Serene Life

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1

With a tested Minimum Focus Distance (MFD) of 16.81 inches at 270mm and a Maximum Magnification (MM) of 0.26x, or approximately 1:4, you can't really do Macro photography with that lens. And since it is already slow at f/6.3 at 270mm, the minimal gain you would get in terms of MM by adding extension tubes would make the lens too dark to be very useful.


1

There probably won't be a macro facility to 'activate' - the 'Macro' designation just means the lens can focus very close to your subject. If you are using the lens at the closest range available on the focusing scale (probably using the longer end of the zoom range at the same time) then you can safely claim to be practising macro photography. There is no ...


1

That is the result of the raw processing program not having the correct profile for the said camera. Getting an updated version should resolve your problem. The list of cameras supported by RawTherapee, together with the version number since, can be found at RawPedia.


1

Maybe your reverse motor is stuck in the helix / bent plastic path. You need to push it to adjust. http://www.fotomozaic.ro/artikel.php?idstory=225&s=1 The motor has weak, broken gears.


1

RawTherapee supports Canon PowerShot G16 starting RawTherapee version 4.2.


2

The batteries are interchangeable among certain groups of cameras. You need to look at the battery's "E" number and figure out which "group of cameras" it can fit into. Below are some battery types and the cameras they fit into (not an exhaustive list) LP-E8 - EOS 550D, 600D, 700D, T2i, T3i, T4i,T5i LP-E5 - EOS Rebel XS, Rebel T1i, Rebel XSi, 1000D, ...


0

I have recently used this lens and having a copy of the old lens, I could instantly see the difference in quality. The images are sharper towards the edges (way Sharper). I tested in backlit situations, and the purple fringing is way way reduced compare to the older model. The copy of the lens that I have, produced a slightly colder tint compared to the ...


5

Any EF lens can be used on one of Canon's full-frame cameras. Generally, when Canon makes a newer version of a lens, it's because there can either be improvements to the optical design, or they can make a cheaper version of the lens. With Ls, it's usually the former. The Mk I version of the 14L came out in 1991. The Mk II version in 2007, so you ...


4

First off, all EF lenses (L or otherwise) can be mounted on a Canon 5D. Nothing about the L precludes it from being mounted on other bodies, nor only the higher end bodies being restricted to only L lenses. The difference between the two (and I'm working from Ken Rockwell's review at Canon 14mm f/2.8 L II) Heavier (4oz heavier than the original) Built in ...


-4

I think you should buy a graduated ND filter, use a longer exposure, and try again, with a tripod of course.


0

Two things need to happen in order to get a good "long exposure" photograph. Extended shutter Steady camera The shutter speed you used works for this scene, but the camera isn't steady enough. To eliminate the movement your body imparts on the camera, use a tripod, or set the camera down on a wall or other stable surface. It is also good practice to ...


2

To add to the other more technical points, I'd suggest changing the composition slightly. At the moment you have a lot of 'just' water in the bottom right. Moving the fountain down and right in the image would show more of the river (lake?) disappearing into the distance. As a general rule of thumb, putting the main subject of an image in the centre of the ...


2

Wait until the light is more favorable. This would probably be a time when the sky is not overcast and the sun is behind you, such as in the hour after sunrise or the hour before sunset. With proper exposure, this will allow the sky to appear blue instead of white.


2

"What to improve" is a very subjective question. with that in mind: one of my main dislikes about this exposure is the "burned" sky due to the long exposure. As your sky is somewhat similar in color to the fountain water, it reduces the emphasis from it. As you are probably using a tripod, I would attempt to capture a HDR (high dynamic range) image to get ...


0

You didn't say which half is black. If it's the bottom portion of the screen, and you are using flash, your shutter speed may be faster than the max sync speed of your camera, which is about 1/250 sec.


3

In general, all camera brands have their own proprietary system for connecting lenses. Modern mounts are all bayonet style, which means they twist and lock rather than needing to screw on, as older lenses did. These mounts are not interchangeable, so you'll need a lens that matches your camera bodies. Most brands have different sub-variants of their mount, ...


3

The lens you've linked to is the Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II. It will not fit your camera, because it is a Canon EOS lens: neither the physical linkage nor the electronic contacts match those on your camera. What you're looking for is a Nikon F-mount lens. The easiest way to ensure you've got an F-mount lens is to buy a new lens that's Nikon-branded that is for ...


1

In general, you want to look at the lens mount. Cameras and lenses both use some standard of connector to ensure compatibility. In general, if a lens uses the same mount, it should be basically compatible, though some features may not work. For example, third party lenses may not support automatic adjustments on newer cameras without updates. Similarly, ...


1

The only "real" RAW option is the option RAW. The other two, S-RAW and M-RAW where introduced in the EOS-1D Mark III and EOS-1D Mark IV respectively as options to decrease the file size. The S-RAW has about 1/4th the number of pixels and half the fil size of "real" RAW and the M-RAW about 54-60 % of the pixels and two thirds of the size of the RAW option. ...


0

It depends on your style of shooting weddings. If you tend to take a lot of candids or use a photojournalism style, I think a 24mm would be useful. However, I wouldn't advise buying the Canon 24/1.4 straight off. Used Canon 24/2.8 are pretty cheap, and Sigma 24/1.8 won't hurt your pocketbook too hard. If you're in love with Canon's 24/1.4, try renting one ...


2

No, you don't want such a wide lens for a wedding, at least not for much. I shoot weddings using my 24-70 f/2.8 and my 70-200 f/2.8. During the ceremony, my 70-200 gets the most use with the 24-70 being used for a few shots to capture the entire room. You are constantly shooting from a distance both for the perspective it gives and also because you don't ...


0

A polyvalent zoom(50~200mm), something with a pretty high zoom if you want to take some portraits because like dpollitt said : an extremely wide angle lens for portraits, sure you can use it some for a wedding, but you would be silly to use it for most of the day - as you'll get tons of distortion. But why a polyvalent zoom because at a low zoom (~50mm) ...


0

In the camera specs, the one you're looking for is the slowest shutter speed. For the SX 160 IS, this is 15s. For the Minolta 404 si Dynax, it's 30s. Most compact fixed-lens digital cameras will max out somewhere shorter than 30s. What you really want, if you have to make a five-minute exposure, is bulb mode, which allows you to keep the camera shutter ...


1

It does not matter what you set in camera as RAW. RAW is RAW, it is not modified until post. Most monitors will not display aRGB and many printers do not print aRGB. I select aRGB as the assigned profile and my printer tells me much is out of gamut. I am forced to work in sRGB as that is where my color gamut is for my monitor and printer.


2

According to the Manual: No. The longest shutter time is 15s, even in Manual Mode. No mention of a Bulb mode. Your best shot at achieving functionality is by trying out the CHDK alternative firmware, which allows an override of the Shutter Speed values, letting you select how long you want. It seems the CHDK is available for the SX160 IS (cf. here). Try at ...


0

As so often with Canon DSLRs, the Magic Lantern alternate firmware provides this feature.


1

No, this isn't a huge deal. Aside from the 1x00D series, other Canon camera models that did not have the sensor-shake/cleaning feature include: 1Ds, 1DsMkII, 1D, 1DMkII, 5D (classic), 10D, 20D, 30D, 300D (Rebel), and 350D (XT). I shot with the 350D (it was my first dSLR) for four years, I changed lenses like a mad thing, often forgetting (gasp! horror!) to ...


1

It may be possible to get most of this effect in-camera without special equipment, it shouldn't be to difficult to try - here's my attempt at deconstructing the images: Shoot raw, we are playing with lighting and it will help if we are able to fix things in post. The pictures are outside in the sunlight, try mid morning or late afternoon, it's not golden ...


1

Two ways to do it (in Photoshop) are to: Duplicate the layer of the image you want to lighten Go to Image>>Adjustment>>Exposure. Adjust to the lightness you want... THEN duplicate that layer (Note: you know have 3 layers) Go to >>Filters>>Blur>>Gaussian Blur Adjust the Gaussian Blur to a number like say "6" Really blow it out. Hit "OK" ...


0

Some ways to achieve this kind of effect are as follows: 1) Over exposing the image slightly (tripod required) 2) Post processing using software like Photoshop Personally I would want to never overexpose an image unless shooting astrophotography as you lose the data in the raw image. This makes post production very difficult as it limits your options. ...


0

This is kind of a hard head-to-head comparison, but basically, the EF-S 17-85 was an upgrade over the contemporaneous 18-55 kit lenses of its day (2004)--the non-USM, non-IS first version. The IS STM version of the 18-55 kit lens, however, is something like the eighth version of that lens, introduced in 2013, so it's a spanking new design, and probably ...


0

The official specification from the Canon website says it supports SD and SDHC cards. Not SDxc, though (which use the exFAT file system instead of FAT32 on SDHC). So as long as you stick to an SDHC card, you can use a 32GB card without any problem. The card class is only the "guaranteed supported speed" that the card supports, in reading and writing. You ...


0

If you have a problem with several lenses, and the camera is still under warranty, I'd get the sample pictures on an SD card (also adding pics of a neutral grey/whitish wall at varying apertures for reference) to take with you to the shop, and get it serviced there.


0

For landscapes, you probably don't want a telephoto. The 18-55 isn't necessarily the best lens out there for what you want to do, but of the three you have listed, it is the only one that is not a lens going from telephoto all the way in to super telephoto territory and thus probably the only one of the 3 that would really be ideal for landscape. It is the ...


4

The one device that you could buy which would give you a greater focal length with your current lens is a teleconverter - Canon produce both a 1.4x version, which increases the focal length of your lenses by 1.4x, and a 2x version which doubles the focal length. However, note that both come with a drawback - they reduce the effective aperture of your lens, ...


0

You can nearly deduce the physical max. shutter speed from the x-sync time of the camera. But for most cases in which the shutter speed is really relevant, this information is not relevant. Practially most bodies achieve much shorter exposure times (not shutter speeds to be accurate) by releasing the 2nd curtain of the shutter well before the 1st has ...


5

No, there's no way to deduce the max shutter speed. It's typically listed in the same specs where you'd find the kind of information you've listed, in fact.


2

The manual for the mecablitz 44 AF-1 notes (on page 101) that on some cameras, the AF assist ("measuring beam", they call it) will only work if the camera's center AF point is used, and won't with others. That might be your problem. The newer mecablitz 44 AF-3C, mentions a similar limitation (page 48), and also notes that on some cameras, the AF beam is ...



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