Lightnings taking a ride

by ceinmart

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39

Actually 1/125 is half of 1/60, ±0.06 f-stop. It should be obvious by looking at shutter speeds that they were chosen to be the reciprocal of nice round numbers. Start with 1 second and keep dividing it by 2. Note that you missed the discrepancy between 1/16 s and 1/15 s. If you kept going in strict mathematical multiples of 2, then 1/60 s should ...


25

Yes, professionals do use auto mode. Professional paparazzi use auto mode almost exclusively and will sometimes even tape up the controls on the camera to prevent any settings being accidentally altered. You don't have to know how to shoot manual to make money out of photography, if for example you know which restaurants which celebrities go to... Other ...


24

The difference between the "actual" shutter speeds at powers of 2 (1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, 1/32, 1/64, 1/128, 1/256, 1/512, 1/1024, etc.) and the rounded numbers we use (1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/15, 1/30, 1/60, 1/125, 1/250, 1/500, 1/1000, etc.) is so trivial as to be beyond the limits of the vast majority of cameras in existence to accurately differentiate. Most ...


18

This is normal because in the day time, the sky is usually the brightest part of the scene. If you lower the exposure by applying negative exposure compensation, your sky will get darker and more blue. This will cause other elements in the image to darken and some may end under-exposed. This is because a change in exposure is global. What you need is to ...


16

Camera settings are never going to make this easy. Photographs need light to work, and while modern sensors are actually quite sensitive, they can't live up to our perceptions, because our brains take the dark, noisy image from our eyes and subconsciously make a mental model where the imperfections aren't noticed. You don't mention what lens you are using, ...


15

Have you heard about the "sunny 16" rule? (In bright sunlight, when you set your aperture to f/16, the shutter speed is 1/ISO). I just checked, I've set my camera to f/16, 1/100, ISO 100 and pointed it to an object in direct sunlight and the meter showed -1/3, I then used an iPhone app to find the corresponding rule for open shadow, pointed the camera at ...


14

settings which influence actual exposure: shooting mode TV,AV,M etc. shutter speed aperture ISO exposure compensation safety shift (Canon) flash (on/off) flash exposure compensation active D lighting (Nikon) - affects raw capture by underexposing for highlights exposure bracketing exposure lock metering mode focus screen setting (telling the camera which ...


14

Your question is based upon an assumption that is not entirely correct: that you can change just about everything in any shot you take. You can't. Things such as depth of field and shutter speed are set at the time the picture is taken. If, for example, the shutter speed is too slow to freeze a moving subject there is absolutely nothing you can do in post ...


13

This comes down to software patents — not on dates, but in a way that limits filenames. The only filesystem which is widely available and cross-platform is FAT, the venerable Microsoft DOS filesystem. It works on both old and new versions of Windows, worked on OS/2, works on Macs, works on Linux, and there are plenty of embedded implementations for the mini ...


12

"Auto" can mean a wide range of things. Most DSLRs offer a "full auto" facility that tends to manage shutter speed, aperture, ISO and more. But most of the modes on a DSLR that are other than absolute manual mode offer a substantial automated component. And even "Manual" may have auto features lurking in the shadows (literally in some cases). Your friends ...


12

Sadly, the feature's name is misleading. In fact, I'd go so far as to say that it's wrong, if not an outright lie. Turning this option on just enables you to use exposure compensation — it doesn't let you do anything actually "manual". If you enable this option, the ... menu at the lower right of the screen gains a +/- icon, as typically indicates exposure ...


12

The size settings actually set two different things for any JPEG images taken by the camera: the resolution of the image being taken (the # x # size), and the quality setting for the JPEG compression for the image. The L, M, and S sizes vary individually by the camera, but the numbers at the top in the blue bar tell you the pixel dimensions. So, in this ...


11

Image size is what if often called resolution, basically the number of pixels stored in the image file. So on a 12 megapixel camera, you can usually choose between 12 MP, 6 MP and 3 MP or similar values. Image quality is independent of size and is usually called compression. This controls how much information is discarded from images while they are saved. ...


10

Aperture: Use the maximum aperture (F1.8 if possible) Shutter Speed: Use the 600/(focal length * crop Factor)rule so as to not see star trails (Refer here in section 3. Camera settings). ISO: Highest possible for your camera that you find acceptable. Milky Way? You can use the application: Stellarium to find out if you are in the right time / place to view ...


10

Unfortunately, this looks very much like whoever changed your headset port has also managed to damage the camera module in some way so that it is massively overexposing. This is very unlikely to be fixable by an amateur - I'd suggest taking it back to the store that changed the headset port and getting them to either fix it or give you a replacement phone, ...


10

You apparently have Highlight Correction activated. This forces the higher ISO limit (usually forcing it from 100 to 200, though you also have Expanded Sensitivity enabled, which gives you a broader ISO range starting at 80, thus now 160). So, there's nothing wrong with your camera. Mind you: Options you find that look superior may come with a downside. ...


9

Without a tripod you will have to have a very steady hand to make real use of the length of your 70-200mm, so I would go with the 24-70mm. The wider end will allow you to take in the majority of buildings and the tele end will let you zoom in on features. There is little point in using Shutter Priority when photographing static subjects. You will be much ...


9

Three things: Practice. Make the adjustments you need second nature, so you can make them with thought only to why you want to make the change, not how to do it. Don't take your eyes away from the finder to make adjustments, if you can at all help it. Get a camera with good dedicated controls, because #2 is impossible when everything is menu-driven. I ...


9

Just set a black and white picture style but keep the file type set to raw. See this post for more information: Do different "Picture styles" affect RAW output?


9

A pop-up flash has barely enough power to work indoors of a residential space; in larger rooms, professional photographers have practical reasons why they carry separate large flashguns. The Puffer, whilst making the light slightly less harsh and therefore more pleasing, does it so at the expense of chewing the power even further down. So, your gear is ...


9

There is no way to change the cameras ISO when you are on the preset Auto mode. This is typical of all cameras. This is because by being in Auto you are telling the camera that you want it to control all the settings. Hence the greyed out ISO control. You can try changing the camera mode to P (Program) which is still an auto mode; but it gives you slightly ...


8

In such situations i would usually be in Aperture priority mode instead of Manual I set my ISO setting to Auto to let the camera compensate for any wrong settings for aperture or shutter speed (refer to this question for the advantages and disadvantages of auto ISO). Also i would set the metering mode to spot metering to get what i want in the right ...


8

It is simply a convention because 30s was deemed a reasonable limit. Nikon, Pentax and Sony all use 30s but Olympus uses 60s. Panasonic uses 60s on most camera but up to 250s. As you can tell by the presence of Bulb mode, most cameras can do more. Olympus limits theirs to 30 minutes to avoid the sensor over-heating or building up too much noise. Other ...


8

In all of the semi-manual modes (aperture-priority, shutter-priority and program auto), you set one or more settings manually. The camera then chooses the rest of the parameters automatically to give you a nominally correct exposure. However, sometimes you want to override the camera's metering, either because it wouldn't correctly expose your subject or ...


8

Exposure is defined as the total quantity of light that hits the film or sensor during the time the shutter is open. Exposure compensation in Tv or Av modes will change the shutter speed or aperture, which in turn changes the total amount of light that hits the sensor, i.e. it changes the exposure. When shooting in manual mode the aperture and shutter ...


8

There is no direct relation between the two. However, there is an observation that with longer focal length you need faster shutter (keeping ISO the same) in order to avoid blur from camera shake. Quoting: The rule of thumb for a sharp picture, free from the effects of camera shake, is to use a shutter speed which is at least as fast as 1 divided by ...


8

You're almost certainly doing something wrong. If you're truly in manual mode - i.e. the mode dial is set to the "M" position - then the aperture won't (normally) change in response to other settings. You change the shutter speed by turning the command dial normally, and you change the aperture by holding down the exposure compensation button (the "+/-" ...


8

In addition to the points mattdm has made, you can shoot a few pictures of the same scene in rapid succession. Unlike when using a tripod, you won't be able to achieve perfect alignment of the pictures; without a tripod, the shifts will be rather large and then the fact that there will be a parallax will prevent you from perfectly aligning the pictures. But ...


8

No. P, Tv, Av, M, Bulb and (in our discussion) the Custom modes (C1, C2, C3 etc.) have all different/independent values for Av and Tv stored in separate memory locations in camera's NVRAM for the user-definable (constant) part of the said program (none for P, Time for Tv, Aperture for Av, both for M etc.).



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