Lightnings taking a ride

by ceinmart

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20

That appearance is very typical for a hair sitting on the sensor. Fortunately they are also very easy to get rid of. Either go to a camera store or do it yourself. Detach the lens in a dry and particle free (as particle free as possible) and lock the mirror up while opening up the shutter. This can often be done easily in a sensor cleaning mode from the ...


5

That is intentional. As described here: This new STM lens is an inch shorter and adds a zoom lock and instant manual-focus override to the older 18-135mm EF-S IS lens, however manual focus is electronic. The focus ring isn't connected to anything, and there is a tiny time delay between when you move the ring and the lens moving. The speed at which the ...


5

The three pictures you have included are all the same type connector, a female PC sync connector. A male PC to male PC cord will connect to any of them.


5

Can you use it? Of course... no one would stop you, but if you mean what results you'd get, odds are the film will be darkened along its edges by light leakage, and there may have been some chemical reaction with the air. If it is monochrome film, though, and the camera was not subjected to high temperatures (over 25 C) or high humidity, the film may work ...


4

Why do you think they're different? They all look like female PC sync ports and they'll fit the same PC connector. There really is only one "kind" of PC sync port; there's even an ISO standard for it: ISO 519. The only possible difference is whether it's "screwlock" (i.e., has threads on the outer-most side to secure the connector) or simply ...


4

I believe that the "obvious" change here should not be underestimated. After my recent switch from APS-C (Canon) to full frame (Nikon) even with the brand change and the different user interface my biggest challenge are implications of DOF and the fact that because of that the focusing needs to be much more exact.


4

It sounds like your control wheel is "locked" - press the button underneath it called "unlock" This should now let you control the aperture.


4

The Canon 18-135mm STM lens allows for Manual override when set to AF Mode. It will not harm the lens or the camera. It is a feature that is commonly used by Videographers but also by some photographers, A common example will be at a wedding. Here you focus on the bride, you hear the beep and see the red dot. Now with the shutter half pressed, you pan over ...


4

There is a HUGE difference. The 17-40 is good for northern lights, moon-illuminated landscape and such where but it will struggle a bit with noise in other "darker" situations. The Samyang 24mm is very, very fast and quite sharp even wide open if you get a good copy...(BUT NOT VERY WIDE, which is why many night photog specialists usually also have an ...


3

Canon 6D was added to Camera Raw 7.3, which requires CS6. I think your only options are to use the DNG converter, upgrade Photoshop, or switch to another tool like Lightroom.


3

Personally, I think you need to bite the bullet and just carry both lenses. Two lenses is not a huge amount of gear, and the 100L Macro is arguably the best macro lens you can get for the Canon mount. You could rent an EF-S 60mm f/2.8 USM Macro for the trip, which is smaller/lighter than the 100L, but it's not going to replace an 18-135 for walkaround use, ...


3

Most low-cost (say < US$50/set) flash radio triggers do not support eTTL or HSS. They are "manual-only" triggers. It the triggers/flash only have a single contact/pin they're definitely manual-only, because that big contact/pin in the center of the hotshoe "square" is the sync signal and that's the only signal that can physically be communicated. There ...


3

How outdated is the [1D] Mark III compared to other Canon or Nikon cameras in the low/mid price range? A bit. But in other ways, not at all. The biggest advances since 2007 have been in high ISO performance and resolution on the sensor. Comparing a 10MP 2007 APS-H sensor to a current 20MP ASP-C or full frame sensor is going to be a bit like comparing ...


2

You don't need CHDK to accomplish this. I was doing it ten years ago with my little Powershot A520. Including live view and tethered capture using the free Canon CameraWindow software. And it doesn't even support CHDK. You can find Canon point and shoot cameras pretty cheap used.


2

All Canon EF (not EF-S) lenses will work with the camera. What kind of experience you are looking for? It is a fine camera. Current 5D series models have faster autofocus, less noise and higher resolution than the original 5D.


2

The Canon EF 24-70mm f/4L IS USM Lens is the closest to what you desire. It isn't a true macro 1:1 lens, but it does provide .70x as well as a fairly close miniumum focusing distance of 7.9"(200mm). The image quality will far exceed the current zoom lens you have, and the macro quality is very high for a zoom or non dedicated macro. It's a great lens ...


2

What you're noticing is not the focus motor but the image stabilization system. If the focus motor were moving, the focus would change. The IS system will start up when you half-press the shutter button.


2

The RF-603C II is a radio transceiver. The YN-568EX II has a built in optical receiver, but no radio receiver. To use a wireless radio transmitter like the RF-603C with the YN568EX-II you need to attach a radio receiver compatible with the transmitter you are using. The built-in optical receiver of the YN-568EX II will only work with an on camera flash or ...


2

You need three RF-603II units: one on the camera to act as trasmitter, and one on each flash to act as receivers. The YN-568EXII does not have any built-in radio slave capability. All its slave modes are optical, and to be used with the RF-603IIs, a flash must be out of all the slave modes (because they tell the flash to listen only to the optical sensor, ...


2

Basically you can divide lenses (or just about anything really) into 3 categories: Lenses that are really good for one thing and one thing only (or a small set of things) Lenses that are not great at anything but are ok for a lot of things Lenses that cost a fortune (and still can't do everything) Now, since you are a newbie I assume option 3 is out of ...


1

F/1.4 vs, f/4 is three full stops. That means the f/1.4 lens allows eight times the amount of light through the lens than the f/4 lens does! This means you can shoot at lower ISO or for shorter shutter times or both. It means at the same ISO and shutter times, with the f/1.4 lens you can capture night sky objects 1/8 the brightness of what you can capture ...


1

I would say that focal length is the most important thing to look at. Somewhere around 35mm-equivalent (so, 23mm or so on APS-C). That's the field of view of most phone cameras these days — because this kind of situation is definitely one they need to cover. Similarly, kit lenses tend to be zooms covering this range, for the same basic reason (although see ...


1

The short of it is that the you will want to look for the same attributes regardless of if the lens is for indoor or outdoor use. One could argue that the following short list is of special consideration: Focal length (you may hit walls and distortion is a big concern) Weather sealing (not as important if you never go outside) Weight constraints (not as ...


1

Check this? This might help.. http://www.eyefi.com/


1

Try Calibrating the Diopter of Your Camera to see if that helps. Since having the Diopter not calibrated may make the lens look out of focus.


1

Without more details about what shooting modes and settings you have selected, your question doesn't give us very much to go on. The 70D is a highly configurable camera and with some combinations of settings selected the behavior you describe would be as expected. It is possible that via certain custom settings options the AF has been disabled with a half ...


1

Without more information, generally, you want to find lenses that are the widest aperture you can get within your budget and matches the focal length you desire. The wider the aperture (lower F#), the more light. Also, shooting at longer focal lengths in low light situations will likely require a tripod or lens with image stabilization.


1

Try a rubber band wrench from an auto parts type store, or rubber gloves with your fingers and palm evenly spaced around ring. Don't squeeze too hard--just enough to make even contact. You can also put Anti-seize compound, from the same type of store, on your fingertip then onto the threads. Only coat the threads very lightly; it will spread around when ...


1

Just to put things into perspective, I own a Canon 5Ds, released mid July 2015. it is the first 50MP full frame camera from Canon. Last weekend, I went to a commercial shoot of two simultaneous weddings at a golf club. the project was to show the golf courses capabilities. Now naturally, I used the Canon 5Ds, and for my assistants, one of the very juniors ...


1

It's what the person does that makes a good photograph, not the equipment. That is, the composition, timing, inspiration, the story they want to tell, the way they control the camera to achieve the desired effect are the key things that make a good image. Consider all the iconic photographers from 40 years ago or more, Henri Cartier Bresson, Don McCullin, ...



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