Orquid "Phoenix"

Orquid "Phoenix"

by ceinmart

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57

I found this page while checking my stats on Flickr. (I'm the photographer that shot this photo) I thought I'd respond with details of how I created this image since I see multiple theories here. First - this is not a stacked exposure. The entire image is a single exposure (30 secs). I used a Nikon D700 DSLR at ISO 3200 to capture this image (at ...


20

On a photography course, you'll get a chance to find out what features you can't live without, and what features don't matter to you at all. You'll also probably get a chance to try out the cameras your fellow students have brought. So my advice would be: borrow a camera from a friend, take the course, and then buy your own camera.


20

Things to look for when buying your first dslr: Price. Far from me to tell anyone how to spend their hard earned cash, but having an idea of what money you want to pay will help. Ergonomics. Does the body feel good in your hands? What about when you have your lens attached? What brand? I'm a fan of Canon. Nikon is equally awesome. There are other brands ...


17

As well as the "bridge" category, there is also the new category that has yet to settle on a name, but is variously known as (Mirrorless) interchangeable lens compact/camera (MILC or ILC) electronic viewfinder, interchangeable lens (EVIL) single lens direct view (SLD or SLDV) These have different lenses available, as do SLRs, but are smaller due to not ...


17

The performance of these two is expected to be pretty much identical since they share the same sensor. If you get the cheaper one (550D) then you should invest the difference towards a better lens. This will have much more impact on your photography than anything else. EDIT To answer comment. Compared to the 550D, the 600D: Lacks an Eye-Start sensor, you ...


16

The general answer to this question is: whichever gets you done with worrying about what camera to buy the fastest. For some people, that means get whatever low-end equipment you can afford to start playing around — get an entry-entry level camera which strikes your fancy plus the kit lenses (and hopefully a decent prime). Treat that as basically disposable ...


14

The good news - all medium format gear is ridiculously cheap now that everyone switched to digital. Cheapest hardware is probably 645, Mamiya was always cheapest and is lens compatible right upto their most modern digital models. Although most people used them as eyelevel SLRs you can get a waistlevel finder for $10 My favorite 6x7 was always Mamiya RB67 ...


14

The Olympus Tough-8010 is the most indestructible camera there is. It is point and shoot, shockproof, drop-proof, waterproof and freezeproof. My baby even managed to take a picture of herself with the predecessor model (Tough-8000) after biting it for a few minutes! Here's a funny commercial for an older model, it gives you an idea of the 'tough' part.


14

It depends on your discipline and self-criticism. If you can truly see the fault in your own work, then yes that is a great way to start. What goes hand-in-hand with this is going to look at photos that you find awesome (books, galleries, museums, even online gallery of famous photographers). This gives you a baseline to know what is possible and lets you ...


13

I would caution AGAINST a Nikon D7000. I love mine. Love it. It's awesome. It's also more camera than a lot of people will really want or need. The D3000 was a lot cheaper, let me get better lenses as I figured out what to do with them, and had nice little tutorials built in. Perfect for a beginning photographer. As a middle case, take the D5100. An ...


12

If you have the budget for it, I highly recommend a digital SLR camera in the mid-tier "prosumer" range. Currently, that's the Pentax K-5, Nikon D7000, Canon 60D, and similar. The brand isn't really important from this point of view, although you may want to compare lens lineups. Read this earlier answer on Are there disadvantages to a prosumer camera for a ...


11

There are many "truths" in photography, and you'll hear them a lot, variations of: The best camera you have is the one you have on you A great camera does not a great photographer make etc etc. (more variations of how the equipment does not matter) To a large extend, the feelings above are true. HOWEVER, I believe that to be a great photographer you must ...


11

You're not going to get better shots simply by switching to a DSLR. In fact, they may get noticeably worse as you start fiddling with the settings. What you (and everyone else) really need is practice and study. This graph is meant to be funny, but it's also frighteningly true. As for a DSLR: it really comes down to how much money you want to spend, ...


11

No Canon dSLR has built in image stabilization. Canon offers it in select lenses, known as 'IS' lenses. So, no, neither offer image stabilization. All Canon cameras also offer noise reduction, and of course, it can be applied (or not in the case of RAW) on the computer after the fact as well. Does it matter? Noise reduction matters, because all cameras ...


10

You might want to try borrowing or renting a camera first. Even the cheapest DSLR will cost several hundred dollars, which can be a lot of money if you aren't sure it is right for you. That being said, DSLRs now are a lot better than they were in pure auto mode, which can make it pretty easy to jump right in. I went from a P&S to a DSLR not all that ...


10

Find out what brand of cameras your photo friends own. The relative differences between Canon and Nikon are fairly small (and probably don't matter until you get very advanced), so a big advantage when starting out is buying the brand the people you hang out with have bought. That gives you a source of free advice, plus the ability to try out cameras and ...


10

Unfortunately, a lot of images like the one you show here are digitally altered and it is difficult to get comparable results. The image above shows the Milky Way, looking approximately at its center, which appears to us to be in the constellation of Sagittarius. To get such a detailed view of the comparatively dark nebulous structures, however, you need ...


10

Big subject. This and any other answer can only be an introduction. You MUST define "cheap" as you see it. What country? Your lens will have an extremely major effect on the result. See below. A P&S can meet your spec but you really want a DSLR. In high light situations some quite basic P&S cameras can work very well. In lower light ("gigs ...


10

If money's no object then the 5D mkIII is the better camera in almost all areas (viewfinder, resolution, autofocus, shooting speed, card slots, sync speed, weather sealing, video). Canon make a GP-E2 GPS logger and WFT-E7 wifi grip for the 5D mkIII if you need this functionality. Reasons to go with the 6D would be mostly due to weight (of both the camera ...


9

I think @matt-bishop's answer really is an excellent one: Find a camera to borrow (or, if you must, rent) for the duration of the course, and then figure out what (if anything -- who knows, you may find you're not into photography?!) you want to buy afterward. That said, I think it's worth expanding on this question -- perhaps even if you borrow or rent, ...


9

All the cameras you suggest produce great images but only the D7000 is suitable for professional photography. The main difference is that the interface will slow you down, particularly the D5100 which I reviewed yesterday. The D7000 has plenty of other advantages including a more sophisticated and faster autofocus, a 100% coverage viewfinder, ...


9

I can't settle for an alternative that's not vertically 360 degrees (or at least much more than 180 degrees). A camera that shoots in every possible direction is said to have a field of view of 360 (horizontal) x 180 (vertical) degrees. Having more than that means you will be capturing some or all of the scene twice. Consider an imaginary arc that spans ...


9

Even keeping the same sensor size and lens parameters you will always save space by fixing the lens. You remove the need for a lens mount interface, lens barrels can be smaller as they gain stiffness from being fixed, you can put some of the lens mechanisms (zoom and focus motors) into the camera body, use leaf shutters instead of focal plane (Sony RX1). So ...


8

It will really depend on how mature your kid is. Even at 6 some kids could be trusted with a full SLR setup. I was. Thats why I am doing what I do today. If the kid is good with their toys, do not be afraid to get them something with a bit more bang. I bought 2 Canon PowerShot 1300s for my niece and nephew that are not much older. Its a great hobby ...


8

I know the answers are quite complete, but I still have something to add. The main reason I went for the 600D was the flip LCD, because I'm quite small and it makes it easier to take shots of things higher up, I otherwise wouldn't reach (and a wannabe-periscope on urban explorations). It's although useful for taking close ups of things close to the ground ...


8

I think you'll be best served by a large-sensor compact camera, often called a "mirrorless", EVIL, or SLD. A smaller sensor impacts depth of field. A typical high-end P&S like the Canon G12 has what's called a "1/1.7" sensor. This is approximately ¹/₃rd the width of an APS-C sized sensor, which means that the depth of field wide open at f/2.8 is ...


8

My learning process was: buy camera, shoot a lot, work out why I wasn't happy with my photos, go read up on the specific things I thought were wrong, go back and shoot a lot more photos, have more happiness but still some faults, go back and learn a bit more. It got me comfortable with the camera and the process. Then when I was getting a reasonably decent ...


8

Take a look at Are there disadvantages to a prosumer camera for a beginner, aside from cost?. Personally, I think (as you can see in my answer there) that there are enough significant advantages — especially given your expressed interest and background knowledge — that you should consider stretching your initial budget beyond that of an entry-level SLR. I ...


8

Specifically speaking to optical zoom, I would say it is very important and a great benefit to have optical zoom over no optical zoom. Practically speaking to the three cameras you noted though, the difference between 10x and 16x is not very important. At 10x you are going to be zoomed to a 35mm equivalent of 250mm, which is quite a lot of zoom. At that ...



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