Incense

by Bart Arondson

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29

DoF preview is difficult to use well. The idea is simple, but application much less so. Without DoF preview, what you see through the viewfinder is shown with the lens "wide open" -- at its largest possible aperture. This provides no guidance about how much depth of field your picture will have, because (unless you happen to be shooting at maximum aperture) ...


23

The bulb mode is simply a mode where you control the exposure time by holding down the shutter release button. The name comes from the time when the shutter was controlled by a rubber bulb at the end of a hose. You compressed the bulb to open the shutter, and it would stay open as long as you held the bulb compressed. Bulb mode is mostly used when you want ...


21

This is normally referred to as something like "dual control dials", and you're right, it's a very desirable feature. Very few entry-level cameras have this, but it's common on mid-tier "prosumer" DSLRs, and universal on higher-end models. You can find a list of models with this feature on a camera review / database site like Neocamera; try this search: ...


18

The top LCD is very useful in the following circumstances: On a tripod The camera is often at about waist height. You can make/view changes to settings without having to stoop. Unobtrusive photography Lowering the camera from the eye to review settings on the top panel is less obtrusive than holding the camera aways from your body to view the back panel. ...


16

AF-S is AF 'single'- your camera will focus on a fixed object when you press the AF button and will remain focused on that point for as long as you hold the button down. This is best for static subjects. AF-C is AF 'continuous' - the camera will focus on whatever is in the relevant AF points (depending on how you have your AF coverage set up) and will ...


15

And most of all ... , in addition to all these benefits listed above, extremely low battery consumption which will allow you to use your DSLR way longer without attaching bulky battery grips.


15

Applying manual controls allows one more freedom to enhance, manipulate and master applied photographic applications. By understanding the interaction of shutter speed, aperture, and ISO speed, photography — identified as "drawing with light" — can be utilized to its fullest potential. Full creativity with the use of manual control can then be used to ...


15

I don't know what specific model rotary wheel Nikon used in that camera, but moving it fast shouldn't cause any excessive wear. These rotary wheels are usually just rather simple mechanical switches. There are usually two separate switches. Each goes thru one complete cycle each detent, but the two are off from each other by 1/4 cycle. The fancy name for ...


13

You've already gotten some good advice such as going to a store and checkout DP Review. They do enumerate all the menus and all, so it is the closest to knowing how the UI looks without going to actually see the camera. However I will point out that there are more aspects to consider: Great cameras are designed to let you do as much as possible without ...


13

Unless your unit is defective, by default most DSLRs will not release the shutter if: Focus has not been acquired. The flash is charging The buffer is full 1 and 2 can be over-ridden using the custom settings. If you go to MF or AF-C (which defaults to Release-Priority) you should not experience this due to #1. If the flash is down (and no flash is ...


13

Three things: Film is relatively lenient, and exposure variations are handled in the printing. The lens has a relatively small fixed aperture and focus is set at a reasonable distance to get a lot of depth of field. Finally, prints from these things are usually 4×6, and not subjected to a high degree of scrutiny — we basically expect them to be relatively ...


12

I wouldn't own a dslr without one. Not only is it much quicker to check and change camera settings, but when you are shooting at night without one, it really messes with your eyes to have to keep switching from the darkness to the bright LCD. This seems like a small issue until you are trying to do star trails in pure darkness and the LCD keeps blasting ...


12

I use a program mode the majority of the time that I am not in a studio. An example of that would be aperture priority mode - where I get to set the aperture and ISO that stays consistent, and my camera is allowed to determine the shutter speed to keep the exposure proper. Full Auto mode, which many entry level DSLR cameras have, is great if you hand your ...


12

For changing the shutter speed, put the mode dial on Tv (as in the image below: make sure the white line corresponds to the letters Tv ), and turn the wheel high-lighted in red below (excuse my crappy images, I edited all this as something quick and dirty). On your LCD screen, you can see the below screen (let me know if you don't know how to get to this ...


10

1) It is a shutter speed where the photographer taking the picture can control the shutter speed manually. So basically you can have a shutter speed from a couple of fractions of a second to hour. Depends how long you can hold that shutter button. But you could also use a remote release to do this job for you. 2) If i remember right its a very only ...


9

Extremely useful. In face, you only look pictures and navigate thru menus on the main LCD. Everything else you do on the top LCD and these are the crucial tasks: exposition, sensitivity, aperture, etc.


9

It's hard to say really, I find it indispensable, but that's mainly because I'm so used to using it. But it's really the information that I rely on, not the location of the screen. It's a bit of a hangover to the film days when there wasn't a rear LCD. You could say it's easier to pull back and look at the rear LCD screen than to pull back and rotate the ...


9

I'll give you one example of when I've used manual, and see if it makes sense. A while back I was shooting my step-son's "little league" basketball games, which were held indoors. The gym lighting provided reasonably even (if not very bright) illumination, but things like glare on the floor or dark color uniforms kept fooling the camera's light meter into ...


9

Using automatic mode in camera is akin to using a automatic car. It works well if you just have to get to work but not when you are racing or if the track gets interesting :).. Just a few examples when you can't do without manual modes: Control the depth of field: Your camera can't read your mind and know that you want to blur the background. Multiple ...


9

The zoom-in and zoom-out buttons activate the manual-focus assist function. This lets you see pixels closer so that you can see better when focusing. This only applies because you are using Live-View which should be the exception when using a DSLR. In normal operation, through the viewfinder, these buttons will not do anything.


8

I believe these are not user-servicable parts, so I would suggest to locate the nearest Canon service center and have them look at it.


8

You're in the mode of the camera where it shows you the over (or possibly under) exposed parts of your images. Its a useful mode, but if you'd like to exit, click the up or down arrow while you see that image to cycle through the viewing modes.


8

Those controls are made for rapid adjustment. You shouldn't have a problem with using them as quickly as you can accurately make adjustments. I can't guarantee your knob won't eventually fail, but the speed at which you turn it (within practical limits) shouldn't cause any problems for it. Even relatively cheap dials don't have problems with this and ...


7

Based on experience, I am certain you are confusing exposure and exposure-compensation. Exposure is a product of 3 parameters: ISO, shutter-speed, aperture. In Manual mode, you control all of these and doing so sets the exposure. @jrista shows very clearly how to control each of them. For how they relate, see What is the exposure triangle?. ...


7

Manual (M) and semi-automatic modes (Av,Tv) let you control the image you get. You can increase or decrease the depth of field to get clear or blurry background, you can freeze or blur motion (and also control the amount of motion blur), you can decide to use the flash as your primary light source or to just fill in the shadows a bit - and more. The modern ...


7

I'd suggest avoiding a full-auto most of the time, and instead, choose a mode based on what you're shooting -- for creative shooting, aperture priority modes (labelled as Av on some cameras) is great at controlling the depth of field without worrying about exposure too much. For sport, and other fast action, jump to shutter priority ( labelled as Tv on some ...


7

Why don't you set the mode to be manual focus and put a colored tape over the AF/MF button while you are using it and so when you return the lens, the tape will be an in your face reminder to change it back to Auto Focus mode.


7

I believe this is one of the modes you enable by pressing the INFO button. If you repeatedly press INFO to cycle through all the display modes you will eventually arrive back to the default mode which turns the LCD off.


7

Which of the statements is generally more correct? I believe the first one is correct which is Use all available modes the camera has to offer as I learn more about photography. I'll explain how: Most entry DSLR cameras have the following modes: Full Auto Mode: use this mode if you just want to get the shot, perhaps you saw something that will ...


7

I'm not sure it affects the shutter lag, if that's what you mean by reaction time, but it will likely affect the efficiency of the VR system. If you want to use back button focus, you still need to half press the shutter button to activate the VR a couple of seconds or so before fully pressing the shutter button to take the picture. Otherwise the gyros won't ...



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