Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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13

I don't have a 7d, but I do have a different DSLR with a fixed screen (not on a swivel). At first I was not a live view believer, but I have come around. Pretty much whenever my camera is on a tripod (e.g. landscape, cityscape, architecture Exposure am in live view these days. It buys me a few things: The magnification option lets me check for very sharp ...


9

There is no official successor anywhere, people deduce it based on model numbers. For the 50D, the 60D is the numeric successor and it does supersede it in most features. A few were lost which is why some people say that 60D is not the right successor. This does happen from time-to-time. The 7D is a much higher-end camera and is really for a ...


9

Normally I'd suggest upgrading lenses and not bodies but in this case going to the 6D is going to solve your two problems: The 6D has significantly better low light performance than the T2i/550D Your 50mm will have the same field of view on the 6D as a 30mm on the T2i I recommend you get the 6D and then maybe, if you miss the field of view of a 50mm on a ...


8

First, the thing you need to remember about noise is that it is only indirectly related to ISO. The real culprit where noise is concerned is a low Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR). This is technically answered using controlled testing to illustrate the point in this question: Is high ISO useful for photography? This answer to another question addresses the more ...


5

Clearly, something is broken. This camera has interchangeable lenses, so the first thing you need to determine is whether the body is damaged or just the lens. Switching for a different lens and testing out the camera is the first thing there. And if you can try the lens on a different body (borrowed from a friend?) you can also confirm that separately. ...


4

3200 does seem to be the safe answer, but that said -- don't set your ISO at 3200 and then underexpose. You are far better off to shoot at a higher ISO and get a good exposure, than you are to shoot at 3200 ISO, underexpose and then try and bring it back in post. A well exposed noisy exposure is better than not noisy dark frame. A well composed, well ...


4

Have you checked which metering mode you are using? If you are for example are using average metering then the camera will use the whole frame to decide what setting to use. For example if the overall frame is too dark the camera will try compensate for that. Normally the different metering mode are: Average metering - Uses the whole frame Center ...


3

Let me start by saying there isn't a wrong answer. Either camera you suggested is a HUGE improvement over an entry level model and you are jumping pretty much clean over the mid-range models. I personally jumped from an xTi (400D) to a 5D Mark iii, but I made that large of a jump because I was starting commercial photography work on the side. I know you ...


3

You say the 550D is happily serving all your needs and that you're only looking to upgrade because "it is time". May I suggest keep your 550D. It's a great camera by all means and you're already enjoying it. You can put the money you were going to spend on the camera (both that you mention would set you back more than a thousand pounds) and instead invest ...


3

There are many reasons any given camera's images can become less sharp over time. I doubt you're going to get a solid confirmation, as it would be incredibly difficult to isolate this from other sources of sharpness reduction/variation, outside of perhaps a DxOMark laboratory (with controlled conditions, several brand new cameras, known-good lenses, etc). ...


3

Personally, I would wait for the 70d if you can. It's cheaper and pretty much an all around better camera. Stat for stat, the only advantages the 7D has is that it shoots 1 frame per second faster, which is insignificant compared to the numerous improvements in the 70d, and the 100% coverage viewfinder compared to the 98% coverage viewfinder in the 70d. ...


2

LiveView is generally better when using manual-focus lenses (or focusing most lenses manually, as mentioned by others). The reason is that the focusing screen seen through the optical viewfinder in the 7D is tuned for auto-focus shooting, which makes nailing focus manually more difficult. From KatzEye Optics: The standard Canon 7D screen is optimized ...


2

It probably makes a bit more sense to think about Canon's product line as branching and merging over time, rather than maintaining a static relationship from top to bottom. The x0D line used to sit neatly between Canon's consumer-oriented Rebel (in the US) line and their 1D line for pros. Just as the Rebels branched into lesser Rebels and greater Rebels ...


1

For the most part the metering mode will affect the resulting image when shooting in Manual (M) mode only if you take the reading provided by the meter and change your manually selected values based upon that reading. There are, however, a few scenarios with Canon cameras when the meter reading is used by the camera to select a value that affects the ...


1

If the edge is only on one corner, it sounds like a lens element is probably knocked out of alignment. I'd try another lens to confirm this and then send the lens in to the manufacturer for service. You aren't going to be able to properly adjust the position of the optics yourself and it is possible something is bent inside that would make it impossible to ...


1

I haven't shot a wedding, but I have shot many indoor and low-light situations with a Canon 7D. I wouldn't go above ISO 3200 on the 7D. Even at 3200, there can be significant noise, so if you can, you should try to stay under there as well. You can bring a flash unit and use that (in E-TTL mode) to compensate for shooting at faster shutter speeds and/or ...


1

Shooting performers in low light, unless they are perfectly still, means for you aperture is the prime consideration. High ISO/ Low Noise performance is a very close second. To get the best results in this environment you need a wide aperture prime lens and a full frame sensor. In addition to the gain in low light performance the larger sensor gives you, a ...


1

Either the 6D or the lens would work pretty well. It depends on how you want to proceed with upgrading. One big factor with considering the 6D is to remember that it won't work with any EF-s lenses you have, so if you have aspirations to go full frame, beware of that issue. If you do much shooting other than the low light stuff, the other thing to realize ...


1

In general, moving from one crop sensor to another isn't going to get you much in the way of low-light performance. Certainly, the 7D has (de facto) exactly the same sensor as the Rebel T2i, and the early indications on the 70D's sensor are that it isn't a significant step up in low-light performance. Moving to a full-frame sensor would get you one to two ...


1

Contrast AF may work at slightly lower light levels than phase detection. Additionally, I don't recall if the 7d has face detection or not, but if it does, that only works in LiveView. In general, I find I don't use LiveView for photos almost ever though. It's mostly there to make it so the camera can act like a point and shoot when a novice user is using ...


1

In my opinion, the 7D created a space between the x0D series (through the 50D) and the 1D series. In the same way, the 60D created a space between the xoD series (through the 50D) and the Rebel/x00D series. As such, the 50D had no true successor. For me the biggest differences are: The 50D and the 7D have Auto Focus Micro Adjustment (AFMA) and the 60D ...


1

When the 7D is on a tripod and I am manually focusing, I often use Live View. If I am shooting objects at a fixed distance I will often use it to focus, then go back to the viewfinder to actually frame and take the shots. This is especially the case if I'm shooting in low light where the extra noise from the sensor being energized for extended periods has ...


1

In live view mode you can use the histogram to judge exposure. Although I don't use it myself I understand from this question that it can be useful. You might need to use UniWB to get the most use out of a DSLR histogram.


1

While we don't deal with shopping questions on this site because they are too localized in time and needs, your questions are answered more generically by What to look for in a flash and What do I gain from moving to a full frame? As far as lenses for events go, your costs are a big factor, but for parties you'll want something that goes from fairly wide to ...


1

Well, it depends on your darkest dark and brightest bright you want to capture without hitting the sensor's and signal processor's limit. In general you will have to answer this: why do you do exposure bracketing? E.g. a Nikon 5100 has an EV range of 13.7 by itself, and also uses Active lighting, emphasizing details in shadows and bright areas, so why ...


1

You are right in saying the bracketing depends on the lighting situation. It also depends on the sensor (you might say "the camera", but the lens doesn't matter here), as it determines the dynamic range -- how far the sensor can stand before loosing detail or blowing out the whites. The other thing to consider is how many artifacts you are willing to see in ...


1

I don't familiar with a thumb rule for that, but taking 3 shots with 0, +2, -2 should cover the dynamic range you need and Photomatix knows how to handle it very good. When I use bracketing I sometimes set the compensation (meaning it's not 0) because for one shot the auto light measurement usually does a good job, but in HDR you might want more details ...



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