's aperture ring, you're still shooting wide open. You may need to hold the DoF preview button down while you take the shot to get the aperture ...


0

As far as I can remember, once you open CameraWindow on your iPad, and you have a connection to your camera, you can see the thumbnails which you can individually select by tapping them and then tap the save button. Perhaps this wikihow article might help


0

I had this happen on my Canon G12. From reading, many sites say it's from sand getting in the lens or dropping the camera. Neither happened to mine and I still got the lens error. I wound up getting it repaired through this site: http://www.camerasandparts.com They only work on the Canons and no other brands. For $89 they repaired it and covered both ...


1

There are two versions of the Canon FD lens mount. Both versions will work on your camera, but they attach and lock differently. With the original FD mount (which this lens may be), there is a ring at the back of the lens, behind the aperture ring, that needs to be turned in order to lock the lens onto the camera body. With the "New FD" or "FDn" mount (well, ...


3

My immediate thought is damaged sensor, but if hitting it helps, it is also possible a connection is loose or corroded and the bump makes the connection good again for a second. You might try taking the camera apart and reseat any connectors you can get your hands on. If that doesn't work, you could try to identify bad connections and reflow solder where ...



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