Serene Life

by garik

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26

This is my low-light hand-held shooting technique: Assume a stable posture, usually not leaning in any direction. Support the camera's weight with the left hand. Grip firmly with the right but let the index-finder loose. Press the shutter-release halfway and wait for a focus-lock (When using AF) Breath in Exhale Gently press the shutter-release fully. Wait ...


22

General Rule The general rule of thumb for 35mm (full frame) has been the reciprocal of the focal length. This means that for a 50mm lens, the minimum shutter speed when hand-holding is 1/50 sec. 1/(focal length) = 1/50 Since this is usually not an option, 1/60 sec is the next option. Since the move to digital and multiple sensor sizes, the generally ...


16

Aligning can be done for example with stitching-programs like Hugin. add all you pictures to the hugin-project let the pictures be analyzed/matched by "align image stack" (Images - Tab: Feature-Matching) add some points if needed (Control Points - Tab) set optimization to Position and Translation at the most (Optimiser-Tab) Optimize (Optimiser-Tab) check ...


16

I don't know how it works with this lens, but I've seen charts for Pentax's in-body stabilization system where the data shows that contrary to conventional wisdom I.S. gives a (decreasing but still there) benefit up until rather high shutter speeds, at which point it doesn't matter (and doesn't make things worse). If you have the camera on a very steady ...


15

Yes, you can tell what went wrong: out of focus (entire frame) This can be a problem because of close-focus, i.e., the lens and camera never did find something to lock onto before you fired and was focusing ahead of everything in the scene. Sometimes this is because your lens focuses too slow, sometimes it's because there wasn't enough light to provide ...


15

I used to think that blurring was one of those things that was impossible to recover from in post. Amazingly enough it's possible to take an image that is blurred beyond recognition: and recover all the original detail if you know the exact blurring function: So why isn't this done all the time? Well firstly you never know the exact blurring function ...


14

You can determine the minimum shutter speed to avoid camera shake by 1) applying the following approximate rules of thumb. (See Wikipedia article - rule of thumb) 2) or carrying out careful measurements, as I did. 1) The rules of thumb a) With NO image stabilisation The approximate rules of thumb are: Full frame cameras : min shutter speed = ...


14

Okay, mine is not a technical answer, but I think it has some merit that the technical answers lack: empiricism. Try using different speeds and see what you can hand-hold. For each lens (and zoom setting, if applicable), handhold the camera while on shutter priority,and see what the slowest shutter speed YOU can use is without shaking the camera. Different ...


14

Some "tricks" Ninja breathing, as above. Learn to hold breath at critical moment. Body braced in as stable a position as you can get it. "Think like a rock" :-) ie elbows in against body, head pulled down against body, "hunched" posture feet placed consciously firmly and maybe slightly spread. Brace against something !!! - Lamp post railing, corner of ...


13

It is indeed a rule that comes from film cameras. On point 4 the answer is simple: Multiply the focal length with the crop factor of your sensor. Because the sensor is smaller than a full frame sensor, it will not cover the full image circle, cropping out a smaller image. This has the effect of looking like a longer focal length. E.g. on Canon, a 50mm ...


11

I did some quick Google Books searches, and while I can't pinpoint the origin, there are a number of references to it as a rule of thumb or general guideline in the early 1970s, and none that I can find before that. There are plenty of earlier references to the idea that a longer focal length requires a faster shutter but they're all general advice. The ...


10

There are any number of times where you need a tripod: Where the camera needs to be operated remotely. For example were you want to include yourself in the shot (self portraits), or you are photographing sensitive wildlife and your presence would disturb the animals. Where you need to use a long exposure time. For photography at night or in other low light ...


9

A couple of answers have already mentioned the 1/FL rule of thumb. Keep in mind, however, that this is only a rule of thumb, not an iron-clad law. Depending on how steady you are, you may find that you can (or must) adjust it. Good technique is critical here. The same techniques used by target rifle shooters work nicely. First, get the steadiest stance you ...


9

I heard about IS affecting the Bokeh. The reasoning seems sound to me: the optical path (optical IS) is varied or the lens plane is moved (sensor IS) leading to a different distribution of the typical "lens sharpness" compared to a non-stabilized lens. This will perhaps be more visible because you expect a uniform distribution of bokeh on a far-away ...


9

Of course the answer is, it depends. A common rule often mentioned is that to get sharp images hand held, you need a shutter speed that is 1/focal length used. When using this rule though you must also take your format or sensor size into account. Lucky for you, you do have a full frame(35mm) sensor so no factor is necessary. You must also consider if your ...


8

Out of curiosity, are you using any kind of Servo AF? When photographing moving subjects, particularly those that may move closer/farther away while you pan and frame the shot, you should be using an AF mode that continually focuses. (I think the D90 calls such a mode AF-C.) Usually when using such a mode, the camera will lock focus onto something, then try ...


8

A tripod always matters. With a good tripod and head, a camera will always be more stable. There is a rule-of-thumb, which states that the shutter-speed should be faster than the reciprocal of the focal-length in 35mm-equivalent terms to get a sharp images while hand-holding. In the case of a 35mm lens on a full-frame camera, that should be 1/35s ...


7

Assuming you crop to the same area and print to the same size, the amount of camera-movement blur should be indistinguishable between the two cases. Using a shorter focal length will decrease the impact by exactly the amount you have to crop and enlarge. So, it comes down to other factors. The most important (from the narrow viewpoint of camera-shake blur) ...


7

IS modes are used to tell the camera what kind of movement to correct for. All implementations I'm aware of have at least two modes: "normal" to correct for motion in all axes and "panning" to allow motion in one axis while correcting for motion in the other. The exact details of each available mode depend on the manufacturer, for example Canon lenses can ...


6

Maybe Joe McNallys - Da Grip or a String-Tripod


6

The only disadvantages are that it slows down your shooting (you have to wait a second or two after locking the mirror for the vibrations to subside) and that the viewfinder is black during this time so you can't react to changes in the scene. Having said that, you only benefit from mirror lookup when using telephoto lenses, or when shooting slow shutter ...


6

Rather the contrary. Pixel density Of course, as you say, sometimes there is an issue with the sensor - but not directly related with 'more megapixels', but related with the actual pixel density (ie. number of pixels/sensor area). I don't know exactly any more which is the situation right now but it seems that 24 MP APS-C sensors have the biggest pixel ...


5

In addition to the fine answers from the other users, there's one more thing you can do: Take many pictures and throw away the blurry ones. Camera shake is random movement in random amounts, and if you take enough pictures you should be lucky enough to find at least one where there is no shake. Depending on the situation, "enough pictures" can mean anywhere ...


5

I saw this Joe McNally video a while back and found that it helped me a good deal, especially as I have a mild hand tremor. Also relaxing, watching your breathing and making sure you roll your finger over the shutter button rather than press or stab at it makes a big difference.


5

the 1/focal length rule is based on the idea that degree to which detail is spread over the film plane is proportional to the focal length (when the focal length doubles, the blur doubles, any camera motion is effectively magnified), and also proportional to the shutter time (when the time the shutter is open is doulbed, the blur doubles, as twice much ...


5

A couple more instances: HDR (shooting bracketed photos) Panoramas Tripods are often helpful for setting up and envisioning composition (giving you a chance to think about what you're doing) Self portraits Macro photography benefits from tripod mounting because of the extremely narrow DOF found in this sort of photography. In the case of both panoramas ...


4

Most cameras have a wider aperture possible at shorter focal lengths - and vice versa. So, when you are fully zoomed in, you are probably shooting at a narrower aperture, which means that your camera either cranks up the ISO, or slows down the shutter speed, or both to get the right exposure. Therefore, zooming out and shooting with a wider aperture will ...



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