Spring 2012

Spring 2012
by ani

Submit your Photo
Hall of Fame

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

New answers tagged

2

The first impulse is to point up with a fish-eye wide angle lens. I'm going to try get you to point down with a hemispherical mirror facing a normal lens. The cost advantage will be enormous. Maintenance year round will be easier. The downside is that the very centre of your sky view will contain the image of the camera itself albeit reduced in size ...


1

I'd stop worrying too much about the technical details, go to a shop or find friends with modern cameras and just try them out. There are excellent cameras at a variety of price and feature points, which can all take good pictures. Don't go for a simple 'point and shoot' only type of camera if you want to explore more. And don't go for one that has every ...


4

It really all depends upon exactly which part of the AE-1 experience you most wish to replicate. How the controls with which you set the camera look and feel? What you see when you look through the viewfinder? Size and weight? Image quality? A sensor size that preserves what you have learned regarding focal length, field of view, aperture and depth of field? ...


5

I would like to purchase my first DSLR camera with similar features and experience to my AE1 Canon film camera. It's going to be a very apples and oranges kind of comparison. When Canon introduced the AE-1 Program in 1976, it was very advanced and made it a lot easier to take correctly exposed photos. But today's cameras have more and different features. ...


6

DoF scales on lenses is pretty much of thing of the past (see: Why did manufactures stop including DOF scales on lenses?), mostly due to the fact that zoom lenses and autofocus are ubiquitous and commonly used. A DoF scale changes with focal length, and autofocus has made the focus "throw" of a lens much much smaller than in manual focus days, so using a ...


1

Similar experience will be a problem. AE1 is a fairly small camera for todays DSLR standards. If you want something that has similar size, you will have to get a camera with smaller sensor and this is again changing the experience, because the lenses do not behave the same way as on 24x36mm frame. With regards to the DOF scale, this is a feature of the ...


1

What should I be looking for when shopping for a mirrorless interchangeable lens camera (and what should I not be concerned with)? This is really too broad and should be closed but since the community wants to leave it open, its the same as all the stuff to look for in a DSLR. Some examples: How many Megapixels do you really need? Is video needed? 1080? ...


1

You'd really have to give us a general idea about what sort of photography you wanna do. I agree about the EVF, but if you were shooting in a studio tethered that might not be a big deal. OTOH if you are outside in the snow on a sunny day you are gonna need it. Are you interested in video? that's a factor. Wifi? GPS? Many of the same considerations for ...


6

Usual Basics Just as with dSLRs, you will want to consider the following "main" features of a camera system in addition to any gee-whiz features you find sexy: Sensor size and resolution (affects noise performance, and lens size/speed--the larger the sensor, the bigger/slower the lenses are liable to be to keep the system compact). Overall system breadth ...


9

A mirrorless is a system camera and you must therefore carefully consider the system. There 2 major differenciators between systems: Sensor-size: This affects image quality and particularly low-light performance. Four-Thirds and APS-C are popular sizes but there are full-frame options and smaller 1" or 1/1.7" ones too which have noticeably lower image-...


3

Check battery life. Sometimes, in order to keep the camera size small, manufacturers use batteries that do not last very long Check if your selected camera can reuse your existing equipment like good quality lenses from your previous DSLR, flashes, chargers etc. This can not only save some money when getting a new system, but also saves space when traveling ...


0

I'll start with a few comments and perhaps extend them. I'm a lonnnnng term SLR/DSLR user but had a mirrorless with EVF when they weren't called that (Minolta 7Hi) and of late a Sony NEX5N. You REALLY want an inbuilt viewfinder. I consider this a major requirement for serious photography. The rear LCD is not a good viewfinder replacement - it will be poor ...



Top 50 recent answers are included