Incense

by Bart Arondson

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7

It doesn't look too bad to me. You have to consider that when you're looking at a 5D mkIII image at 100%, that amounts to a considerable enlargement. It's rare to get something really pin sharp at that magnification. The focus point is quite forward so the trees in the centre of the frame are at or near the far limit of the DOF. That combined with the ...


7

Your camera is probably not the best or fastest USB memory card reader you can own, so even if you are using the fastest card you can buy and the camera claims to be using the fastest USB protocol your computer can handle, it's not very likely that it will give you the best data transfer speeds. A high-quality, high-speed external USB card reader (there's no ...


5

The blur can be measured by converting to XYZ colorspace and zooming into a tree trunk with a bright sky as the background. You then measure the brightness profile accross the rapid change in brightness (make sure you pick an area with small gradient in the direction parallel to the tree trunk). I then used this method to estimate the blur. Since the image ...


5

Yes. Canon also has a near-infrared proprietary optical system for wireless flash. It doesn't have a snazzy marketing name like CLS, but is often referred to as "Canon wireless eTTL" or "Canon optical slaving". Like CLS, it can communicate most of the full hotshoe protocol, such as eTTL-II and high-speed sync (HSS). It also allows for control of the remote ...


3

My immediate thought is damaged sensor, but if hitting it helps, it is also possible a connection is loose or corroded and the bump makes the connection good again for a second. You might try taking the camera apart and reseat any connectors you can get your hands on. If that doesn't work, you could try to identify bad connections and reflow solder where ...


3

The 70D unfortunately doesn't support controlling group C directly. It will however fire group C flashes when set to fire ALL. (Source: The manual) The Canon optical wireless flash system still contains all three groups, it is simply a limitation of the camera body. You need something like the 580EXII to control group C.


2

With a tested Minimum Focus Distance (MFD) of 16.81 inches at 270mm and a Maximum Magnification (MM) of 0.26x, or approximately 1:4, you can't really do Macro photography with that lens. And since it is already slow at f/6.3 at 270mm, the minimal gain you would get in terms of MM by adding extension tubes would make the lens too dark to be very useful.


2

I can't look at the RAW image at the moment, but it should be fairly sharp, but likely won't be pixel sharp on a 5D Mark iii at 100% magnification. The 24-70 f/4L isn't a prime lens and it isn't the f/2.8II. It isn't as strong of an optical performer and 22mpix is a lot of image data. (I use the f/2.8 II on my 5D Mark iii regularly.) The f/2.8II will come ...


2

I do not know your specific camera model, but I think in general that the S-to-L scale refers to the size of the compressed jpg image when stored on your camera memory card. In other words, your camera takes a raw picture at most of its possibilities and then compresses it in jpg format to save space on disk. Jpg is a lossy format, it means you can compress ...


2

According to this article in Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canon_EF-S_18%E2%80%9355mm_lens#EF-S_18.E2.80.9355mm_IS_I.2FII that refers to this other page from Ken Rockwell: http://www.kenrockwell.com/canon/lenses/18-55mm-is-ii.htm the only technical difference is a different IS algorithm that recognizes panning.


2

Yes the Canon version is called E-TTL flash and you have similar functions as provided with the Nikon CLS system. You will need to use the appropriate compatible Speedlite flashes (Canon and 3rd party models exist). If your camera is an EOS 600D, EOS 650D, EOS 700D, EOS 60D, EOS 70D, EOS 7D or EOS 7D Mark II the built-in / pop-up flash can be set to ...


1

There are two versions of the Canon FD lens mount. Both versions will work on your camera, but they attach and lock differently. With the original FD mount (which this lens may be), there is a ring at the back of the lens, behind the aperture ring, that needs to be turned in order to lock the lens onto the camera body. With the "New FD" or "FDn" mount (well, ...


1

As far as I can see, Canon don't give operating temperature ranges for their lenses (the specifications for the EF 300mm f/2.8L don't mention a temperature range, and neither does the manual). However, even Canon's top-end, built like a tank professional body, the 1D X (see the "Operating Environment" section on that page) has an operating range of "only" 0 ...


1

Your conclusion is partially correct. You will get some noise reduction as part of the downscaling process. But it will come from the same image and camera settings (shutter, aperture, ISO) won't be different for the S and L modes. It's also likely that the S mode is using a lower quality setting on the JPEG encoder, which will negate some of the gains ...


1

Technically, there is no difference - optically, they are exactly the same. Given the above, it doesn't matter to much, but original has a silver band round it and the II version doesn't. As an aside, exactly the same applies to the 55-250 as well.


1

Not unless you only want to use it at close distances only. The flange distance is 29mm for the XL1 and 44mm for the EF mount, a 15mm difference. The maximum focal length of the XL1 is 88mm, so the lowest magnification ratio that you could shoot at is 15/88 = 0.17x. And that assumes an adapter of 0 length. So not only would you lose infinity focus, you ...


1

You don't need any software to download the images from your camera. Just plug it in. Use iPhoto or Lightroom, etc, and they can download directly. You can also launch Image Capture, which is built into your Mac. This app will likely show your camera being attached, and offers the ability for you to define which application launches when it is attached. ...


1

There probably won't be a macro facility to 'activate' - the 'Macro' designation just means the lens can focus very close to your subject. If you are using the lens at the closest range available on the focusing scale (probably using the longer end of the zoom range at the same time) then you can safely claim to be practising macro photography. There is no ...


1

That is the result of the raw processing program not having the correct profile for the said camera. Getting an updated version should resolve your problem. The list of cameras supported by RawTherapee, together with the version number since, can be found at RawPedia.


1

I'm late to this question, but anyone else making a similar choice should consider that most modern DSLR's lack the optical focusing aids that were standard on manual focus cameras, and using an old lens on a new camera without some sort of aid may be more difficult than using the lens on the old camera. Back before autofocus was a standard feature (or even ...


1

Full frame and APS-H cameras For general information and APS-C cameras, see the answer above. Canon EOS 6D All points function to f/5.6. The center point is cross-type, and all other points are single-line. The center point is high-precision cross-type with f/2.8 or faster lenses (but is not dual cross-type as it does not have diagonal-line sensors). ...


1

I thought about it and researched for a long long time before i purchased my 100mm 2.8L macro lens. This lens does the job of 4 lenses! Number one it's a macro lens, two it's near to the focal length of the 85mm and three, the 135mm. Despite not being able to open up wider than 2.8 it does have IS which those other two don't, so you can let more light in ...



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