Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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0

The focal length is the actual focal length of the lens, but since you have a very small sensor, it is highly cropped compared to what you would get with a 35mm lens. Since the crop factor is 4.8, it is equivalent to a 29.28mm-146.4mm lens. The aperture is the range of maximum apertures, 1.8 on the wide end and 2.8 on the tight end. Again, crop factor ...


0

Just a side note: slowness during making night shots may be due to noise reduction... The data transfer speed is easy to calculate. Take a picture of your choice (e.g. RAW with 12-bit, uncompressed - just an example), and see the file size of that. (Or average the sizes of the pictures you have made - or find the worst case size.) Now, when you make ...


1

Focal length A 50 mm focal length is considered as 'normal' for a full frame camera, i.e. with a sensor that is 24 x 36mm. With a smaller sensor the focal length for a 'normal' lens is shorter. The G15 has a 7.6 x 5.7mm sensor, so a 'normal' lens would be 11mm. The 6.1-30.5mm lens has the same field of view as a 28-140mm lens would have on a camera with a ...


6

6.1-30.5mm is the actual focal length (zoom) range for the lens, but the sensor in the camera is much smaller than that in a dSLR or film camera, so the focal lengths are also smaller. The G15 uses a 1/1.7" format sensor, so its crop factor is roughly 4.5x. The spec to look for here, if you know how focal lengths translate to field of view (FOV) on film is ...


1

If an adapter existed, on EF/EF-S, the lens would sit farther in front of the camera body than it's designed to, and this would be like using macro extension tubes: you'd lose the ability to focus to infinity with the lens, and it would only be good for photographing close subjects. Which is why such an adapter doesn't exist.


0

You can use CHDK or Cannon Hack Development Kit. I am using it on my SX50. You can get clear instructions on my blog You can also check out my photos on Flickr


1

You cannot mount an EF-M Lens on a standard DSLR or at least it won't work the way you want it to. The EF-M lenses are designed to sit closer to the sensor than on a DLSR. There is no way to get the EF-M lens closer to a DSLR sensor because the mirror is in the way. You can however, put a DSLR lens on the EOS-M camera with what is essentially a spacer to ...


0

I've made an OS X app called EOS Inspector that reads shutter actuations count: http://eosinspectorapp.com


-1

I had same problem try this way: connect the camera to computer with the usb cable and then turn the camera on. It worked for me, the computer will install the driver for you


1

I Googled online for an answer and also asked some people at the local camera store if they had any idea. I came to know that Canon has two 2x FD extenders FD 2X-A and FD 2X-B. Apparently FD 2X-A are for lenses 300mm or higher and FD 2X-B are for lenses below 300mm. So, I took a risk and bought a FD 2X-A extender from eBay and I was able to attach the ...


0

There can be issues with the Sensor when recording video for a long stretch of time. The Sensor being exposed for that long can cause damage from overheating. In regards to it damaging the SD card, it could depend on the configuration of the card you're using. What brand is the card and read/write speed is the card?


0

If you have taken these photos and have them in the raw format, there are a few things you can do. In lightroom/photoshop apply noise remover. It will make a difference. Don't over do it, as it will actually make people look plastic. Convert them to black and white, and play with colour correction and noice removal until clean. if you are not sure of ...


1

There are several online depth-of-field (DOF) calculators that you can use to gain some understanding and have some initial idea. E.g. see this.


0

Start by trying with as low of an aperture number as possible. If the depth of field is too shallow (can't get subject completely in focus), then try increasing it, but there is far more to getting the background blurry and the subject clear. You also want to use the longest focal length you can, be as close to the subject as you can and have the ...


2

There's not enough information here to answer, because we're missing several important things. First, does your film SLR have metering? If so, is it "through the lens metering"? If it is a recent camera (1980s or after), the answer is almost certainly "yes", which makes the answer to your question "just do what the camera's meter tells you". The next bit ...


1

This malfunction can be caused by a variety of component failures, so it is impossible to know for sure without opening up the lens. You can try cleaning the electrical contacts, but it is also possible that there is an electronic or mechanical fault with an internal component. For example, there could be a problem with the circuit board. Or there could ...


3

Let me start by saying there isn't a wrong answer. Either camera you suggested is a HUGE improvement over an entry level model and you are jumping pretty much clean over the mid-range models. I personally jumped from an xTi (400D) to a 5D Mark iii, but I made that large of a jump because I was starting commercial photography work on the side. I know you ...


3

You say the 550D is happily serving all your needs and that you're only looking to upgrade because "it is time". May I suggest keep your 550D. It's a great camera by all means and you're already enjoying it. You can put the money you were going to spend on the camera (both that you mention would set you back more than a thousand pounds) and instead invest ...


0

I would wait till may-june to see how Canon 7D Mark II will look like. Craig from CanonRumors rate it as CR2 which means that this is a trusty source. Anyway, rumors about 7Dmk2 are floating around from some time now, hence it should appear sooner than latter. A 7D2, even if it will be outside of your price range, will lower the prices for the other ...


0

I suppose it really does come down to your needs and how you plan on using your camera and for what purposes. I would personally go for the 7D as it saves on upgrading the lens etc like you mentioned. I suppose if your on a budget then get the 7D you miss out on image quality but it does serve its purpose for what you NEED.


0

"ISO" doesn't ruin anything, noise may. "ISO" is just a nomer for the sensitivity settings of your sensor, and an acronym for the International Standards Organisation. Higher sensitivity settings tend to create more noisy images than those taken at lower settings with the same sensor and under the same conditions but that's as far as it goes. No shot is ...


1

Do you really have to assign blame? Those are the photos you have. You can delete them and forget the fiasco entirely or keep them as a reminder of one or more of the following: High ISO image-noise. Poor performance of the camera at high ISO. Inadequate choice by the photographer to increase ISO instead of something else such as a brighter aperture or ...


0

They look OK on my (calibrated) monitor. Some are a bit noisy (especially the larger-group ones with dark areas in the photo) but certainly not ruined. Such issues as there are probably aren't easily fixable on a JPEG file unfortunately.


2

I would agree they are not bad... They are some things in post that she could do to take them to the next level but before you do anything you need to calibrate all of your monitors. In post for example there are quite a few pictures that I would adjust the brightness (increase) and saturation (lower) of the red, yellow, and orange channels. As far as grain ...


5

These are not bad IMO. The color is a bit over saturated and dark, but I didn't see any objectionable grain on my calibrated display. Remember, if they print these, the effective resolution may not be the same as viewing them full screen on a large display, so what you see in a blown up image may be invisible in the print. If, at the print size, you don't ...


1

it looks to me like you shot direct to jpeg and has high iso NR on, or applied some NR in post and stored in jpeg with too much compression on. Yes, it is caused by noise on the dark areas (black suits look the worst, but you could have avoided the funny texture if you shot raw and didnt do NR and stores in high quality jpegs (80-100%). it would look noisy ...


1

I use the Yongnou 622's with my 7D and I have found they work quite well. I haven't pushed the range, so I cannot comment on how well they work at long distances. The advantage of these triggers, is full TTL and support for groups and hypersync. This also gives you control of the flash output from the camera, which is great if the flashes are spread ...


1

Well, There are many full on reviews of flash trigger systems on the internet, my experience differed with their conclusions. The most popular systems out there are PocketWizards. they are also the most expensive, and I heard the company is not doing well financially. So my choice went to Phottix and their Odin system, but... I have just sold this system ...


0

Overexposed and underexposed photos are results of not exposing your scenes correctly. When you use high or low shutter speeds, you have to change the aperture and ISO, as well! If you raise up the shutter speed, means that less light will enter the sensor, so you have to change the aperture or the ISO or both of them. An aperture of f8 lets less light to ...


1

I would recommend the 5d mark III without a doubt. Yes it's more, but the mark II has an antiquated AF system with a 9-point diamond. It's fine for most things but if you want to track objects such as aircraft, sports players, etc. the 61-pt AF system in the mark III is much better. Zone mode, expansion mode, spot too, all help get that shot! Also the ...


1

The resolution difference is so small that it is irrelevant. Technological improvements on the other hand deliver a much better performance from the Mark III version with almost 2 full stops of improvements in terms of image-noise at high-ISO. In terms of photography though, the most significant difference between the two is that the Mark III has a 100% ...


6

The 5D mk2 was released in 2008, the mk3 in 2012, 4 years is a long time in technology. The mk3 is much better, it is better because of 4 years of sensor technology research, the pixel size makes a difference only if everything else is the same - and when you compare a models that have a 4 years difference everything isn't even close to the same. If you ...


1

You can also skip the external intervalometer altogether and try Magic Lantern. It supports exposure bracketing by the shutter or ISO. It would be in camera and free.


1

Shutter speed is one of the things that control aspects of your image, primarily in your case it is effecting how much light is let into the lens. In manual mode you have to adjust all of your settings yourself as manual implies. So when you are using these shutter speeds you are not compensating for the other settings and that is why. Experiment with ...


4

With a ideal 2x teleconverter, you will be 2 f-stops down from what the lens is set to. Think about the basic physics and this should be clear. A 2x teleconverter makes the dimension of anything in the image 2x larger. Something that would result in a 1x1 mm square with the bare lens results in a 2x2 mm square with the teleconverter. That 2x2 mm square ...


0

think yes but you will have several disadvantage that are mainly: very low light will reach the sensor (2x extender already "remove" several LUX) only manula focus and settings (speed) aperture could be unavailable if there is no settings on the lens itself (normaly there is one on old lens) no special coating on last lens of the group, so some ghost ...


2

The effective maximum aperture will be F/3.6. You can stop down from there to F/22 which will be equivalent to F/44. The camera will get the same amount of light as F/3.6 to autofocus since that is done wide-open.


0

CamRanger is a good system, although pricey it also does quite a bit more that you may find useful. Here's some information


2

There are a lot of options on Amazon, like this one. The basic idea is you put the camera in bulb mode and use the intervalometer to control the shutter. Some may have AEB settings, or you can adjust it yourself.


2

When taking a photograph, the image isn't created immediately, but over time. A higher shutter speed provides less exposure to the light, and thus the resulting image will be darker than a slower shutter speed that allows greater exposure, if all settings are the same. This can be compensated by making your camera more sensitive to light (raising your ISO, ...


17

It sounds like you don't understand exposure. If you change to an all manual mode, then its expecting you to adjust shutter speed, aperture, and ISO all in concert - 'manually'. If you set a faster shutter speed, you'll need to raise your ISO or open your aperture more to adjust for the fact that you're letting in less light. The same with a lower shutter ...


7

Yes, you can change the relationship of the shift mechanism to the mount flange so that you can apply shift vertically when shooting in the portrait orientation. This is pretty much a design feature with most tilt/shift lenses designed for use on SLR type cameras. Where your lens, along with the TS-E 17mm f/4 L, expands the capability of other T/S lenses is ...


0

The differences are - roughly in this order: Light Posing and mimic Lens (as for the brilliance) The model Editing/Finishing Fashion Background This list is probably not complete. :-) So there is a whole bunch of skills plus some equipment, that an excellent photographer needs to master.


5

Others have already pointed out lighting and some things to do in post processing. Those are important and the primary issue here, but I want to point out something else, which is framing. Think of the whole frame, and how your subject relates to the whole frame. And always remember that you can rotate the camera. Every picture, ask yourself whether what ...


1

It is both the lighting and the lens. The picture you are taking is has a background brighter than the subject and that will always make the subject look subdued. You can compensate for this either by altering the position of the subject so that the lighting is better or using a powerful enough Speedlight to act as a fill. Additionally, the first photo is ...


2

Right off the bat I can see that there's a difference in the direction of light. Your model is in shadow while the man is being lit from the side. You have soft lighting which is usually preferred for women and the old man has a harsher light which can emphasize the oldness of his age (typically not desirable for women). The old man is probably ...


4

Mainly things are different, here's a few big ones: Lighting is a big one. Your picture has even, flat lighting. The other picture has strong directional lighting which adds texture to the face. You probably would not want to shoot your girlfriend with that kind of lighting. Sharpness - both in lens and probably post processing. The other picture is ...


4

You may use as follow: 40mm STM(pan cake). for night street photography EF 50mm f/1.8. for Day street photography



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