The Sleeping Giant's Sea Lion

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15

The 5D's native RAW format is 12bit and the 5DmkII's RAW format is 14-bit, perhaps you are thinking of when you import the image into your image editor and you can select 8-bit or 16-bit editing? 5D Specs: http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canoneos5d/page2.asp 5DmkII Specs: http://www.dpreview.com/news/0809/08091705canon_5dmarkii.asp


15

From my experience with my 7D and now a 5D (mkIII), I'd say for wildlife stuff, the 7D would be your preferred choice, for four reasons:- APS-C 1.6x crop sensor. This will extend the reach of any and all lenses you put on your camera. A 200mm becomes a 320, a 400mm becomes a 640, etc. Using teleconverters will cost you light, and therefore require slower ...


14

Did you use the CF card in your computer and either store non-picture files on it, or delete the files without emptying the trash / recycle bin when you were done? A bunch of hidden files can fill up the card's space pretty quickly (happened to me a couple weekends ago; luckily I always carry a spare). It could also be a corrupted card, and some sectors ...


14

When you look closely the only thing that is the same on the feature list is the approximate number of megapixels. The mkIII is an entirely new camera, new type of chassis, new viewfinder, new shutter assembly, new button layouts, new software. Nothing has been recycled, unlike the mkII. the higher FPS shooting, and the dual storage to SD Card are nice ...


13

Let me tell you a story. In the beginning there were the D30 and D60, which were 3 and 6 megapixels respectively. Simple. But then they moved the D to the end and released the 1D, 10D and 300D (would have made sense to call that last one the 100D, but whatever). The number of digits now meant the market the camera was aimed at, 1 digit was a professional ...


11

For pretty much all of the types of photos you wish to take, the 5D II will be a better camera than the 7D. The 7D excels at action photography, with its superb AF system, high burst rate, and high resolution. It is an ideal camera for sports, wildlife, and birds in flight. Its high resolution sensor makes it easier to get good high res crops. The APS-C ...


11

Is the Canon 17-40mm L lens good for architecture and real estate photography - Absolutely. Keep in mind that especially at 17mm you will need to remove the barrel distortion in post processing. If you are especially worried about this, and want to take the extra time and attention that it requires, you might be interested in tilt shift lenses or perspective ...


11

The zoom helps with crop sensors but that's not the main reason. Basically on a full frame sensor the 8-15 is two lenses in one, at 8mm it's a full fisheye with a circular image and a 180 degree vertical field of view. At 15mm it's a diagonal  fisheye, with 180 degrees corner to corner and no black areas. Even if you don't want to shoot circular ...


11

Based on the specs the 6D has a smaller lighter body better AF system WIFI and GPS built it slightly better screen and more recent UI SD card slot instead of CF (users may have a preference, or a collection of cards already) The 5D mkII has magic lantern firmware option lower price CF card slot is available now plus a host of lesser differences, ...


11

If you shoot under 400iso and don't print large, you won't notice much difference in the image quality. If you shoot higher ISOs, the Mk II has less noise. Practically speaking, the screen on the MK I is the most annoying thing if you're used to the MK II. Colour accuracy and sharpness during playback are poor compared to the MKII and newer cameras- and far ...


11

The maximum frame rates are just that - maximum frame rates. There are several things that will reduce the maximum frame rate. High ISO The higher the ISO you have selected, the slower the frame rate will be. Noise Reduction the stronger the in-camera noise reduction selected, the slower the frame rate will be. AI Servo Mode If you are using AI Servo AF ...


10

Canon has a pretty diverse line of DSLR products, and it can be difficult sometimes to figure out what everything means, and why one particular product is so popular. I've added a comment that contains a link to THE nomenclature decoding thread here at Photo.SE, and that should answer any questions you have about codes in lens and camera names. As for your ...


10

All else being equal, yes. A bigger sensor requires more power. Advancement in power-saving technologies can sometimes improve that but with higher pixel counts being the norm, we do not see much of that. Each pixel requires circuitry so higher megapixels require more power than making the sensor bigger. Luckily bigger cameras have room for bigger ...


9

Refer to page 19 of your ST-E3-RT manual. It specifies that when used with camera models released prior to 2012 (so, anything but the 1DX and 5D mark III at the time of this post) you lose high speed sync and your max sync speed is "one increment slower" than whatever it would normally be. The flash sync speed is 1 increment slower Check the flash ...


8

Although this question is highly subjective, teetering on a flame war, and about two great cameras that aren't really in the same class as each other, if I had zero gear invested, and an unlimited budget I would pick the Nikon D3x. As a Canon guy who owns and loves his 5D Mark II, the Nikon D3x and the 14-24mm f2.8 Nikkor seriously made me consider selling ...


8

Finding the differences is easy. Other answers have already listed them thoroughly, so I will simply refer you to the specification comparison between the Canon EOS 6D and 5D Mark II. To decide between any cameras, you have to go over the differences and give them value according to your needs. The more similar they are, the easier it is, so in this case ...


8

The three primary contributors of blur and/or softness in most pictures are: Camera motion Subject motion Incorrect focus Additional contributing factors can be: Narrow Depth of Field Diffraction Use of tilt/shift with a capable lens Chromatic Aberration Lens Distortion Misaligned/Decentered lens elements Misaligned lens mounting flange Poor lens ...


7

HTP will increase noise as it underexposes the image in order to avoid possibly clipping the highlights. Noise reduction will obviously reduce noise, but at the expense of fine details. All other in camera processing may reveal noise, but not create it. If you are concerned about noise then I would highly recommend shooting Raw and taking full control over ...


7

It depends on what you want out of a body upgrade. If you want certain features, better build quality, handling, ergonomics, or user interface, then you should pick one of those bodies. If you want better pictures, then do not upgrade your body. I think you would get a lot more out of buying better glass and a lighting setup(for portraits and indoor) ...


7

The bigger the pixels, the less noise there is. This is a matter of physics. More light gets accumulated in each pixel and so it take more noise to appear significant. The 600D and 7D have APS-C sensors which are small and have a high megapixels count. This makes their pixels comparatively smaller than the 5D Mark II which has a larger sensor and hence ...


7

I'll try to keep my post unbiased and stick to the facts. All of this information is currently based on the spec sheets and what we know from hands on usage of current DSLRs. The 6D has yet to have any public reviews, so any discussion of the AF or ISO performance is not yet based on lab tests of a production copy of the body. This is important to ...


6

I've tried the same thing on my 5DmkII and it works fine for me: the aperture, shutter speed, ISO and WB I set in M mode are still there when the camera's auto-powered off and been re-awoken. I'm on firmware 2.0.8, and I have auto power-off set to 1 minute. Not sure if it's helpful to mention, but what you've described is exactly what I get if I'm in one of ...


6

The 5D Mk2 has a far larger sensor (because its a full frame camera) and more pixels. My assumption would be the camera scales down the input to 1920x1080 so having more uncompressed data allows it to give a higher quality output. If Andres's comment about it skipping lines whilst taking video is right, then the improvement in quality is more likely down ...


6

Leaving aside the image quality for the moment, you have some fundamental differences between the listed lenses: Canon 50mm f/2.5 - it's a native Canon lens, so you get autofocus and full exposure modes. You can get it new with warranty, and it's not expensive. Voigtländer 40mm f/2 - it has an EF mount but no autofocus. You'll get exposure automation, ...


6

To me this sounds like the Mirror Lockup custom function setting. When using a tripod this is useful as it first locks up the mirror to avoid the shake from that as the picture is taken, allowing the camera to be as still as physically possible when the second click opens the shutter (assuming you use a cable release). This can be turned off in the menu ...


6

The Canon EOS 5D Mark III is an awesome camera and so is the 5D Mark II. The $1300 price difference you quote is obviously significant but what is it worth to you is personal. The first thing to note in the specification is that the 5D Mark III has a 100% coverage viewfinder. This is worth at least half the difference in price and the reason I would never ...


6

Matt covered it pretty well. I wanted to comment but run out of room... I am also deciding between the two but I will not make any move until I see a few full "hands-on" reviews of the production model. I also think the $2100 price point is a bit too high so I might wait until the price drops a bit. Was hoping for sub 2K as the rumors were suggesting prior ...


6

That is any easy thing to found out :) Just compare the cameras. Here I've done it for you. As you can see there are several differences. 22 MP vs 21 MP which is really pretty much the same and so is 0.2" difference in LCD size. What is much more significant: The 5D Mark III has a 100% coverage viewfinder. With the Mark II you can never see exactly what ...


6

Blur and softness can easily be confused. If the camera is truly stable and subjects stationary, there can still be softness which looks like blur. With most - more so on low-quality ones - lenses, you will get softness at maximum aperture and with all lenses you will get softness past the diffraction limit which cause blur at small apertures. If you are ...



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