Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

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44

Having used both lenses I'd say no it's not worth the upgrade. The f/1.4 version is two thirds of a stop faster, which means where you'd use ISO 800 before you'd theoretically be able to use ISO 500. That sounds good, however that's only in the centre of the frame, the corners get significantly darker wide open. I rarely use mine wide open so for me there's ...


23

I had exactly the same problem when I first tried to photograph the moon: all I ever got was an overexposed white circle. The answer is that the moon is much brighter than you realise. Also, unless you have a very telescopic lens, it's going to be pretty small in your photo. If you use one of the camera's automatic modes, the camera will try to get the ...


19

The exact same camera is sold as 550D in Europe, Rebel T2i in the US and (I think) KISS X4 in Japan


19

Yes, it matters, a lot. There is little difference in image quality between cropped-sensor bodies these days and certainly a lot less compared to the difference in quality between a poor and a quality lens. Even between a D5100 and D7000 which costs much more, the quality difference is small. The same is true in Canon's line-up. Even more important, the ...


18

The performance of these two is expected to be pretty much identical since they share the same sensor. If you get the cheaper one (550D) then you should invest the difference towards a better lens. This will have much more impact on your photography than anything else. EDIT To answer comment. Compared to the 550D, the 600D: Lacks an Eye-Start sensor, you ...


18

I would gravitate to lens choices over the body. There's a couple of reasons... The lenses will be useful in the future when another opportunity to purchase arises. Fast glass, such as f/2.8 zooms, are very helpful in low light. These are, often, pro grade lenses as well, so that helps sharpness. In the end result, you'll have these lenses for years, the ...


18

You cannot. Use the 2s timer instead which solves another problem too. The first shake occurs when you release the shutter which both 2s and 10s timers avoid. This is obviously the one you know about. The second shake occurs from the mirror in the camera as it raises to take the shot. To avoid this, the mirror must be up when the timer starts. This is ...


17

The 50 1.8, for sure. It's a good lens for portraits and general usage. I even recommend people to just skip the kit lens all together and start with the 50 1.8 when buying a Rebel. It's also a good lens for shooting video because it's lightweight. Since you're into landscapes, you'd enjoy Canon's 10-22. It's a great lens for the smaller sensor and isn't ...


17

I have taken a few years to perfect my moon shots. Many nights stood out in the cold!! On the months where the full moon is not obscured by cloud!! Here is what I do: You need a long lens! The moon may look large in the sky, but it will still be a dot in your viewfinder! Here is one instance where megapixels still count - as for the same reason above ...


15

You, my friend, are in amazing luck, because there is a really awesome website dedicated to strobes (more specifically off-camera lighting). I highly, highly recommend checking out http://strobist.blogspot.com/ The Lighting 101 series is a great beginner guide to getting started with strobes. To better answer your question here, it would help to know your ...


14

I own both, and while both are good cameras, to me the differences come down to whether you want to use a camera that is keeping with the form and functionality of Canon's 'professional' series of cameras, or you don't care about that. Canon 50D Feels more solid (more metal vs. plastic) Screen on top 2 adjustment wheels (550D only has 1) PC connector ...


14

The chances of bricking your camera are extremely low (but not zero). I think something not everybody understands is the Magic Lantern does not install into your camera but to the SD card. My understanding is that the only change that is done to your camera is to enable the "bootdisk" flag, which is a very minor change. This flag tells the camera if it ...


12

Yours has 6 blades. There are a few ways of finding out for sure: Look at the shape of light bursts or bokeh in pictures. I can see how your image above is a bit confusing but it's actually 6 shapes (each with two "outer lines") rather than 12. Likewise, the shape of the bokeh in this shot clearly shows it was taken with a 7-blade lens. However, that won't ...


12

This is not done in-camera but in post processing. If that structure was the only red thing in a frame then selective desaturation would have done the trick, else it is pretty much just selecting the structure and desaturating the rest.


12

You mention that you're looking for something with zoom, and @dpollitt gives some logical recommendations there. Be aware, though, that excepting the most expensive suggestion, these are all quite slow variable aperture zooms, and debates about zoom-vs-prime image quality aside, will generally not share a lot of handling characteristics with your 50mm. So, ...


12

The only sound that would come from the sensor itself would be a self-cleaning function, which only happens when you run the self cleaning, or turn the camera on/off. The sensor vibrates to shake off dust. This would not be happening when you are shooting. When you half press, the sounds you might hear would be from the lens AF motor or image ...


12

You found the image at Mansurov's How to Photograph the Moon, so I think that's a good place to look for answers. Since he suggests using a 300mm lens and 1.4x or 2x teleconverter, I would bet those were used. Additionally, he also mentions that regardless of focal length, you are likely going to want to crop to get a tight photo.


12

For changing the shutter speed, put the mode dial on Tv (as in the image below: make sure the white line corresponds to the letters Tv ), and turn the wheel high-lighted in red below (excuse my crappy images, I edited all this as something quick and dirty). On your LCD screen, you can see the below screen (let me know if you don't know how to get to this ...


11

Yes but you may not want to after knowing that most underwater housings cost far more than your camera. Here is a housing designed for the T2i. You also need a matching Lens Port which has to be the right size for the lens you plan on using. Really, that is all you need. You can take it down to 100m. If you plan to snorkel instead of scuba dive, you can ...


11

It depends on a few factors. How deep do you wish to go with your camera? How much control do you want over the camera while underwater? Do you plan to use additional lenses besides your current lens? A similar question has been asked before: Here Without knowing the above, I can show you a few options that are available. Typically underwater housing ...


11

Without more details about what exactly you find lacking in your current setup, that camera and lens is certainly capable of capturing fine portraits. They would not be inherently limited by that lens and camera. (The lens is just barely in that 'prime portrait' range though, so a longer (85mm or 100mm+) one certainly wouldn't hurt.) If its gear you feel ...


10

If you're new to DSLRs, it's worth sticking with the brand your friends use; not just so you can borrow stuff, but for the free advice as well.


10

Differences between what you see on screen and in print are most likely due to calibration problems. Not all monitors display the same colour value in an image file the same way! Assuming the printer is not the problem then it is likely that your monitor image has a magenta tint to it which is preventing you from noticing the green shift. There are tools ...


10

Your best bet for high quality images on a budget is to shoot several images of each canvass and have some panorama software assemble the images automatically on your PC. This will quickly turn your 18 megapixel images into 50+ megapixel images worthy of a medium format DSLR. You'll also be able to get away with the kit lens if you have enough light. If ...


10

what's holding you back is that you are too gear-minded. Rather than thinking "I have this gear, now how can I use it to do what I want to do", you're thinking "what new gear do I need to do what I want to do". That way you will always be "held back", because you're never going to actually fully use what you have, will constantly be worrying about what you ...


10

My answer is going to be short, on this one: Your camera can't do it, and Even if it could, do it in post. Why? Because you might wish later that you had the full-color image down the road. Secondly, post-production will almost always give you a better result than the camera itself will. There are many options that will do this in Photoshop, Paintshop ...



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