Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

by sat

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

19

The Canon 100mm f/2.8 is a great lens for macro photography. It is indeed possible to use it on the 450D, as I do so myself. However it should be noted that due to that camera's 1.6x cropped sensor, you get an "effective focal length" of 160mm. This is due to the fact that the 450D has a narrower field of view than a full-frame camera like the 5D or 1D ...


17

It looks like you might be asking about the maximum burst number. It tells you how many pictures you can take before the buffer is full. As you take pictures, the number will go down, and it will go back up as the buffer clears to the memory card. Taking pictures closer together (or using continuous) will deplete the buffer faster.


16

As an owner and user of both the 450D and the EF 100-400mm, I can offer some help here. From a construction, durability, and handleability perspective, using the 100-400mm on the 450D will definitely not be a problem. Both the camera and the lens are durably built, and the lens mount can handle a considerable amount of rugged use and rough handling. The ...


14

You have all of my sympathy, because a few years back I was in the exact same position as you are (well to be honest, I'm still on the budget). So, with only some point & shoot experience, this is what I did. This might be partially subjective rant, but I think it offers a good beginner perspective when considering the first lens. After gazillion hours ...


13

It sounds like you've got long exposure noise reduction turned on. After taking a long(ish) exposure photo, such as 2 seconds, the camera takes an identical length exposure but with the shutter closed. This gives the camera an image of the noise (since no light it coming in the image can only contain noise) that can be subtracted from your original image. ...


13

Yes you are looking at clipping by the mirror box, I'm afraid it's unavoidable when using a lens with large aperture and exit pupil close to the film plane at certain focusing distance. Even if the mirror box doesn't clip the light cone the lens barrel will (for off axis points of light) leading to cat eye bokeh. Here's an example from a full frame camera ...


11

The AF gizmos won't do their thing unless they are told that there is a lens on the camera. (Remember that the EOS/EF lineup was designed from scratch to be the latest and greatest all-electronic autofocus camera system back in the late eighties. The legacy Canon lenses would not fit physically so there was no need to accommodate them at all.) When using ...


10

As someone who owns a 450D myself, and who has a friend who owns a 500D, I would say the 500D is worth it. Functionally, there are few differences. The 450D has a 12.2mp sensor, while the 500D has a 15.1mp sensor. Not a huge difference, but enough to make a difference. The 500D supports two stops higher ISO (6400 instead of 1600...12800 is digitally ...


7

I don't have this lens, but from what I read it should have a rotating tripod mount. If I understand that right, you can just loosen the screw on the side and turn the mount around (or rather turn the lens and camera when it's mounted on a tripod). If so, your problem is simply that the mount is not locked in the horizontal position. There should be a ...


7

The 450D can take EF and EF-S lenses, so the 100mm f/2.8 macro will work on it. I would, by the way, recommend the IS version of it, though it is substantially more expensive. Macro shooting has very little tolerance for shake, so without IS, it can be harder to do. As for the lens, it's top notch, I've seen some stunning shots from it. However, if you want ...


7

The 18-55 IS kit lens is actually an excellent lens, especially for the money. It covers the normal walkaround range, is stabilized, and is surprisingly sharp. Getting this is a no-brainer. (Not getting its older brother, the 18-55 without IS, is equally a non-brainer; that was an absolute piece of dreck). Replacing it means spending quite a lot of money if ...


6

DPReview's done a great job on that. Highlights (advantage XSi): Higher resolution Better autofocus Highlight tone priority Improved viewfinder Of these, the sensor & processor are worth the price of admission.


5

The nifty fifty (50mm f1.8) will always be suggested as a "must have" lens in any camera kit due to it's great value. It's true that it's a great lens for the money. However as a beginner you may find it a bit too long for most situations, if you have an EFS camera. For portraits, it's brilliant. If you have the spare cash it's a no brainer.


5

For that price, I would grab a 1DMkII. That sounds like a pretty good bargain. Its about the same price as my 450D when I purchased it new (well, perhapse a couple hundred more), and even though the 450D has a larger MP count, the 1D still has several advantages: Larger sensor (1.3x crop vs. 1.6x crop), so wider FOV It'll make better use of EF lenses, ...


5

2 years ago I upgraded from a 400D to a 5D(Mk I), and am really happy with the upgrade. At the time, my primary reasons for upgrading were: Full-frame sensor size, compared to APS-C (I know this doesn't fully apply to you) Spot metering It was a bargain! (And bought from a friend who I knew looked after it) In terms of saving for a 5D Mk II or a 7D, and ...


5

The Canon 450D/XSi has the ability to automatically bracket exposures +/- 3.0 EV, in 0.5 or 0.3 EV increments. To get to the AEB menu you have to have another thing setup correctly. It is displayed only in the P, TV, Av, M or A-DEP modes, not in any of the 'Basic Zone' modes (such as full Auto or the Scene modes). Once you have that setup, hit the Menu ...


4

The 450D does indeed have a "no flash mode" on the dial but as John states it's one of the auto modes so you can't select aperture etc. There is no way to disable the flash through the camera menu unfortunately on the 450D, the xxD models and above do have a custom function to stop the flash firing (handy if you just want the AF assist lamp) but that's not ...


4

Probably not. The 1d is a pro level camera, but it is also a fairly old model relative to the 450D. While the build quality is probably higher and it has the look and feel of a pro camera, from a technical aspect, it really isn't that much higher quality, and in some ways it's actually lower than the 450D. The 450D has a digic 3 processor and a 12MP sensor, ...


4

I've found a couple remote timers that will work with the Rebel line. Only one of them seems to actually support more than 399 explicit exposures, up to 9999 (or unlimited, which will apparently shoot until you manually stop it.) It is fairly cheap at $45, compared to nearly $200 for the TC80N3. Wired: RainbowImaging LCD Timer Remote Control for Canon EOS ...


4

Looking at the raw file, the JPG preview looks fine, but there is about 1/6th of the RAW image that is blanked out. It could have been a glitch in the camera, an error on the card, or an error in the transfer to your computer. If you still have the image on the card, I'd try to transfer again. Then reformat the card and see if it happens again. If it ...


4

Since you're looking to do this with the built-in flash, the answer is a simple "no, sorry". Some other Canon models can use custom firmware which might be able to enable what you want, but not this one. I would suggest getting a very cheap manual flash which you can trigger by hand, if timing isn't vital. Or, at a higher cost, many non-manual hot-shoe ...


3

There isn't anything 'Normal' which you can do with 500D but can't with 450D. 450D is a very good entry level DSLR. But I'd suggest, if you can, wait a little longer and buy 550D, definitely a bigger bang for your buck. You can compare 450D and 500D here: http://snapsort.com/compare/Canon_EOS_450D-vs-Canon_EOS_500D


3

Almost certainly overkill, but... If you're happy to do a little programming you can make an infinitely configurable shutter control by cutting the connector off a generic remote shutter release and connecting it to an Arduino. The Arduino is a tiny programmable device for electronics prototyping. It'll run for a really long time on regular batteries, its ...


3

Check Pclix. Canon 450D is listed as supported camera, but I'm not 100% sure it fits your purposes. I have no experience with it myself, although it's high on my list (for timelapse experience). These answers might also be useful.


3

Every upgrade should have a reason. So ask yourself: What are the features that you're missing in your 450D? What are the features that you're expecting from 1D? What else do you need to upgrade (probably lenses)? What are the up and downsides of 1D (covered by chills42 and jrista)? Is it suitable for the kind of photography you do? And finally - will it ...


3

Manual setting is usually the right way to go with the flash. What you set your camera on depends mainly on whether you are balancing flash with ambient light and how much output you are willing and able to get out of the flash. If you're using flash only (no ambient light) the shutter is unimportant so long as it doesn't exceed the sync speed (maximum ...


3

Yes, you could use a sync cord (or an optical slave) with a hot shoe adapter to provide another hot shoe for your GPS unit. Since the GPS unit doesn't have camera brand specific models, we can deduct it does not need TTL info, just the basic flash signal. Based on this thread it seems using a sync cord will not disable popup flash on your camera, but you ...


2

The answer depends on the effect you want to achieve. First you need to workeout how to set up your flash based on distance from object to flash and camera f-stop. You will need a table to allow you to work out how to set up your flash (such as this one - there may be something similar on your flash unit) based on the following information: Flash guide ...


2

No it won't work, not without an updated module. In order for companies like Quantaray (it's actually rebadged Sigma) to produce flash guns cheaply, they've separated the flash from the electronics that interface with the camera. This separated component is what I am referring to when I say an updated "module." Along with producing a standard flashgun that ...


2

The Canon 1D MkII is a professional grade camera - see review of it here: http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canoneos1dmkii/ £500 seems like a bargain especially if it was about £3000 when new. Even though it is 6 years old I am sure it will take better (and faster) pictures than most new DSLR's of that price. You need to consider the size and weight of the 1D ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible