Orquid "Phoenix"

Orquid "Phoenix"

by ceinmart

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11

Yes, manual focusing is more accurate than phase detect AF (except for the combination of very recent Canon camera + lens). Over at LensRentals blog Roger performed AF tests back in July / August 2012. For almost any combination of camera and lens, manual focus can (given enough time) be better than phase detect AF. Read the whole blog series if you want to ...


11

Based on the specs the 6D has a smaller lighter body better AF system WIFI and GPS built it slightly better screen and more recent UI SD card slot instead of CF (users may have a preference, or a collection of cards already) The 5D mkII has magic lantern firmware option lower price CF card slot is available now plus a host of lesser differences, ...


10

If money's no object then the 5D mkIII is the better camera in almost all areas (viewfinder, resolution, autofocus, shooting speed, card slots, sync speed, weather sealing, video). Canon make a GP-E2 GPS logger and WFT-E7 wifi grip for the 5D mkIII if you need this functionality. Reasons to go with the 6D would be mostly due to weight (of both the camera ...


9

Normally I'd suggest upgrading lenses and not bodies but in this case going to the 6D is going to solve your two problems: The 6D has significantly better low light performance than the T2i/550D Your 50mm will have the same field of view on the 6D as a 30mm on the T2i I recommend you get the 6D and then maybe, if you miss the field of view of a 50mm on a ...


8

Finding the differences is easy. Other answers have already listed them thoroughly, so I will simply refer you to the specification comparison between the Canon EOS 6D and 5D Mark II. To decide between any cameras, you have to go over the differences and give them value according to your needs. The more similar they are, the easier it is, so in this case ...


7

You must install EOS Utility to download pictures directly from the camera. Your computer will not recognize it as a generic drive. EOS Utility will also give you the ability to shoot tethered and control the camera from your computer. Your other option is to use a card reader instead.


7

I'll try to keep my post unbiased and stick to the facts. All of this information is currently based on the spec sheets and what we know from hands on usage of current DSLRs. The 6D has yet to have any public reviews, so any discussion of the AF or ISO performance is not yet based on lab tests of a production copy of the body. This is important to ...


6

Matt covered it pretty well. I wanted to comment but run out of room... I am also deciding between the two but I will not make any move until I see a few full "hands-on" reviews of the production model. I also think the $2100 price point is a bit too high so I might wait until the price drops a bit. Was hoping for sub 2K as the rumors were suggesting prior ...


6

Apparently around 2009 or so Canon began making all models they sell in Japan with only two or three language options in an attempt to discourage grey market purchasers. Even if another firmware version is released, you will still only be able to select from the languages originally included in your camera's menu. One purchaser from Australia mentioned on a ...


5

Canon make a wifi grip for the 5D Mark II called the WFT-E4 II A, which advertises EOS Utility-based control of cameras over a network. This provides similar functionality with PC/Mac based Canon EOS Utility software. There are similar grips available for the Canon 1D range (1DmkIII onwards), 5DmkIII and 7D. However the wording on the page you linked (and ...


5

I think you can use the DSLR controller for Android Though, for time lapse I would suggest magic lantern. Although it's not officially released, nor officially stable, I'm using it on mine and it's stable. You can do timelapses from within the camera. 6d Magic Lantern Forum and 6d Magic Lantern pre-alpha downloads


5

You are using Picasa. If you simply type in "Picasa Canon 6D" into Google, you will see that many other users have this problem. Why are you having this problem? Because Picasa does not support the Canon 6D RAW files. What can you do to fix this? Use the Adobe DNG Converter before opening up the files in Picasa. You could use something besides Picasa like ...


5

For Landscape and Macro work there is very little difference between these two. That is assuming you are shooting RAW and manually focusing as is often the case for those two types of photography. The resolution difference is only about 2.4% in favor of the older 5D Mark II. At ISO 1600 and below the differences in sensor image quality are minimal. Above ...


4

The focus-point issue depends on your personal habits. Many people who shoot a variety of non-action photography, only ever use one focus point. Yes, one focus point, not one cross-type, one focus point in total. You do that using the focus-lock and recompose technique. On the other hand, having multiple focus points and particularly more sensitive ones is ...


4

Is it possible? Yes. You can probably do this by physically modifying the lens. Is it safe? No. The rear element of some (most?) Canon EF-S lenses extends into the body when at the wide (18mm) end. This causes the mirror to hit the back of the lens, potentially damaging both the lens and the camera. People have had success modifying EF-S lenses to fit on ...


4

This is ultimatly a fairly subjective question. I think it does a pretty good job on my 5D Mark iii most of the time. It's also worth noting that you can have the 5DM3 save the individual files used (including in RAW format) so that you can always use software later even if you decide you don't like the JPEG that it produces. There are also multiple ...


3

The AF system alone would make me choose the 5D III over the 6D. (And yes, I did!).. My experiences of the 5D III have been nothing but great. And now I can also attest to the build quality of the 5D III as I dropped it out of a bus onto solid concrete (...don't ask!...) and somehow it is still working perfectly with only minor scratches on the body!! ...


3

Even though you aren't shooting sports, you may be shooting things that are fast moving. For that, only one cross-type point in the center is going to be weak, but whether or not it matters depends on the style of shooting. The 6D is a very good option for full frame consumer users looking to do traditional, family style, photography. You get very good ...


3

The main advantage of the variable filter is that you can turn it so that it is at the minimum setting (letting the most light through). At that point it's about the same as having a normal polarizing filter, so should be easy to focus. Once focused, then carefully adjust the filter to darken to the desired density. In order to get long exposures in the ...


3

You would have to upgrade Lightroom or Elements, as only the latest versions support the 6D. The Canon 6D requires Camera Raw 7.3, which is compatible with Lightroom 4.3 Photoshop CS6 According to Adobe, Photoshop Elements 11 only supports ACR 7.0-7.2. However, it appears the 7.3 update may be applied to PS Elements 11.


3

Typically, a three-lens setup consists of a wide, normal and tele lens. Since your interests are not specifically skewed to any specific focal length range, there's no need to assume otherwise. Unfortunately you haven't revealed much reasoning behind your decisions so far, so the following advice can be taken with a grain of salt. Needing a 17-40L tells me ...


3

You need to update your copy of iPhoto to get the update that supports the Canon 6D. See http://support.apple.com/kb/HT4757 for some detail, especially note that the raw update 4.03 has an asterisk to a note at the bottom: "Aperture version 3.4 or later, or iPhoto version 9.4 or later, is required to install this update."


2

A few things you need to keep in mind. You don't own the 6D yet, you are basing most of your thoughts off of your current APS-C experience. Maybe the best bet is to wait until you do have the 6D in hand, it will be easier to decide at that point. I had a very similar setup to you, I was on APS-C and recently purchased the 6D. I had a few EF-S lenses, which ...


2

I have a different opinion to Stan regarding the 28mm f/1.8 - I like the wide angle blurred background look, partially because it's pretty much exclusive to full frame (or larger) formats. To get the same angle of view and background defocus with an APS-C camera you would need a 17mm f/1.1 lens. Which doesn't exist, in fact the fastest lens you can get in ...


2

A thorough comparison of all the cameras would take quite a while, and it would help to know specifically what kind of photography you do. However, here are a few ideas to get you started in your own research. The Canon t4i / 650D is an excellent camera for a beginner or enthusiast. I've owned both a t1i and a t2i, and I've been happy with the line. Given ...


2

There are many problems with phase detect autofocus that make it inferior to manually focusing using liveview: Misalignment/calibration errors. AF in not performed using the main image sensor, but a separate AF sensor which is supposed to be mounted the same distance behind the lens. This mounting is subject to a tolerance, as are the position of the ...


2

This depends on the camera. On most digital cameras the Live-View image is generated by sub-sampling the sensor. Most cannot read the entire pixels fast enough to resfresh the Live-View fast enough. This means the 1:1 view which is usually around 8-10X magnification is interpolated. When the view is interpolated it becomes very difficult to focus there are ...


2

If you click here, you can see examples of the HDR mode in the 5D mark III. There are actually several presets, so it gives you the freedom to choose one you like. Of course you have less freedom compared with software like photomatix. It is not possible to say which one is better, since this is also a matter of taste. I think its a trade off between ease ...


2

Unlike Nikon, Canon doesn't provide shutter actuation count in the EXIF data. For some of Canon DSLRs this is possible by using third-party applications such as gPhoto2, EOScount or EOSInfo. Canon 6D has a DIGIC 5+ processor, and unfortunately I can't say for sure if any of the mentioned application support Canon 6D or not. EOScount says they can read ...



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