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7

If you read Canon's public statements at the time the EOS system/EF mount was introduced in the late 1980's, they spoke of the longer 44mm registration distance and larger diameter flange of the EF mount, when compared to their existing FD mount that had a registration distance of 42mm, as leaving room for future capabilities. If they had been concerned with ...


6

Yes, you may use the MP-E 65mm lens on a Canon T3. No, you do not need any adapters. Just realize that the MP-E 65 is a different type of lens than what you are probably used to. Not only is it a manual focus only lens, but at each magnification setting there is only a single distance the lens is capable of focusing. The way most users focus is to set the ...


5

You are not paying extra for video. According to this comparison chart the 1Ds3 was the last camera that does not have video and got released 2007. Looking explicitly for something that does not have a certain feature will make you pay more, especially if it's a mainstream feature. Using video or wifi is optional. If you think the 70D is the right camera ...


5

Canon manufactures no lenses in the USA. The "US" versions of each Canon lens model are made in the same plant that all of the rest of that same lens model is produced and are physically identical within a particular production run. To the best of my knowledge, all Canon EOS lenses have the country where they are assembled printed on either the front or rear ...


5

First off, you may want to read: Are there disadvantages to a prosumer camera for a beginner, aside from cost? To get a sense of why your friend mentioned a prosumer model to you, over an base-line entry-level camera. sidenote: Vari-angle LCDs: Also, realize that the vari-angle LCD is not unique to the prosumer model, but can also be found on Canon's ...


4

Yes. Stop shopping; start shooting. The lenses you have are what most folks would already choose for landscapes, cityscapes, and street shooting. If you don't know what lens you should "upgrade" to, then chances are good, you're not ready to upgrade. You need more experience with the gear you do have. And it's when a specific frustration starts to eat ...


4

The STM version replaces the II version. Optically, they are identical. However, the STM has several advantages: 7 rounded aperture blades vs. 5 non-rounded (no more pentagonal bokeh) Metal lens mount vs. plastic A much improved manual focus ring STM vs. Micro Motor (should be faster and much quieter) FTM (Full Time Manual) focusing 13.8" (350mm) MFD ...


4

Reduce the image size. You surely don't want your customers to download dozens of 18 megapixel images just to see spinning products. That won't be the kind of user experience that makes people reach for their wallets. And if you don't need all that resolution, you don't need to record it all in the first place. Try smaller images. Use an intervalometer to ...


4

It sounds like your control wheel is "locked" - press the button underneath it called "unlock" This should now let you control the aperture.


4

I believe that the "obvious" change here should not be underestimated. After my recent switch from APS-C (Canon) to full frame (Nikon) even with the brand change and the different user interface my biggest challenge are implications of DOF and the fact that because of that the focusing needs to be much more exact.


3

On my camera there is a piece of silicone rubber on the Strap designed to do just this. You remove the mounted eyepiece and then put the silicon you have on your strap onto the camera. Is it Worth? Yes IF the light is coming from behind.


3

No, not really. All the current Canon dSLRs that are less expensive than a 70D will have video and wifi capability in them. And if you go back for enough for a camera without those capabilities you're not getting the same sensor/image quality. The difference in pricing between the tiers comes down to the number of physical UI controls, menu selections, ...


3

It seems several things are going on here at once. You seem new to using PDAF through the viewfinder of a DSLR. There is a learning curve involved. It is just as significant a learning curve as the one encountered when moving from a compact, small sensor camera that yields almost limitless depth of field to a larger sensor camera that means the depth of ...


3

Most low-cost (say < US$50/set) flash radio triggers do not support eTTL or HSS. They are "manual-only" triggers. It the triggers/flash only have a single contact/pin they're definitely manual-only, because that big contact/pin in the center of the hotshoe "square" is the sync signal and that's the only signal that can physically be communicated. There ...


2

I read that my Canon Speedlite 430EXII could only be used as a slave on my new 5D Mark 3 and that I should buy a new flash. That's simply wrong. Any Canon EX-series speedlight (and many third party flashes) will work just fine with your 5Dmk3 provided you use them on camera, or off camera with the right cable. Your 430EXII is a great flash -- it's ...


2

THe 430EXII works fine with the 5D3 on-camera. All the features are supported, including controlling the flash settings through the camera menu (as opposed to on the flash directly, which is also supported). The "slave" element you are referring to is as follows: when you want to use several flashes, one on the camera and one or more off-camera, the flash ...


2

Sounds to me like the camera is shooting RAW and hitting the buffer limit. Try setting the image quality option to JPEG fine instead and see if that fixes it.


2

You haven't given many details, but I have a strong suspicion of what is wrong. Your camera is set to take pictures in RAW. It happens that for this model, RAW isn't available in the full-auto/scene modes, so in that case, it falls back to saving JPEG files. There are two basic ways to resolve this. One would be to leave your camera as-is and use software ...


2

This topic has been covered before, therefore worth a visit Does a viewfinder cover really make a difference? Regarding specifically having a cover for the Canon 7D, it comes on the strap itself. If it is not on the strap, then check the camera box. Is it worth using this silicon cover? in my opinion, Not really! The problem is that you have to take off ...


2

Choosing the "next lens" you need should be based upon a particular need that your current lenses are not capable of meeting. So in order to answer the question you must first ask yourself, "What kind of shots do I want to take that I am not able to take now?" Only then can you answer the question, "What lens will allow me to take those shots?"


2

As others have alluded to here, one possibility is to underexpose the (bright) ambient light and then add enough fill flash to your subject to achieve a sort of day-to-night effect that may be what you are aiming for. Try setting -3 stops of ambient exposure compensation and +1 stop of flash exposure compensation (or equivalent manual exposure settings) and ...


2

All the shots that I took had a bright background If you were shooting at f/33, 1/250s, ISO 100 and still getting a bright background then it's a good bet that it's your flash that's lighting up the background. To get a dark background, you need to arrange things so that the flash that's lighting your subject doesn't also light the background. You can ...


2

It's a common misconception that "low key" means "lack of light". This is not true. "Low key" means the vast majority of the tones in the scene are darker than middle gray and is independent of illumination. For instance a photograph of a dark skinned man in dark clothing against a black wall would be very low key even if photographed in broad daylight. I ...


2

It's almost certainly a co-incidence. Adaptability of foreign lenses wasn't a big thing back then in the SLR world (it was more common with medium format cameras). The simple reason for this was that camera bodies were much cheaper as they were essentially just light tight boxes with a shutter, mirror and viewfinder (you might get electronic metering or an ...


1

Perhaps you could use this online calculator to calculate an appropriate lens in your situation. For example, using the calculator, I can see that (on a full-frame/35" sensor) you'll probably need a lens that has a 20" equivalent focal length or less: To get this result I popped 20 feet in the distance input, and guessed at around 20mm for the focal ...


1

Check if you shoot in JPG or RAW mode. This is important as RAW files usually are bugger than JPEG and it take more time processor in camera to write them to storage card. So switch to JPEG Check if you shoot in burst mode. If you shoot in this more the buffer (very fast memory in camera) will be filled fast and processor will try to write the files to ...


1

Weather resistant, which is what Canon and other manufacturers claim about their gear, can be a far cry from dust sealed. If you read Roger Cicala's blog you learn very quickly how little he regards the weather sealing claims of the camera makers. Here's the one about the fly inside a "weather sealed" lens. Also note his 1/25/2013 at 6:17 a.m. comment to ...


1

"Upgrade" is in the eye of the beholder. And learning to shoot fast-moving wildlife is not a skill you pick up overnight. Even with the gear. I would also point out that the Canon dSLR bodies tier by the number of digits in their model designation. A XXXXD is actually a downgrade from an XXXD, if you're looking at cameras in the same processor/sensor ...


1

No, you will not get the full functionality of the 600EX-RT/ST-E3-RT system with your XS. But you will get all the functionality you would have with the 430EXII or a 580EXII over optical--most notably, remote power control, eTTL, and high-speed sync. The Canon RT radio system added some functionality to the older optical triggering system that you can ...


1

You'll certainly be able to use ETTL with the 600EX-RT and ST-E3-RT. However, you won't be able to use the ST-E3-RT to control your 430EX II units, as it lacks optical triggering. You could use the 600EX-RT to control those 430EX II's optically, including using ETTL, but that kinda defeats the purpose of buying the radio-capable units. Some options: Skip ...



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