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by Bart Arondson

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21

I believe this has to do with Long Exposure Noise Reduction. To cancel out noise the camera will close the shutter and take an equally long exposure again, this time capturing a black image with only the electrical noise on it. This information is then used to reduce the noise on the original exposure. In the camera settings you can disable the Noise ...


20

Without a doubt the fact that you're using a prime lens (fixed focal length) on the nikon is causing the difference in sharpness, especially if you're comparing it to the Canon 18-135 kit lens or Sigma 17-70 DC. Not that those are horrible lenses but the gulf in sharpness between them and the NIKKOR 35mm f2 fixed would be very wide. I'm assuming you're ...


16

The sharpness differences are probably due to the lenses, not the cameras. In general, you will find that prime lenses are sharper than zoom lenses, and lenses with short zoom ranges are sharper than lenses with long zoom ranges. So I'm not surprised that the borrowed 7.5x zoom lens is not as sharp as your 4x zoom lens, which in turn is not as sharp as the ...


13

This is due to the High ISO Noise Reduction and/or Highlight Tone Priority filter being set to on; if you turn this off you should get back to about 17 RAW frames in the buffer. Source


9

When performing a test to determine X its best to remove all the variables you're not testing for. If you're wondering about the sharpness of your lens: Shoot on a tripod Use manual focus with live view for critical focus Use mirror lockup Shoot in RAW Use a low ISO, at a reasonable shutter speed Turn IS off The problem with your example is it looks ...


9

Look up Long Exposure Noise Reduction in your camera's manual. Depending on the model, you may or may not be able to continue taking photos. Some models do the processing immediately after the exposure. Some allow you to continue to take exposures, and then do the processing. This feature uses dark frame subtraction. The idea being that if you expose a ...


6

Firstly, the 70-200 is not what I'd call a "walk around" lens It can be cumbersome and get heavy after a while especially if you have the f/2.8 version. As someone mentioned before, the f/4 version is a lot lighter. For a regular all-rounder have you considered the following:- EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM EF 24-105mm f/4 L IS USM EF 24-70mm f/2.8 L USM ...


4

I will be controversial here and offer you the EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5. It's a magical lens. Add a circular polariser to it and you will come back from Europe with some amazing pictures. The EF-S 10-22mm is an ultra-wide angle lens which amazingly focuses very close to about 20-30cm!!! You can take amazing landscape pictures, you will fit the whole of the ...


3

There are plenty of choices, but I would suggest two: 1) Canon EF-S 15-85mm Excellent image quality, recommended by many lens reviewing websites as on par with the professional L series lenses. If you want wide angle and good image quality, this is the best choice for an APS-C sensor. 2) Canon EF-S 18-135mm Average image quality, slightly better than the ...


3

As others have noted the difference in lenses would matter quite a bit in this case. However it's also the case that Canon cameras have stronger AA filters in front of the sensors, which blurs images a little more. Also they are more prone (and this is subjective) to applying noise reduction liberally, which can also reduce sharpness. But again, you'd ...


3

On an APS-C sensor body like 40D, you don't have much options for an all purpose zoom. You also have not mentioned your budget. Here are a list of choices you have: Canon 15-85mm f/3.5-5.6: This is a very good lens with decent wide angle upto portrait length. However, its a little costly considering it's an EF-S variable aperture lens. But image quality is ...


3

That lens tests very highly for sharpness, even at its widest zoom and at widest aperture. For a regular zoom lens I'd normally say don't get too excited about its perfromance wide open at the wide end, but with this lens it really should be very good. My thoughts are: Possibly a focus issue. This is the most likely reason. Try overriding the ...


2

Cheap Radio Triggers I am using triggers similar to these. They are cheap, and work very well (a few misfires / nofires, but still great for the money) Alternatively, you can just use a sync cable for the sunpak and leave the 430 on slave. (Check that the sunpack is low voltage first - i.e. it's safe to attach it directly to your camera). Edit link ...


2

If you're on a PC, you should be able to use EOSInfo which supports retrieving the shutter count on cameras using the Digic III and Digic IV processors (except the 1D range). If you're on a Mac there is an equivalent tool


2

For sheer reach, you could try the Canon EF-S 18-200mm F/3.5-5.6. The image quality won't be great compared to an expensive lens, and the aperture is a little restricting in low light, but you get a very usable range from wide to telephoto all in one.


2

Don't bother. I agree with Itai's comment. In questions like this it's hard to commit to yes or no since one is so unsure of what is actually broken. It could work after you treat it, but the risk vastly outweighs the benefit. 25% function is still better than 0%, and the only way you can be sure it won't be further broken (or might even get fixed!) is by ...


2

How about some variation of tethered capture? If you're willing to hook up a laptop, you should be able to control exposure over a series of shots w/o disturbing the camera. You may also be interested in an Android-based DSLR controller that hit the market last year. The 40D is one of the gray-area cameras that's supported, but not with full ...


2

The extra time that the camera takes to store long exposure shots is caused by the extra processing that the camera has to do to reduce noise. It may help to turn off long exposure noise reduction if you are using that.


2

For my backpacking trip across Europe, I carried couple of lenses, however the lens that I used the most was Tokina 11-16 f/2.8 that I rented out. It takes a while to get used to it and I'd rent it again if I go back. I did take a longer lens to capture few shots, but nothing captures the streets of Montmartre/Latin quarter.. or the old city in prague like a ...


2

I do agree with jwenting on the view that you should bring two lens instead of one. On the notion that different lens serve different purposes and the also the extreme odds of one the lens being damaged during the trip. If you are comfortable with Third Party lens, ie Sigma, i can offer you these two suggestions, which I am using for my overseas trip as ...


1

If you don't wish to adjust each shot manually then you could get five bracketed shots on a Canon by doing the following: 1. Go to camera menu and enable auto bracketing (AEB) 2. Set AEB exposure to be -1 0 +1 3. Take your first three photographs 4. Go to camera menu and set AEB exposure to be -2 0 +2 5. Take three more photographs. You now have six shots ...


1

Never travel with only a single lens. One time I did that, it of course failed (aperture blade failure, snapped spring it turned out later). Had not a fellow traveller in the group just happened to have a spare lens and the exact same camera I had (lucky, Minolta wasn't all that common even way back then) I'd have had no photos of 3 weeks of a 4 week ...


1

Aside from everything already said, and assuming you can put the same lens on both cameras, you have to be sure that the in-camera settings on both bodies are the same; i.e., sharpening, noise reduction, etc. It is likely that this is, in practice, not possible — even when all are set to zero. You need to dig in to the menus on both cameras and set things ...


1

The answer to your question about differences in sharpness, between the Canon and Nikon cameras, can be found in dpreview.com's test results. For the Canon 40D 2100 LPH Horizontal 1800 LPH Vertical For the Nikon D90 2200 LPH Horizontal 2150 LPH Vertical It is true that the Nikon has marginally better sharpness, in this case, but the ...


1

This is a hard one to answer because there's so many variables: in addition to the different bodies, you are using different lenses and likely have different handholding technique. Assuming you are shooting JPEG, my guess would be that the Nikon is using more aggressive sharpening. Short answer, no, there's no real difference in sharpness between ...


1

You should check the speed of your CF card. It may be the bottleneck. Also, I am not sure (don't have the manual in front of me now), but maybe the max continuous rate is for smaller RAW files, and not max size RAW?



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