Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway

Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway
by Saaru Lindestokke                

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In addition to the more content related answers, I'd like to add that multiple exposures result in less noise than one long exposure. The phenomenon is described in more detail here and is a standard technique in astro imaging, also called stacking.


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With a single long exposure everything that happens from start to finish is included in the frame. With multiple exposures you can pause to allow changes to the scene to be made without the time during which those changes are made being included in the photo. You can even totally change the composition by changing aperture, focal length, or even to a ...


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@mattdm covered the main points of your question is his answer, but I want to mention an often overlooked aspect of indoor photography (particularly headshots done with external lighting): the quality of your backdrop. If you are planning on taking pictures of someone outside of a controlled studio setup, be very careful to not have them too close to a wall ...


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what the difference would be between using it and just using a single exposure at a slow speed The difference is that you can take several completely different exposures all in the same frame. There are lots of ways you can use it. For example, you could take a shot of a landscape and then a shot of a person against a dark background. The effect you'd ...


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The lighting is the main thing. Choose what you want to do there (try lighting-basics) first. Then, shutter speed doesn't matter (because you are using strobes) so pick the sync speed — 180th or 250th. And because you're providing plenty of light, use a low ISO. (Going up to 400 or 800 to reduce the needed flash power to get faster refresh is fine, though.) ...


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(From a comment by the original poster, who hasn't returned to make it an answer. Post marked as community wiki.) Goods news! My sister just fixed this issue for me. What I didn't realise was that it still had the normal manual settings, and all I had to do was turn the main dial until it wasn't in BULB mode, or in LIVE TIME mode. But the reason why I ...


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Did you add the lens to Non-CPU lens data in the setup menu (spanner icon)? Non-CPU lenses will only work in A or M modes. Wait, what year is the lens? If it's the 1964-1972 model it won't work correctly unless it is Ai-converted. If it hasn't been converted, the camera has no way of knowing what aperture the lens is set at. You also risk breaking the ...


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If both the subject and the camera are located on Earth (or any planet), the distance to the horizon is an upper bound. As explained in the link, with the camera at 1.7 meters above the ground and assuming a spherical planet, the curvature of the Earth limits sight to about 2.9 miles not counting any refraction caused by temperature changes in the air ...


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This is not a practical answer (it is not a practical question), but it is a precise answer. Let's define "not visible". If in an image, I will offer a description of "not visible" that the object is not more than one pixel size in the image, which certainly will not be considered visible (probably 5 or 10 pixels works as well ...), but "it depends", on ...


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I will just give you a glimpse of what are you asking, so you can do your own math. We need to take in account: The object 1) What is the color. Diferent colours have diferent wavelengths, so this affects on the sensor reception, difraction, atmospheric absortion, etc. 2) The contrast with the background. This is pretty obvious, a white board on a white ...


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Under bright sunlight conditions, a young person with 20/20 vision can resolve an object that is approximately 3000 diameters distant. A 2 meter square object has a diagonal measure of 2.8 meters. This object if viewed from 2.8 X 3000 = 8,400 meters, will appear to be a point without discernable dimension. The 3000 times its diameter rule of thumb is too ...


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There is no "one answer", it depends from too many variables. It depends on the size of the object, the focal lengh of the lens mounted on the camera, the resolving capability of the lens (its optical resolution, so to say), the resolution of the sensor...and the definition of "not visible" for who is watching the final image. Uh, and the type of light ...


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In the Fuji X100 line, the main purpose of Macro mode is to switch you to the electronic viewfinder, rather than the optical one. Basically, you can't use the optical viewfinder on macro shots without misframing, due to the parallax caused by the viewfinder being offset from the main image-taking lens. At macro distances, the brightline shift in the OVF ...


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The Canon 7D Mark II is a very configurable camera. One of the options the user has is to choose which options are selectable from various menus. ISO speed setting increments is one such choice. On page 434 of the EOS 7D Mark II Instruction Manual there are instructions on how to set Custom Function 1 (C.Fn1: Exposure) --> ISO Speed Setting Increments to ...


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Check advanced options to see if ISO step is in 1... if it is, change it to 1/2 or 1/3 as needed.


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The main fundamental thing to get used to is doing the crop math in the other direction with FX lenses. What you're used to seeing as 50mm with your crop body, on full frame, will look like 35mm on your crop would. Having all your glass get wider is the first disconcerting thing you think you're prepared for, that you really really aren't. Particularly when ...


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In simple terms, the "baseline" exposure in cameras in the "olden days" was 1/125 shutter at f/8 aperture on ISO100 film. This would a give good in bright daylight. I expect camera shutters were actually calibrated for that 1/125 of a second. Going faster by a stop just meant doubling to 1/250, 1/500 and do on. Going slower, you didn't want to express it to ...


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Really you are making two transitions here. From a D3200 you need to accustomed to a pro body with dual control-dials, more direct controls and a 100% coverage viewfinder. This would happen if you are to move to a D500 or D7200 instead too, even though these are APS-C cameras. While you can probably ignore the extra buttons ;) it is best to get accustomed ...



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