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18

The performance of these two is expected to be pretty much identical since they share the same sensor. If you get the cheaper one (550D) then you should invest the difference towards a better lens. This will have much more impact on your photography than anything else. EDIT To answer comment. Compared to the 550D, the 600D: Lacks an Eye-Start sensor, you ...


13

Canon lists the body-only mass of the 60D at 675 grams and the 600D at 515 grams. These numbers are without batteries. Include the batteries and the 60D is the 755g you quote in your question, but the 600D is only 540g. The 60D chassis is polycarbonate resin (plastic) with glass fiber on an aluminum chassis and moderately weather sealed. The 600D chassis ...


11

The T4i camera body is basically identical to the T5i, the T4i is discontinued because there's no reason to build both. Older models are usually discontinued, there's no issue in getting one, the T4i is still a relatively new camera and is fully supported (and the pictures it takes are just as good as they were before it was discontinued).


10

You'll never regret buying the focus confirm adapter once you forget how much you had to pay for it :-). "Auto confirm" is akin to "poor man's AF", and allows you to achieve, in many cases, close to AF results with far less effort or thought or concentration than pure MF takes in extreme conditions. With auto-confirm you have to "think" a lot less and can ...


10

I live in Sweden and I own a Canon EOS 450D. So far I've never had any problems with it in temperatures down to -20 °C (apart from a somewhat reduced battery life). I wouldn't really worry about your camera not working at sub zero. Every swede I know uses his/her camera in the winter (as well as their cell phones and other electric toys) and to the best of ...


9

I know the answers are quite complete, but I still have something to add. The main reason I went for the 600D was the flip LCD, because I'm quite small and it makes it easier to take shots of things higher up, I otherwise wouldn't reach (and a wannabe-periscope on urban explorations). It's although useful for taking close ups of things close to the ground ...


9

Just set a black and white picture style but keep the file type set to raw. See this post for more information: Do different "Picture styles" affect RAW output?


8

Here is a simple how-to guide for attaching your DSLR to a telescope. With photos, and links to external information on related topics. tl;dr: You need a T-ring (or T-mount) to adapt your DSLR to the T-adapter, which slides into the telescope in place of the regular eyepiece. As you are going to be taking photos of vary distant objects with long ...


7

The bigger the pixels, the less noise there is. This is a matter of physics. More light gets accumulated in each pixel and so it take more noise to appear significant. The 600D and 7D have APS-C sensors which are small and have a high megapixels count. This makes their pixels comparatively smaller than the 5D Mark II which has a larger sensor and hence ...


7

This is kind of a tough question, as there are various different aspects of Canon DPP and Lightroom/ACR that offer both pros and cons for each tool. Both DPP and LR/ACR will produce better results than Picasa, which while it does support RAW conversion, is not a top of the line tool explicitly designed for converting RAW files (it's more of a photo ...


7

This can be accomplished pretty easily just using an Eye-Fi SD card (a standard SD card with a built in wi-fi transmitter) and the corresponding Eye-Fi app on your iPhone. The app connects to the card via an ad-hoc network allowing the photos to be transferred. Eye-Fi cards start around €20 and the app is free on the App Store. More information on the ...


7

As far as I know there are two possible solutions. I will explain both of them below. EOS utility This software is supplied with your camera. It can be downloaded from the internet, but it's a hassle. It's better if you install it from the CD and update it. When you have it on your computer do the following: Connect your camera through USB. Start EOS ...


6

Cheap isn't good and good isn't cheap. Good can be reasonably priced though, for events basically you never want your lowest aperture to be above f4 if you can avoid it, otherwise you'll be looking to use flash, which if you're trying to remain stealthy and go for candids will draw the attention to you. I'd recommend looking at something like the Sigma ...


6

Tamron 17-50 f/2.8 VC/Non-VC comes in mind. Both are cheap and have okay image quality. f/2.8 allows you to shoot indoor while keeping your ISO to a reasonable range. This is a good lens. The Non-VC (VC = Vibration Compensation, similar to IS) version has slightly better sharpness and contrast comparing to the VC version, but Tamrons VC is a good thing to ...


6

It's basically, not (weather resistant). I don't believe any Canon Rebel series is weather sealed or resistant to any appreciable degree more than it looks. It may survive a light spray of water or a little beach sand depending on where it goes, how much, and how long, but its simply not sealed against such things. If you're going to be shooting in any ...


6

The 18-55mm lens in the first (cheapest) kit is a "standard zoom", an equivalent to the classic 28-80mm zoom for film SLRs. It's versatile range being wide enough at 18mm for most landscape and interior shots, and long enough at 55mm to shoot tight portraits (head and shoulders) whilst being a comfortable distance from your subject (which also avoids any ...


6

The camera will automatically record this information in the JPEG file, but not as a picture of numbers superimposed on the image. Some cameras have a feature to do this, but I don't think yours does. That's not necessarily bad, because doing it that way means you have part of the image covered by numbers and you can't get a clean image if you change your ...


6

The good news is that cameras rarely get damaged by cold, even considerably below their operating limit which is 0C for nearly all DSLRs except some from Pentax. The bad news is that they stop working quickly. How quickly depends on the ambient temperature and particular camera. What fails first is the batter which looses it ability to supply current while ...


6

No The 600D uses the built in pop-up flash for the focus assist light, the pop-up flash pops up too close the the external flash if one is connected - there are many external flashes and accessories that would be hit by the popup flash if it tried to open when they are connected. So, as a safeguard the camera will not open the popup flash if there is ...


5

FD lenses are designed to sit closer to the film/sensor than EF lenses - so there is no adapter that can just place the lens in the correct location (because the correct location is inside the camera where the mirror is). This leaves us with to options: Adapter that places the lens farther than it's supposed to be - this has the same effect as placing the ...


5

Is it worth is a difficult question to answer as it depends greatly on what you would be using it for. There are a few primary areas of differences to review: AF The AF system has been upgraded to a 9-point cross-type. This means that you can accurately focus using any of the 9 AF points and they will work together to determine a solid focus. On the T3i, ...


5

I don't know about you but my smartphone just doesn't have the battery life to make this work. I therefore use a standalone GPS device made by Holux. It's Bluetooth-capable and transmits the GPS coordinates to a Foolography Unleashed device attached to my camera. The Holux device runs the whole day on a single charge, and with this setup all my images ...


5

Eye.fi makes SD cards that will transfer the photos to their app on your iPhone or iPad directly. It's called "direct mode".


5

Probably the best source of free information on shooting with a Speedlite and umbrellas is David Hobby's Strobist site. http://strobist.blogspot.com/ Do you have two 430s? If not, how are you using the three umbrellas? Most folks put a flash in each umbrella (that they are using) and shoot though the white, so that it diffuses the light. Typical sets have ...


5

What you are seeing is a poor example of user interface design. There are two files with two different names for each RAW+JPEG set. You can easily prove this by using a Command Prompt (CMD.EXE) and listing the directory (DIR command). Something in your system is screwing with your mind by hiding the RAW extension (CR2 IIRC) and showing it as another JPEG. ...


5

Pretty sure you only have one choice for that price. Luckily, it's a good and reputable one for portraits and general low-light usage. They call it the nifty fifty: Canon EF 50mm F/1.8 II. The bright F/1.8 aperture lets it shoot in low light and also gives a shallow depth-of-field which is often used in portraits. Plus, the 50mm focal-length, equivalent to ...


5

The easiest poor man's way would simply be to take a simple trigger that works off a circuit closing. Remove the switch, wire up a bunch of additional switches in series and the circuit won't be completed unless all switches are pressed. It requires some manual work, but is probably the absolute cheapest way you could accomplish the goal.


5

The Live View screen will by default try to 'mimic' the exposure you're likely to get with the settings you have dialled in. So in dim light with ISO 100, a fast shutter speed, and a small aperture, you will likely just see a black screen. When you half press the shutter the camera brightens it up while it meters the scene and so you can see what you're ...


5

I am sorry to tell you that the Canon T3i does not have any internal memory that stores photos. Any pictures you have taken that are not on a memory card are lost and in fact never existed. I highly recommend you go into the settings and choose "Shooting 1 (the first red icon)" and set "Release shutter without card" to disabled. This will help keep you from ...


5

It depends on the camera, but generally the JPEG is shown and the histograms correspond to the JPEG as well. RAW isn't actually an image file, it is sensor data. Without further image processing it can't be displayed as a particularly meaningful image since it would lack color information and would not be true black and white either due to color filters on ...



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